MU Extension project helps 93-year-old farmer – Houston Herald

Farmers like 93-year-old Harry Keutzer don’t quit just because their body parts slow down.

His hens, cows and pets depend on him. So do customers at the Kansas City-area farmers markets where he sells produce, eggs and hand-loomed rugs.

The Missouri AgrAbility Project, through University of Missouri Extension, Lincoln University Cooperative Extension and the Brain Injury Association of Missouri, provides aging farmers with information, referrals and a variety of resources to keep working.

Lincoln University Extension farm and AgrAbility outreach worker Susan Jaster carried out an assessment of accessibility at Keutzer’s Lafayette County farm and made recommendations on how to make the home safer and more accessible.

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Harry Keutzer

HARRY KEUTZER

MU Extension state health and safety specialist Karen Funkenbusch said AgrAbility helps farmers with disabilities caused by age, injury or illness to keep farming. The program provides research-based information and appropriate referrals to other agencies as needed.

America’s farm population has been aging rapidly over the last 30 years. According to the USDA’s 2012 Census of Agriculture, released in 2014, the average age of U.S. farmers is 58.3 years. There are now more farmers over 75 than between the ages of 35 and 44, Funkenbusch said.

Keutzer and his daughter-in-law, Stacy, grew 3,000 tomato plants in a high tunnel last year. They also planted a three-acre garden and put in a large plot of potatoes on a neighbor’s garden spot. Stacy picks all of the produce and Harry sorts it. Both wash and pack it.

Mobility is a challenge. When it rains, Keutzer has to stay inside and can’t work. But Keutzer’s energy level and stamina during the three-hour farm assessment surprised Jaster.

“He has the energy and deserves to be able to carry on his active life,” she said.

AgrAbility recommended a different type of scooter to reduce fatigue and help him maneuver around the farm over muddy and rough ground. The program also recommended a hydraulic lift to move pallets from the ground to make it easier to load produce onto the enclosed truck the Keutzers take to farmers markets.

Harry’s weathered hands are rarely idle and his mind remains active with farmer ingenuity. He finds it increasingly difficult to plant, so he and his son, Virgil, built a transplanter for their small tractor. It plants and waters the plant plug and lays weed-barrier plastic.

He uses his scooter to check on 100 chickens and takes buckets of water to livestock. He milks a three-teated cow that provides milk for two calves and a gallon a day for milk, butter, homemade ice cream and tapioca for the Keutzers.

He still enjoys cutting wood. He makes wine and helps his daughter-in-law cut fabric strips to make into loomed rugs. In October, he assisted a calving cow with a difficult birth.

Keutzer grew up working with his brothers on his father’s 500-acre farm at Creighton, Mo. He was so small when he started milking cows that his father had a special milking stool made for him.

He went to a country school until eighth grade. He said boys carried .22-caliber single-shot rifles to school, shooting rabbits and squirrels along the way to feed their families. And all boys had a two-bladed pocketknife, he says, to skin wild game and play “mumblepeg” at recess.

After school each day, he listened to 15 minutes of the Tom Mix cowboy show on the radio before starting chores. The radio wasn’t turned on again until 9:30 p.m., when the family listened to “Amos ’n’ Andy” and the news.

He farmed with a team of horses before buying his first tractor, a Farmall F-20. In 1942, Harry bought his second tractor, an Allis-Chalmers WC, at auction for $870.

He and other farmers anxiously awaited electrification through REA. On Jan. 7, 1945, he and his wife, Johnnie, celebrated her birthday in nearby Clinton. They returned home to a house lit with electricity, and their new Montgomery Ward refrigerator was plugged in and running.

He, his wife and a hired hand traveled the area baling hay from spring to fall. His wife drove the tractor as he put the 8 ½-foot wires into the baler. The hired hand tied the bales. It was hard work, but Keutzer and his wife made enough money to buy a new Kaiser automobile with cash.

In 1952, the Keutzers moved to southern Minnesota, where his uncles lived. He rented 320 acres on shares and was one of the first to plant soybean. Corn was selling for $1.25 a bushel under a government price-protection system.

Times were different then, Harry recalls. Farm implement dealers and oil companies helped young farmers get started by extending credit until crops were sold. He bought a four-row cultivator, planter, disk, a new corn picker and two new tractors – a John Deere 720 diesel and an IH Farmall 400 – on credit.

He and Johnnie also opened their home to 50 foster children during their time in Minnesota. The dinner table was often set for more than 20. He taught the children the value of rural life, hard work and being self-sufficient.

In 1959, his father quit farming and he returned to Missouri. Harry rented the farm next to his father’s and had 1,000 acres of South Grand River bottomland.

They farmed the home place until 1972, when Truman Reservoir took much of their land. They sold out and returned to Minnesota to a 45-head dairy farm.

His son met Stacy and married. She wasn’t a farm girl but quickly learned how to care for 45 bucket calves. They farmed there until Harry’s wife died, then moved to Iowa. He worked until he was 81 as a night watchman for Spee-Dee Delivery Services before moving to Napoleon.

Keutzer’s farming practices and lifestyle evolved as times and technology changed. He keeps current with technology by following farm auctions and news online.

Just as he learned to incorporate new farming methods throughout his life, he has learned to adjust as a farming nonagenarian.

AgrAbility gives him the resources to continue doing what he loves to do-provide food to feed America.

National Institute of Food and Agriculture, an agency of USDA, administers the AgrAbility Project.

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Brighten up your home – Waterbury Republican American

Gorgeous Bull Skull by Aureus Arts

CHICAGO TRIBUNENo need to break out the crayons. Beat the winter grays with bright stuff for your home. Here are some products to get you started.

1. Scottish designer Jonathan Saunders’ cheeky designs make clashing colors harmonious. His Herringbone carpet for The Rug Company is a case in point. $129 per square foot at The Rug Company, Chicago.

2. Primary colors and simple organic shapes mark the chairs from the Swedish design trio Claesson Koivisto Rune for Tacchini. The Kelly E Chair is $2,300, at Orange Skin, Chicago.

3. The Lindona Necklace from Songa Designs, an eco-friendly accessories line made by women in Rwanda as a way to establish their economic independence. Each handmade piece is made of repurposed natural materials such as banana leaf fiber, sisal plant, and cow horn. $48 at songadesigns. com.

4. Improve your mood by upholstering Vitra’s Mariposa sofa in a bold hue. Pick from dozens of colors including poppy red, grass green, magenta and lemon, pictured. $7,520 at hivemodern.com.

5. Four shades in different hues give the Tam Tam suspension lamp by Design Fabien Dumas a colorful personality. $1,093 at hivemodern.com.

6. Give time the attention it deserves with a clock that steals the proverbial show. Normann Copenhagen’s Watch Me Wall Clock is $50 at normann-copenhagen.com

7. Studio Job’s paper lamp for Moooi is inspired by classic lamps but draws on a crafty material. $1,703.00 at moooi.com.

8. Warm up any seat in the room with Maharam’s Millerstripe Pillow with fabric designed by famed 20th-century industrial designer Alexander Girard. The 17-inch pillow is 92 percent wool and 8 percent nylon and sports a cotton insert with a duck feather fill. $175 at maharam.com.

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Downtown Jacksonville steakhouse investor's beef with JEA gets mayor's attention – Florida Times-Union

The long quest to turn a century-old, downtown Jacksonville building into an upscale steak restaurant called Cowford Chophouse has gone through Historic Preservation Commission meetings, City Council sessions, courthouse hearings, and construction delays.

The action moved last week to a City Hall conference room, where Mayor Lenny Curry convened a meeting of top officials from his staff, JEA, and the investor behind the multimillion-dollar renovation to work through the latest flare-up.

The gathering came after Jacques Klempf, whose group bought the abandoned building in 2014, fired off emails to Curry that accused JEA of being a “total detriment to downtown re-development” in his dispute with JEA over whether its underground utility equipment poses a risk to the foundation of his building.

The oven-hot rhetoric cooled somewhat in wake of that meeting.

“Everybody is working toward an amicable solution,” said Natalie DeYoung, spokeswoman for Cowford Chophouse.

Taxpayers have a financial stake in the place. The city provided a $500,000 grant and a $250,000 loan in 2014 for the work. Cowford Chophouse LLC is pouring millions of its own money into the renovations.

Curry said when Klempf sent him the angry emails, he decided to get everybody in the same room because the city needs to do what it can to promote private investment, whether it’s in downtown or elsewhere.

“We want government to be an ally, not an obstacle,” he said.

The meeting, whose attendees included JEA Chief Executive Officer Paul McElroy and city Chief Administrative Officer Sam Mousa, didn’t entirely resolve the dispute. But Curry said the meeting put a framework in place for further talks while the renovation stays on track.

The original target date for opening the restaurant was summer 2016, but the renovation is taking far longer. Cowford Chophouse isn’t giving a new target date for the grand opening.

Previously known as the Bostwick Building, the two-story structure came close to being demolished before the city went to court to obtain possession of it. The city then sold it to Klempf, who unveiled plans for a steakhouse at the corner of Bay and Ocean streets in the entertainment district known as The Elbow.

DeYoung said the renovation has fixed the major foundation problems that existed when Klempf bought the building. The foundation is fine now, but Klempf, working with an engineering firm, is concerned that the foundation “could be compromised over time,” DeYoung said.

At issue is an underground structure called a vault that contains transformers that are part of the electrical grid serving downtown. When water gets into the vault, JEA uses a pump to remove it.

Klemp contends that pump also pumps silt from underneath the building into the storm drain, and that as a result, the foundation suffered damage in the past and the same thing will happen again in the future. He wrote to Curry the vault has needed repairs for at least 10 years.

JEA says that’s not the case. Utility spokeswoman Gerri Boyce said the “grit” in the water pumped out of the vault is a result of stormwater run-off picking up particles on the street, not from underneath the building.

“The vault in no way impedes them from opening as planned,” she said.

JEA agreed to hire an outside engineer who will inspect the site and provide findings and recommendations, which could help break the impasse.

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The Iowa State Fair is opening. Time to visit the Butter Cow – NRToday.com

DES MOINES, Iowa — More than 1 million people typically visit the Iowa State Fair each year, and sometimes it seems like every one of them is clustered around the Butter Cow’s climate-controlled glass enclosure.

Here are some details about the creamy sculpture that has been an essential part of the fair since 1911.

WHY A BUTTER COW?

Butter cow sculptures appeared to have started with the Ohio State Fair in 1903, and the first one was displayed at the Iowa State Fair eight years later as a way to promote dairy products in one of the country’s leading agricultural states.

IS IT REALLY MADE OF BUTTER?

It’s not solid butter. The core of the cow is composed of a wood, wire and steel mesh frame, and that structure is then layered with about 600 pounds of Iowa butter. It’s a big sculpture but not as hefty as an actual dairy cow, which typically weighs about 1,000 pounds.

THAT SEEMS LIKE A LOT OF BUTTER TO WASTE

The state fair estimates it’s enough butter for 19,200 slices of toast, but even fairgoers with grumbling stomachs probably wouldn’t want to dig into the sculpture. Most of the butter is reused from year to year, and some of it is up to a decade old.

GIVEN IOWA’S STEAMY AUGUST HEAT, DOES THE COW MELT?

Fairgoers often swelter in the heat and humidity, but the Butter Cow looks out of a glass enclosure kept at a chilly 40 degrees.

WHO DOES THE SCULPTING?

Sarah Pratt, of West Des Moines, has been forming the cow and other buttery creations since 2006, making her only the fifth sculptor in 106 years. This year, she’s also creating of sculpture of Laura Ingalls Wilder in honor of the “Little House on the Prairie” author’s 150th birthday, as well as a replica of the Solheim Cup trophy, awarded to the winners of a golf tournament held this summer in Iowa. Previous sculptures have included Elvis Presley, John Wayne and Leonardo DaVinci’s “The Last Supper.”

DO OTHER STATES HAVE BUTTER SCULPTURES?

Yes. They’re particularly popular in the Midwest, with sculptures in Illinois, Minnesota, Missouri and Wisconsin. They’re also a part of state fairs in other regions, including New York, Texas and Utah. Not all are of cows, though. The Minnesota State Fair’s sculptures are especially beloved, as each year a dairy association’s Princess Kay of the Milky Way and her court have their likenesses carved into 90-pound butter blocks.

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Almost one cow-related attack every week in 2017 thus far – Hindustan Times

In the 33rd week of 2017, India reported its 30th incident of cow-related violence in the country–the most in eight years–in the West Chamaparan district of Bihar where seven Muslims were attacked by cow vigilantes for allegedly eating beef in their homes, the IndiaSpend database of such violence shows. So far we have recorded 75 incidents of bovine-related violence across India since 2010.

On Thursday, August 17, 2017, a mob of over 50 people gathered outside the house of Mohammad Shahabuddin in Dumra village, shouting slogans of ‘Bharat Mata ki jai’, the New Indian Express reported on August 18, 2017. The vigilantes, which included local members of the right-wing Vishwa Hindu Parishad group, reportedly accused Shahabuddin and his neighbours of killing a cow and consuming beef. The mob reportedly locked the Muslims in a room in Shahabuddin’s house and beat them up with wooden sticks. Four people were injured in the attack and hospitalised thereafter, the newspaper report said.

While no charges were filed against the attackers, the local police arrested seven Muslims for “deliberately hurting the religious sentiments of the local majority community”. Explaining why no action had been taken against the attackers, the police said: “There has been no such complaint about the attack so far,” the New Indian Express reported.

This is the second attack to take place in Bihar within a fortnight, and the third attack reported in the state this year. Prior to 2017, Bihar did not report a single attack for at least seven years since 2010–the start point for the IndiaSpenddatabase of such violence.

Created through a collection and content analysis of reports in the English media, the shows that 97% (73 of 75) of such incidents were reported after Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government came to power in May 2014. The data show that Muslims were the target of 56% (42 of 75) cases of violence centred on bovine issues over nearly eight years (2010 to 2017) and comprised 86% (24 of 28) killed in 75 incidents.

More than half or 53% of the cow-related violence–40 of 75 cases–were from states governed by the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), when the attacks were reported, revealed our analysis of violence recorded until August 18, 2017.

The recent two cases of cow-related violence in Bihar are recorded under the Janata Dal (United) government. On July 27, 2017, the JD(U) entered into an alliance with the BJP.

Incidence of cow-related violence in India (2010-2017)

Spread Of Cow-Related Violence In India (2010-2017)

(Saldanha is an assistant editor with IndiaSpend.)

(Indiaspend.org is a data-driven, public-interest journalism non-profit/FactChecker.in is fact-checking initiative, scrutinising for veracity and context statements made by individuals and organisations in public life.)

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200 cows die of starvation at a shelter run by BJP leader in Chhattisgarh – Hindustan Times

A Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) leader was arrested on Friday after at least 200 cows died allegedly of starvation and lack of medicines at his cow shelter in Rajpur village of Chhattisgarh’s Durg district.

The officials have, so far, confirmed 30 starvation-related deaths.

Villagers, however, alleged that the number of deaths would be 200 and most of them have been buried near the shelter. Several carcasses, other than those buried, were found in the vicinity, they alleged.

The BJP leader, Harish Verma, who is also the vice president of Jamul Nagar Nigam, has been running the shelter for last seven years.

“He was arrested on Friday evening after being charged under sections 4 and 6 of Chhattisgarh Agricultural Cattle Preservation act -2004, Section 11 of Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act 1960 and Section 409 of Indian Penal Code (IPC),” police said.

“We noticed JCB machines operating near the cow shelter two days ago and we informed some media persons. When we reached here, we found that many trenches were being dug to bury the dead cows lying on the ground. They were at least 200 in number,” said Seva Ram Sahu, the Rajpur Sarpanch’s husband.

According to the doctors present at the spot, cows died due to “starvation and lack of medicines”.

However, the BJP leader, Harish Verma attributed the deaths to collapsing of a wall two days ago.

“At this stage, the reason behind the cow deaths seems to be lack of fodder. The post mortem of 27 cows have been done in last two days, “ said MK Chawala , deputy director , veterinary department of Durg district.

“The cows buried near the shelter are yet to be exhumed,” he said.

Another 50 cows, said to be critical, are being treated. “The number of deaths may rise ,” the doctor added.

A local sub-divisional magistrate (SDM) , Rajesh Ratre, claimed the exact death figures are yet to ascertained and investigation were on.

“Villagers claimed that more than 200 cows died in last few days because of lack of fodder, which seems to be true . We will submit a detailed report to the district magistrate and action would be taken accordingly,” Patre said.

Verma alleged that the state government did not provide the money for the shelter which he has been demanding for 2 years.

“My gaushala (cow shelter) is overcrowded . There are more than 650 cows against the capacity of 220. I have intimated the government many times that I am not able feed them, but in vain. More than Rs 10 lakh meant for the gaushala is pending with the government but they have not granted till now. I am not guilty for the deaths,” added Harish Verma.

Police are waiting for a formal complaint to initiate action against the BJP leader.

“The Gau Seva Ayog intends to register a case of breach of trust and negligence. We will register an FIR against the leader once the complaint is registered,” said Deepanshu Kabra, IG Durg.

AK Panigrahi, secretary, Gau Seva Ayog, Chhattisgarh said, “We have found irregularities in the functioning of the Gauhala and thus the grants were suspended. But government grant is not the only source of income for running a shelter.”

There are 115 gaushalas in Chhattisgarh having 26,000 bovines.

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Curious about Iowa State Fair's famous Butter Cow? Here's everything you ever wanted to know – Fox News

More than 1 million people typically visit the Iowa State Fair each year, and sometimes it seems like every one of them is clustered around the Butter Cow’s climate-controlled glass enclosure.

Here are some details about the creamy sculpture that has been an essential part of the fair since 1911.

Why a butter cow?

Butter cow sculptures appeared to have started with the Ohio State Fair in 1903, and the first one was displayed at the Iowa State Fair eight years later as a way to promote dairy products in one of the country’s leading agricultural states.

THE MOST DELICIOUS DEEP-FRIED TREATS FROM THIS YEAR’S STATE FAIRS

Is it really made of butter?

It’s not solid butter. The core of the cow is composed of a wood, wire and steel mesh frame, and that structure is then layered with about 600 pounds (270 kilograms) of Iowa butter. It’s a big sculpture but not as hefty as an actual dairy cow, which typically weighs about 1,000 pounds (450 kilograms).

That seems like a lot of butter to waste.

The state fair estimates it’s enough butter for 19,200 slices of toast, but even fairgoers with grumbling stomachs probably wouldn’t want to dig into the sculpture. Most of the butter is reused from year to year, and some of it is up to a decade old.

MARGARINE SALES SLIPPING AS CUSTOMERS CHURN BACK TO BUTTER

Given Iowa’s steamy August heat, does the cow melt?

Fairgoers often swelter in the heat and humidity, but the Butter Cow looks out of a glass enclosure kept at a chilly 40 degrees (4.4 Celsius).

Who does the sculpting, and does the cow have company?

Sarah Pratt, of West Des Moines, has been forming the cow and other buttery creations since 2006, making her only the fifth sculptor in 106 years. This year, she’s also creating of sculpture of Laura Ingalls Wilder in honor of the “Little House on the Prairie” author’s 150th birthday, as well as a replica of the Solheim Cup trophy, awarded to the winners of a golf tournament held this summer in Iowa. Previous sculptures have included Elvis Presley, John Wayne and Leonardo DaVinci’s “The Last Supper.”

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS

Do other states have butter sculptures?

Yes. They’re particularly popular in the Midwest, with sculptures in Illinois, Minnesota, Missouri and Wisconsin. They’re also a part of state fairs in other regions, including New York, Texas and Utah. Not all are of cows, though. The Minnesota State Fair’s sculptures are especially beloved, as each year a dairy association’s Princess Kay of the Milky Way and her court have their likenesses carved into 90-pound (40 kilogram) butter blocks.

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Iowa State Fair cow and boy taking nap become internet sensation – AOL

Despite hours of hard work and dedication, a boy and his cow finished fifth place out of seven other contestants at the Iowa State Fair’s youth dairy cattle show on Sunday.

Mitchell Miner, 15, and his cow, Audri, were exhausted after the show and took a nap together inside a barn, where his father, Jeremy Miner, took photos of the duo snuggling up while they slept. His father would later post a photo of the two napping together on Facebook Sunday night, with the caption: “Our son Mitchell and his heifer after showing yesterday.”

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Little did his father know, however, the post, which has since been made inaccessible to the public on Facebook, would immediately go viral and tally more than 15,000 likes by the next afternoon, Fox News reported.

Laura Miner, Mitchell’s mother, told the Des Moines Register she thinks the photo won over thousands because people usually enjoy seeing a close bond between a kid and their animal.

“I think it’s just when you spend that much time with them, they get really comfortable,” she told the outlet.

SEE ALSO: This tiny cow might be the smallest in the entire world

Laura Miner said her family borrows animals for the summer. Both she and her husband grew up on a farm but are the first generations of each of their families to live outside of one. However, she said they want to continue to instill the same values they learned living on farmland to their children.

“We learned a lot from the farm,” Jeremy Miner said. “We have those values instilled in us and we are trying to do what we can to preserve that.”

Audri will be heading back to a dairy farm after the family’s final showing in September.

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MPI: Castlerock Dairies cow neglect case bad for 'Team New Zealand' – The Southland Times

One of the animals neglected in the Castlerock Dairies in Southland.

One of the animals neglected in the Castlerock Dairies in Southland.

The Ministry for Primary Industries has said animal welfare cases like the recent Castlerock Dairies cow neglect court case are bad for “Team New Zealand”.

The extreme neglect suffered during early 2015 by more than 950 cows on two Lumsden farms owned by Castlerock hit the news on Tuesday, as sentencing was passed on the McCullough family owners, and managers Jared Matthews and Dean McMillan.

The neglect resulted in 193 cows being euthanised, and 761 requiring treatment for their injuries – largely consisting of lameness and ingrown horns – from a total herd of about 4000.

Castlerock was fined $37,500 and ordered to pay $11,574 prosecution costs.

Matthews and McMillan were each fined $10,000 and ordered to do 275 hours community service.

Neither Castlerock Dairies director Graham McCullough, nor its former managers, could be contacted for comment on Wednesday.

Ministry for Primary Industries manager of compliance investigations Gary Orr said cases of this type reflected badly on New Zealand’s agricultural export industry as a whole.

“Every time there’s a significant animal welfare case in any of our agricultural sectors, media reporting is, unfortunately, global nowadays, insofar as it goes online and has international reach.

“A lack of confidence in New Zealand’s animal welfare systems within foreign markets leads directly to a lack of confidence in our products, which is why it’s so important to have strong compliance throughout the sector.”

Animal welfare was a key issue for all consumers nowadays, Orr said.


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“This is something well understood not only by farmers, but at all levels of the industry, and plays a key part in promoting and marketing our products abroad. Situations like [Castlerock] let ‘Team New Zealand’ down, if you like.”

Other industry bodies were equally condemnatory.

Federated Farmers said it too was concerned about the impact of such cases on consumer perception.

“The level of cruelty is unprecedented and not acceptable to the dairy sector. This case of mistreatment slurs the good reputation of the majority of dairy farmers who are committed to providing their animals with a healthy and safe environment, and farming to high standards,” a spokesperson said.

Although the size of the operation may have been an aggravating factor at Castlerock, it was still an isolated case, they believed.

“Farms this size are in the minority. Perhaps the expectation on those running the scale of this particular operation was simply too great.

“We aren’t aware of any increase in relation to the scale of dairy farming in NZ. This is not typical practice on dairy farms and, in our view, is an isolated incident.”

Federated Farmers Southland provincial president Allan Baird said he was confident any animal welfare issues at Castlerock had since been addressed.

“I know they’ve had close monitoring from the MPI veterinary team since the incident in 2015, so I’m sure matters have improved,” he said.

Dairy NZ spokesperson Jenny Jago said despite the rapid expansion of the dairy industry during recent years, such neglect was still rare.

“We haven’t noticed any particular increase in cases of this type. We operate an early response service that allows anybody concerned about their or another farm’s ability to operate within expected standards to get in touch and receive assistance, and if anything there’s been a slight decrease in cases coming through that channel recently.”

Often larger dairy operations were better able to address any issues arising, Jago said.

“Larger outfits are able to segment the roles required to properly look after a large herd, and hire specialists for each role, meaning standards are often at a very high level.”

Five other instances of animal cruelty in New Zealand

1. In 2015 a dairy worker was handed what is believed to be New Zealand’s longest-ever prison sentence for animal cruelty, after cows were beaten, had their tails broken and were shot in the kneecaps on a farm he managed. Michael James Whitelock was sentenced in the Greymouth District Court on Wednesday to four and a half years’ jail and banned from owning animals for 10 years.
One cow due to be euthanised was walked to the offal pit where Whitelock gave a single-barrel shotgun to an employee and instructed him to shoot the cow in the legs. Whitelock and three employees each fired one shot at the cow’s legs before it was euthanised. MPI said Whitelock beat another cow with a fencing baton, which resulted in a traumatic eye injury. Whitelock then tried to euthanise the animal but failed and ended up putting it in the offal pit while it was still alive.

2. In 2013 Waikato farmer, Lourens Barend Erasmus, was sentenced to 2 years’ jail at the Waihi District Court for wilfully ill treating more than 100 cows in his dairy heard. He admitted breaking the tails of 115 and the bones of others by hitting them with milking cups and steel pipes.

3. A farmer who neglected his pigs and cows so badly some had to be euthanised pleaded guilty to mistreating animals last year. Robert Ross Dawson, 64, owned was a property in Hurford, just outside New Plymouth, and in 2014 MPI investigators found a critically unwell Hereford calf that died within 24 hours of the inspection. A bath being used as a trough for pigs was thick with green algae and contaminated with urine and faeces. Six pigs were found in two small pens. He admitted two charges of failing to ensure the needs of an animal were met, which carry a maximum penalty of one year imprisonment and a $50,000 fine or both, and one of failing to comply with a requirement of an MPI inspector which has a maximum penalty of $5000.


 – Stuff

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Kelly Country: Cow price gap widens between Victoria and Queensland – The Weekly Times

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Kelly Country: Cow price gap widens between Victoria and Queensland
The Weekly Times
In the past three months price trends for cows sold in Queensland and Victoria have split, with the gap now one of the widest in the past three years. As of the first week of August the average price for a medium cow in Queensland was at 188.6c/kg

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US Milk Producers Chief Criticizes Canadian NAFTA Stance on Dairy – DTN The Progressive Farmer (registration) (blog)

 

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From time to time, Schneider Electric will perform statistical analysis using data provided by you for the purposes of: determining interest in various services provided by Schneider Electric, inform advertisers of the effectiveness of their marketing campaigns, and to better serve your information needs. Also, Schneider Electric may allow select third parties to offer subscription services or fee-based products through the Site. Schneider Electric makes no guarantees in regard to the policies of these parties, so you should investigate each site’s privacy policy before providing personally identifiable information to third parties. Notwithstanding the foregoing, Schneider Electric does not sell or rent your personal information to third parties.

Schneider Electric may disclose your personal information if required to do so by law or in the good-faith belief that such action is necessary to: (a) conform with the edicts of law or comply with legal process served on Schneider Electric or the Site; (b) protect or defend the rights of property of Schneider Electric and its web sites; or (c) act in urgent circumstances to protect the personal safety of Schneider Electric employees, users of Schneider Electric products or services, or members of the general public.

At times Schneider Electric may allow customer to subscribe and/or pay for services through the Site. In such event, Schneider Electric may use a third-party shipping company to fulfill customer orders through the Site, and may also use a credit card processing company to bill you for goods or services that you request. The current credit card processing company that Schneider Electric uses to store and process credit card transactions is called CyberSource®, and more information about this company can be found at http://www.cybersource.com/. Schneider Electric takes all reasonable measures to select third-party agents for fulfillment and financial processing that agree to not retain, share, store, or use your personal or financial information for any other purposes than fulfilling orders or enforcing customer agreements.

You should note that when you visit this Site, the pages you visit may be tracked. When you give us personal information, Schneider Electric will not share that information with third parties without your permission, other than for the limited exceptions already listed. Such information will only be used for the purposes stated above.

Schneider Electric will retain your information for as long as your account is active or as needed to provide you services. Schneider Electric will retain and use your personal information as necessary to comply with its legal obligations, resolve disputes, and enforce its agreements. Upon request, Schneider Electric may reasonably grant you access to the personal information that it holds, and will make a reasonable effort to correct, update, or delete information that is demonstrated to be inaccurate or incomplete.

Use of Cookies

Schneider Electric utilizes ‘cookies’ to provide custom content and measure visitation patterns and user preferences. Cookies are small text files sent from Schneider Electric to your hard drive. These files do not allow anyone else to obtain your personal information, nor do they cause any harm to your computer. Schneider Electric may provide user data obtained using cookies to third parties, but this information will not include your personally identifiable information.

Third parties may use cookies, web beacons, and similar technologies to collect or receive user data from the Site and elsewhere on the internet and use that information to provide measurement services and target ads. If you would like more information about internet-based advertising, go to www.aboutads.info. If you would like to opt out of cookie-based collection and use of information for ad targeting, go to http://www.aboutads.info/choices.

Security Measures

Schneider Electric uses a variety of security measures to protect your personally identifiable information from unauthorized use, which may include but is not limited to, the use of SSL encryption. Schneider Electric services may, however, contain links to other web sites that are not controlled by Schneider Electric. Please take all necessary precautions to protect your information when you visit one of these sites.

Schneider Electric does not guarantee and makes no representations or warranties that this Site and access thereto are secure, or that this Site is free of viruses or bugs that could result in damage to or the loss of data. You are responsible from protecting your data from viruses.

Schneider Electric is not interested in minors

Schneider Electric has no desire to collect information from those under the age of 18. In an instance where such information was collected it would be purely accidental and unintentional. Schneider Electric encourages parents to discuss the Internet with their children and monitor personal information that a child may provide via the Internet.

Safe Harbor and Dispute Resolution

Telvent DTN, LLC (Schneider Electric) complies with the U.S.-EU Safe Harbor Framework and the U.S.-Swiss Safe Harbor Framework as set forth by the U.S. Department of Commerce regarding the collection, use, and retention of personal information from European Union member countries and Switzerland. Telvent DTN, LLC (Schneider Electric) has certified that it adheres to the Safe Harbor Privacy Principles of notice, choice, onward transfer, security, data integrity, access, and enforcement. To learn more about the Safe Harbor program, and to view the certification of Telvent DTN, LLC (Schneider Electric), please visit http://www.export.gov/safeharbor/.

Any questions or concerns regarding the use or disclosure of personal information should be directed to Schneider Electric at the address given above. Schneider Electric will investigate and attempt to resolve complaints and disputes regarding use and disclosure of personal information by reference to the principles contained in this policy. For complaints that cannot be resolved between Schneider Electric and the complainant, Schneider Electric has agreed to participate in and utilize PrivacyTrust online dispute resolution and make a reasonable effort to resolve any complaints pursuant to Safe Harbor principles. For more information about PrivacyTrust or the operation of PrivacyTrust’s dispute resolution process, please visit http://www.etrust.org/cert/678545.html. The PrivacyTrust online dispute resolution process shall be conducted in English.

Adherence by Schneider Electric to these Safe Harbor principles may be limited (a) to the extent required to respond to a legal or ethical obligation; (b) to the extent necessary to meet national security, public interest or law enforcement obligations; and (c) to the extent expressly permitted by an applicable law, rule, or regulation.

Change in Ownership

In the event of a change in ownership of Schneider Electric as a result of a sale, merger, acquisition or bankruptcy, then Schneider Electric reserves the right to transfer all of your personal information to a separate entity. Schneider Electric will use commercially reasonable efforts to notify you (e.g. by posting on its Site, issuing a press release, or notification by e-mail) of any change in ownership.

Terms of Use

Access to Password Protected / Secure Areas

Access to and use of password protected or secure areas of this Site is restricted to authorized users only. Individuals misusing passwords and unauthorized individuals attempting to access restricted areas of this Site may be subject to civil liability and criminal prosecution. You must immediately notify Schneider Electric of any unauthorized uses of password protected or secure areas or any other breaches of security.

Comments and Content Control

If you post comments, materials, or links (collectively “content”), you will have full editorial control of your content, subject to F.C.C. and other legal restrictions on the public broadcast of information, and you assume full responsibility for your content and any harm resulting from your content or conduct on this Site. However, Schneider Electric retains absolute discretion to refuse, edit, or remove any content. Furthermore, Schneider Electric may, in its sole discretion, suspend your access to this Site, any Products, and Schneider Electric’s systems if it determines that the your actions or your content are or may be or become illegal, objectionable, or compromise the integrity and/or security of the Schneider Electric’s systems or business. You will not post or make available any content or elements thereof that (a) infringes on the intellectual property rights of any third party; (b) violates any law or regulation; (c) is defamatory or trade libelous; (d) is pornographic or obscene; (e) violates any right of privacy; or (f) contains any viruses, Trojan horses, worms, time bombs, cancelbots or other computer programming defects intended to damage any system or data. Schneider Electric has no obligation to you and undertakes no responsibility to review your content to determine whether any of it may incur liability to third parties. Schneider Electric has no obligation to attribute your content to that of you, or to deliver your content to a Schneider Electric subscriber who does not want to receive such content.

Schneider Electric has not reviewed, and cannot review, all of the comments, material, or links (collectively “content”) posted to this Site, and Schneider Electric cannot be responsible for that content or any effect thereof. Schneider Electric does not represent or imply that it endorses any content posted on this Site, nor does Schneider Electric represent or imply that it believes any such content to be accurate or harmless. This Site may contain content that is offensive, indecent, objectionable, or inaccurate; violates privacy or publicity rights; or infringes intellectual property rights. Schneider Electric shall not be responsible for any harm resulting from visitors’ use of this Site or visitors’ use of any content posted on this Site.

Trademark and Copyright Information

The Schneider Electric brands and any registered trademarks of Schneider Electric referred to on this Site are the sole property of Schneider Electric and/or its parent companies or affiliates. They may not be used for any purpose without the express written consent of Schneider Electric. You agree not to reproduce, other than for your own personal, non-commercial use, all or part of this Site or its content on any medium whatsoever without the express written consent of Schneider Electric. Schneider Electric does not grant any right or license for the personal and non-commercial use of the Site or its content, except for a “non-exclusive” license to consult it on an “as is” basis, at your own risk. All other rights are reserved.

Policy Changes & Updating Information

Schneider Electric makes all reasonable efforts to ensure that this Site is accessible at all times. You may however be prevented from accessing the Site or experience access problems due to technical difficulties or during maintenance or work upgrades. In addition, while Schneider Electric takes reasonable care to ensure that the information on this Site is kept up to date, it makes no representation or warranty, express or implied, of its accuracy or completeness. Schneider Electric accepts no liability for any direct, special, or consequential damages of whatsoever kind and howsoever caused, arising out of your use of or inability to access the Site.

The content of this Site and the websites accessible via hypertext at this Site may be corrected, amended or updated at any time and without notice.

Schneider Electric reserves the right to modify this Privacy Policy and Terms of Use whenever the need arises. Updates to this policy will be posted to this Site in a timely manner. When such updates are made, the “last updated” date at the top of this privacy policy will be modified. This policy is not a contractual agreement and does not provide you with any legal right. Unless otherwise specified, this Site, its content, and its domain name and URLs are the sole property of Telvent DTN, LLC. If you feel that this Site is not following its stated privacy policy, then you may contact us at:

Telvent DTN, LLC

ATTN: GENERAL COUNSEL

9110 West Dodge Road

Omaha, NE 68114

Phone: 1-800-485-4000

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Sneak peek: Red Cow's newest burger restaurant replaces Green Mill in Uptown – Minneapolis Star Tribune

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Minneapolis Star Tribune

Sneak peek: Red Cow's newest burger restaurant replaces Green Mill in Uptown
Minneapolis Star Tribune
The newest Red Cow is debuting next week in a building previously occupied by a Green Mill for nearly four decades. The popular local burger chain, which has four other locations in the Twin Cities, will unveil its remake of the long-tenured space on Aug.

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