MU Extension project helps 93-year-old farmer – Houston Herald

Farmers like 93-year-old Harry Keutzer don’t quit just because their body parts slow down.

His hens, cows and pets depend on him. So do customers at the Kansas City-area farmers markets where he sells produce, eggs and hand-loomed rugs.

The Missouri AgrAbility Project, through University of Missouri Extension, Lincoln University Cooperative Extension and the Brain Injury Association of Missouri, provides aging farmers with information, referrals and a variety of resources to keep working.

Lincoln University Extension farm and AgrAbility outreach worker Susan Jaster carried out an assessment of accessibility at Keutzer’s Lafayette County farm and made recommendations on how to make the home safer and more accessible.

+1 

Harry Keutzer

HARRY KEUTZER

MU Extension state health and safety specialist Karen Funkenbusch said AgrAbility helps farmers with disabilities caused by age, injury or illness to keep farming. The program provides research-based information and appropriate referrals to other agencies as needed.

America’s farm population has been aging rapidly over the last 30 years. According to the USDA’s 2012 Census of Agriculture, released in 2014, the average age of U.S. farmers is 58.3 years. There are now more farmers over 75 than between the ages of 35 and 44, Funkenbusch said.

Keutzer and his daughter-in-law, Stacy, grew 3,000 tomato plants in a high tunnel last year. They also planted a three-acre garden and put in a large plot of potatoes on a neighbor’s garden spot. Stacy picks all of the produce and Harry sorts it. Both wash and pack it.

Mobility is a challenge. When it rains, Keutzer has to stay inside and can’t work. But Keutzer’s energy level and stamina during the three-hour farm assessment surprised Jaster.

“He has the energy and deserves to be able to carry on his active life,” she said.

AgrAbility recommended a different type of scooter to reduce fatigue and help him maneuver around the farm over muddy and rough ground. The program also recommended a hydraulic lift to move pallets from the ground to make it easier to load produce onto the enclosed truck the Keutzers take to farmers markets.

Harry’s weathered hands are rarely idle and his mind remains active with farmer ingenuity. He finds it increasingly difficult to plant, so he and his son, Virgil, built a transplanter for their small tractor. It plants and waters the plant plug and lays weed-barrier plastic.

He uses his scooter to check on 100 chickens and takes buckets of water to livestock. He milks a three-teated cow that provides milk for two calves and a gallon a day for milk, butter, homemade ice cream and tapioca for the Keutzers.

He still enjoys cutting wood. He makes wine and helps his daughter-in-law cut fabric strips to make into loomed rugs. In October, he assisted a calving cow with a difficult birth.

Keutzer grew up working with his brothers on his father’s 500-acre farm at Creighton, Mo. He was so small when he started milking cows that his father had a special milking stool made for him.

He went to a country school until eighth grade. He said boys carried .22-caliber single-shot rifles to school, shooting rabbits and squirrels along the way to feed their families. And all boys had a two-bladed pocketknife, he says, to skin wild game and play “mumblepeg” at recess.

After school each day, he listened to 15 minutes of the Tom Mix cowboy show on the radio before starting chores. The radio wasn’t turned on again until 9:30 p.m., when the family listened to “Amos ’n’ Andy” and the news.

He farmed with a team of horses before buying his first tractor, a Farmall F-20. In 1942, Harry bought his second tractor, an Allis-Chalmers WC, at auction for $870.

He and other farmers anxiously awaited electrification through REA. On Jan. 7, 1945, he and his wife, Johnnie, celebrated her birthday in nearby Clinton. They returned home to a house lit with electricity, and their new Montgomery Ward refrigerator was plugged in and running.

He, his wife and a hired hand traveled the area baling hay from spring to fall. His wife drove the tractor as he put the 8 ½-foot wires into the baler. The hired hand tied the bales. It was hard work, but Keutzer and his wife made enough money to buy a new Kaiser automobile with cash.

In 1952, the Keutzers moved to southern Minnesota, where his uncles lived. He rented 320 acres on shares and was one of the first to plant soybean. Corn was selling for $1.25 a bushel under a government price-protection system.

Times were different then, Harry recalls. Farm implement dealers and oil companies helped young farmers get started by extending credit until crops were sold. He bought a four-row cultivator, planter, disk, a new corn picker and two new tractors – a John Deere 720 diesel and an IH Farmall 400 – on credit.

He and Johnnie also opened their home to 50 foster children during their time in Minnesota. The dinner table was often set for more than 20. He taught the children the value of rural life, hard work and being self-sufficient.

In 1959, his father quit farming and he returned to Missouri. Harry rented the farm next to his father’s and had 1,000 acres of South Grand River bottomland.

They farmed the home place until 1972, when Truman Reservoir took much of their land. They sold out and returned to Minnesota to a 45-head dairy farm.

His son met Stacy and married. She wasn’t a farm girl but quickly learned how to care for 45 bucket calves. They farmed there until Harry’s wife died, then moved to Iowa. He worked until he was 81 as a night watchman for Spee-Dee Delivery Services before moving to Napoleon.

Keutzer’s farming practices and lifestyle evolved as times and technology changed. He keeps current with technology by following farm auctions and news online.

Just as he learned to incorporate new farming methods throughout his life, he has learned to adjust as a farming nonagenarian.

AgrAbility gives him the resources to continue doing what he loves to do-provide food to feed America.

National Institute of Food and Agriculture, an agency of USDA, administers the AgrAbility Project.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

Source link

Brighten up your home – Waterbury Republican American

Gorgeous Bull Skull by Aureus Arts

CHICAGO TRIBUNENo need to break out the crayons. Beat the winter grays with bright stuff for your home. Here are some products to get you started.

1. Scottish designer Jonathan Saunders’ cheeky designs make clashing colors harmonious. His Herringbone carpet for The Rug Company is a case in point. $129 per square foot at The Rug Company, Chicago.

2. Primary colors and simple organic shapes mark the chairs from the Swedish design trio Claesson Koivisto Rune for Tacchini. The Kelly E Chair is $2,300, at Orange Skin, Chicago.

3. The Lindona Necklace from Songa Designs, an eco-friendly accessories line made by women in Rwanda as a way to establish their economic independence. Each handmade piece is made of repurposed natural materials such as banana leaf fiber, sisal plant, and cow horn. $48 at songadesigns. com.

4. Improve your mood by upholstering Vitra’s Mariposa sofa in a bold hue. Pick from dozens of colors including poppy red, grass green, magenta and lemon, pictured. $7,520 at hivemodern.com.

5. Four shades in different hues give the Tam Tam suspension lamp by Design Fabien Dumas a colorful personality. $1,093 at hivemodern.com.

6. Give time the attention it deserves with a clock that steals the proverbial show. Normann Copenhagen’s Watch Me Wall Clock is $50 at normann-copenhagen.com

7. Studio Job’s paper lamp for Moooi is inspired by classic lamps but draws on a crafty material. $1,703.00 at moooi.com.

8. Warm up any seat in the room with Maharam’s Millerstripe Pillow with fabric designed by famed 20th-century industrial designer Alexander Girard. The 17-inch pillow is 92 percent wool and 8 percent nylon and sports a cotton insert with a duck feather fill. $175 at maharam.com.

Follow Us on Google News



WATCH: Ikea marks 30 years of flat-pack pain – Independent Online

The IKEA House Party is an immersive week-long series of daytime experiences and evening house parties. Picture: YouTube.com

London — To mark 30 years in Britain, Ikea has transformed a London house to recreate living rooms through the decades. Sarah Rainey takes a look at the good, the bad – and the downright bizarre.

The 1980s

From the Jane Fonda workout video and David Bowie vinyls on the bookcase to My Weekly magazine on the table, this room is unmistakably Eighties: bold prints, clashing colours and statement furniture everywhere.

Consumerism was on the rise in this era and house-proud Britons wanted to put what they owned on display.

Red was the most popular colour for the iconic Klippan sofa; walls were often painted blue and many items, from rugs to tables, were look-at-me round rather than rectangular. Note the zig-zag shelves; completely impractical, but certainly a talking point.

“People were very proud of their homes in the Eighties,” explains Clotilde Passalacqua, Ikea UK’s interior design leader. “Previously, interior design had been expensive and out of reach. Suddenly, it was affordable. They could buy the things they saw in glossy magazines – striped curtains, bright cushions and trendy table lamps.

“This was a decade of rebelliousness, of expressing your personality and not caring what other people thought. The same looks you saw in fashion, you saw in people’s homes.” Bestsellers included glass tables, laminated cabinets, vinyl record racks and leather recliner chairs in bright colours.

In this era, she explains, Ikea was mostly targeted at families who wanted pieces to be durable, rather than just cheap – so price tags were higher than today.

[embedded content]

The 1990s

By the Nineties, Ikea started to understand the British way of living. Laurent Tiersen, Ikea’s UK brand manager, explains they do more than 200 house visits a year to understand how people use the rooms in their homes.

Entertaining was a big trend in this era; sideboards, soft-lighting lamps and stackable tables (handy for canapés or drinks) were bestsellers – as was glassware including champagne flutes. One of the iconic pieces of the decade was the PS 1995 clock, which came with an in-built liquor cabinet – another must for sociable homeowners.

Colours were neutral: magnolia walls, beige soft furnishings and wood floors. Matching furniture was important, with coordinating cushions, curtains and accessories such as these beanbags.”Living rooms were clean and stripped back,” says Clotilde. “People had busy lives – there were more women than ever in the workplace – and home was a peaceful haven.”

Ikea also launched its children’s range, called Mammut, in 1994. The Lack coffee table continued to be popular as a family staple.This decade also marked the growth of technology in the home: TVs had their own stands and sturdy desks were needed for computers. Vinyl shelves were replaced by CD holder.

“This was the early era of furniture doubling up as technology solutions,” says Clotilde. “People wanted the latest mod-cons, but they didn’t want them cluttering up their homes.”

The 2000s

From the high-gloss surfaces to the cow hide rug and a faux fireplace, the turn of the century was all about experimenting.This kind of gaudy feature wall – as seen on TV home makeover shows such as Changing Rooms and DIY SOS – appeared across the country as families rejected the bland serenity of Nineties interiors.

“DIY was on the rise and people wanted to express their personalities in their living rooms,” Clotilde says. “They liked trying out bold wallpaper and dark, daring colours such as black and purple. Everything was minimalist and contemporary: sleek surfaces, monochrome furnishings, industrial textures like plastic and chrome.”

The future

With its clinical lighting, bleached furniture and hushed atmosphere, it may look a little like a dentist’s surgery – but the home of the future has plenty of surprises in store.On one wall are Floalt light panels, motion-activated by sensors in the ceiling, which have modes including soft sunset, white and dark. 

At present the panels are operated by a dimmer switch, but it is hoped in future we will control them with our phones.”The home of the future is all about control: homeowners want to be in charge with technology at their beck and call,” says Clotilde. 

They’re also conscious of the environment, saving energy and sustainability.’There will be wireless charging furniture – tables and chairs that charge our devices – and ‘smart’ mirrors, which can also tell you the time, weather and what’s on your to-do list. 

The room features 3D-printed chairs, made by a hi-tech printer. There is a screen called a ‘shadow tracker’, which uses movement and temperature to create constantly-changing digital ‘art’.

The most eye-catching feature is the greenery-covered walls. These are hydroponics, specially-cultivated plants that can be grown indoors if you don’t have a garden. Clotilde says: “Outdoor space will be even harder to come by in the future. Not only do indoor plants clean the air but they have a very soothing effect.”

Homes are set to get smaller, so designers are focusing on storage, including using previously-empty space above eye level, as well as space-saving models such as fold-up beds, collapsible chairs and multi-purpose stackable stools. Some innovations, it must be admitted, are more exciting than others.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

New National Milk Production Record Set by Wisconsin Cow – Dairy Herd Management

One Wisconsin cow has beat out another Wisconsin cow for the most milk produced in a single, 365-day lactation, reports Holstein Association USA.

Selz-Pralle Aftershock 3918 produced 78,170 lb of milk, 3,094 pounds of butterfat and 2,393 lb of protein in her last lactation. She is owned by Pam Selz-Pralle and Scott Pralle, Humbird, Wis. Aftershock 3918 produced an average of 15 lb of combined fat and protein each day of her most recent lactation, and had produced 44,000 lb. of milk as a three-year-old and nearly 59,000 lb of milk as four-year-old.

“3918 descends from a cow we bought when we expanded 20 years ago,” says Pralle.  “She is a solid, hardworking, ‘blue collar’ Holstein cow who lives in a freestall barn and likes to be left alone. She is the perfect cow since she causes no problems; you don’t even know she’s there.”

The Selz-Pralles milk 360 registered Holsteins, which have a rolling herd average of 30,917 lb. of milk.

Aftershock 3918 beats out Ever-Green-View My Gold-ET, who was the previous record holder with 77,480 lb of milk in a single lactation. My Gold is owned by the Kestell family of Waldo, Wis.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

I-20 West at "Dead Man's Curve" back open following cattle truck wreck – WVTM13

UPDATE, 1:00 a.m., Thursday

Interstate 20 west at I-59 South is back open Thursday morning following a crash Wednesday afternoon involving an overturned cattle truck.

Advertisement

UPDATE, 9:45 p.m., Wednesday

Interstate 20 West at I-59 South is still shut down after an afternoon cattle truck crash.

An overturned cattle truck has shut down Interstate 20 West at the I-59 South interchange, better known as “Dead Man’s Curve,” in Birmingham.

Fire officials say the driver of the truck was taken to the hospital with injuries that appeared to be minor.

Several cows were killed in the crash. Animal control has been called to the scene to help secure the livestock.

“The Cowboys” from Jemison are helping remove the cattle from the interstate.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Vermont's Top Cow Is a Flatlander | Bite Club – Seven Days – Seven Days

click to enlargeBlexy, Supreme Champion of the World Dairy Expo - COURTESY OF SHARYN ABBOTT

  • COURTESY OF SHARYN ABBOTT

  • Blexy, Supreme Champion of the World Dairy Expo

Beer and cheese made in Vermont have earned best-in-the-world accolades. Now another  product with Vermont ties — mightier (or at least heavier) than a bottle of beer or a wedge of cheese —  has won top honors.

Blexy, an 1,800-pound Holstein,  was named Supreme Champion of the
World Dairy Expo on October 7 in Madison, Wisc.  She bested about 2,300 animals to win the prize.

Blexy’s co-owners, Sharyn and Tim Abbott, live in Enosburg and operate a dairy farm and cattle breeding business in Richford, Borderview Genetics.

“Blexy’s extreme,” said Sharyn Abbott, 51, who grew up on a Holstein farm in Enosburg.  “She’s got a lot of strength, a lot of dairy character for the breed. And she’s got a real good udder.”

The Abbotts purchased Blexy, a 6-year-old milker, when she was 2.  They selected her for her genetics, Abbott said. Since that time, the Franklin County couple has acquired business partners who own shares of Blexy. The Abbotts own 25 percent of the champion Holstein, who lives on a farm in Wisconsin with one of her co-owners, Abbott said.

Thus, the top cow in Vermont is a flatlander. 

“They take exceptional care of this cow,” Abbott said of  Budjon Farms in Lomira, Wisc.  “She’s given the type of care she needs so she can excel at the shows. It’s like an athlete.”

A few of Blexy’s offspring live in Franklin County, including her daughter, Bliss, a milker at Borderview Genetics.

“She’s a very good individual,” Abbott said. “She’s following in her mother’s footsteps.”

Blexy has two primary roles:  She is a milker who produces about 150 pounds, or 20 gallons, of milk per day;  and she is a breeder who reproduces primarily through in-vitro fertilization. This involves removing ovarian cells called oocytes from Blexy and fertilizing them with bull semen in a petri dish. The resulting embryo is implanted in a “receptor” animal that carries the fetus to term.

This enables Blexy to reproduce at a greater rate than she would if she were pregnant for 283 days, a cow’s gestation period.  She will have an estimated 50 offspring over her lifetime, Abbott said.

“We can get more animals to market and put her genetics out there,” Abbott said.

The Supreme Champion of the World Dairy Expo is worth about $150,000, Abbott said.  Blexy’s owners and handlers celebrated her victory last weekend with a party at the expo.  Although Blexy is known for her milk, her people drank beer to toast the win.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Sacred Trust: Protesting The Indian Policies That Put Cows Ahead Of Women – Forbes

<div _ngcontent-c23 innerhtml="

Sujatro Ghosh

A woman and a cow have a stare-off

Imagine living in a society where a rapist and a murderer get away scot free, but eating beef results in death by stoning. Most of us couldn’t imagine living under such a dysfunctional bureaucracy, but if you are a woman living in India, you might have asked yourself at some point, “is it safer to be a cow than a woman?”

In 2012, the gang-rape and murder of a Delhi student, Jyoti Singh – posthumously known as Nirbhaya – sparked an international conversation about violence against women. Now, almost five years later, statistics demonstrate that reported rapes and sexual assaults have not significantly fallen in the country’s capital, with at least six rapes and 12 assaults being reported daily.

The issue of sexual violence isn’t unique to only India –&nbsp;far from it –&nbsp;but the problem gets compounded by the utter irony that, in India, you could get killed for hurting a cow.

A surge in incidents of vigilante violence against religious minorities and low-caste Hindus have swept the nation in the name of protecting cows, an animal considered sacred by many. And whilst people kill one another over the differences in their choice of dinner, they are ignoring the plight of an entire community; one that includes their wives, daughters, sisters and mothers.

Several states in India have banned the slaughtering of cows. In Gujarat, the crime can lead to a&nbsp;sentence of life imprisonment. Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, has also campaigned to ban cow slaughtering. But although he has condemned the mob killings, a member of his political party, the Bharatiya Janata Party, recently introduced the Cow Protection Bill, which would make the crime punishable by death.

Kolkata based artist and feminist, Sujatro Ghosh’s latest project encourages women to wear cow masks to protest the sexism that exists for women in his home country, proving to the government and extremists that women and men alike will not cower down to such double standards (no pun intended).

Sujatro Ghosh

Women in India wear cow masks to protect themselves as men look on.

“The core issue is women’s rights and protection,” said Ghosh. “I’m not against protecting cows, I love animals. But I’m concerned about my country’s socio-political scenario.”

In a humorous juxtaposition of the two trends, Ghosh effectively mocks the idiocrasy of the whole system, while showing solidarity with the victims of both, sexual and mob violence, and highlights the abysmal depths of our flawed society. A society which believes that women should be set alight if caught engaging in pre-marital activities, and individuals should be beaten to death for eating beef.

For all its symbolism of extolling the virtues of womanhood, there is a widespread violence engrained in Indian culture. A culture where girls are groomed to be good wives and dissuaded from having a career. They are seen as procreators, built for preserving Indian culture. And it is this very mentality that allows men to treat women as objects, easily controlled by their fathers and husbands. This cultural epidemic has made its way to a male-dominated parliament, where most politicians have other priorities, and many have charges of assault against women pending themselves.

Sujatro Ghosh

Sujatro Ghosh’s latest project is a silent protest against the Indian government.

As a result, we see men like Vijay Rupani, the Chief Minister of Gujarat, make incongruous claims in a bid to capitalize on Hindu nationalist fervor and get more votes by alienating the minority. It is then debatable whether the outcry is for the well-being of cows, or their own political gain.

“The protection of cows is the single-most important principle towards saving the whole world from both moral and spiritual degradation.”

– Vijay Rupani, Chief Minister of Gujarat

India is a nation where cattle are worshiped but the cattle class is forgotten about. If the same energy and legal attention towards cows was given towards women, perhaps we would see less rapists and fewer assaults. But it will not be until the mentality of men in the country is challenged to its core, will we witness progressive and positive change. Until men accept a woman’s increasing assertiveness and equal role within society, our rights will not be protected and our bodies will not be respected. In the meantime, we will have to resort to stirring up more beef to get our point across.

“>

Sujatro Ghosh

A woman and a cow have a stare-off

Imagine living in a society where a rapist and a murderer get away scot free, but eating beef results in death by stoning. Most of us couldn’t imagine living under such a dysfunctional bureaucracy, but if you are a woman living in India, you might have asked yourself at some point, “is it safer to be a cow than a woman?”

In 2012, the gang-rape and murder of a Delhi student, Jyoti Singh – posthumously known as Nirbhaya – sparked an international conversation about violence against women. Now, almost five years later, statistics demonstrate that reported rapes and sexual assaults have not significantly fallen in the country’s capital, with at least six rapes and 12 assaults being reported daily.

The issue of sexual violence isn’t unique to only India – far from it – but the problem gets compounded by the utter irony that, in India, you could get killed for hurting a cow.

A surge in incidents of vigilante violence against religious minorities and low-caste Hindus have swept the nation in the name of protecting cows, an animal considered sacred by many. And whilst people kill one another over the differences in their choice of dinner, they are ignoring the plight of an entire community; one that includes their wives, daughters, sisters and mothers.

Several states in India have banned the slaughtering of cows. In Gujarat, the crime can lead to a sentence of life imprisonment. Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, has also campaigned to ban cow slaughtering. But although he has condemned the mob killings, a member of his political party, the Bharatiya Janata Party, recently introduced the Cow Protection Bill, which would make the crime punishable by death.

Kolkata based artist and feminist, Sujatro Ghosh’s latest project encourages women to wear cow masks to protest the sexism that exists for women in his home country, proving to the government and extremists that women and men alike will not cower down to such double standards (no pun intended).

Sujatro Ghosh

Women in India wear cow masks to protect themselves as men look on.

“The core issue is women’s rights and protection,” said Ghosh. “I’m not against protecting cows, I love animals. But I’m concerned about my country’s socio-political scenario.”

In a humorous juxtaposition of the two trends, Ghosh effectively mocks the idiocrasy of the whole system, while showing solidarity with the victims of both, sexual and mob violence, and highlights the abysmal depths of our flawed society. A society which believes that women should be set alight if caught engaging in pre-marital activities, and individuals should be beaten to death for eating beef.

For all its symbolism of extolling the virtues of womanhood, there is a widespread violence engrained in Indian culture. A culture where girls are groomed to be good wives and dissuaded from having a career. They are seen as procreators, built for preserving Indian culture. And it is this very mentality that allows men to treat women as objects, easily controlled by their fathers and husbands. This cultural epidemic has made its way to a male-dominated parliament, where most politicians have other priorities, and many have charges of assault against women pending themselves.

Sujatro Ghosh

Sujatro Ghosh’s latest project is a silent protest against the Indian government.

As a result, we see men like Vijay Rupani, the Chief Minister of Gujarat, make incongruous claims in a bid to capitalize on Hindu nationalist fervor and get more votes by alienating the minority. It is then debatable whether the outcry is for the well-being of cows, or their own political gain.

“The protection of cows is the single-most important principle towards saving the whole world from both moral and spiritual degradation.”

– Vijay Rupani, Chief Minister of Gujarat

India is a nation where cattle are worshiped but the cattle class is forgotten about. If the same energy and legal attention towards cows was given towards women, perhaps we would see less rapists and fewer assaults. But it will not be until the mentality of men in the country is challenged to its core, will we witness progressive and positive change. Until men accept a woman’s increasing assertiveness and equal role within society, our rights will not be protected and our bodies will not be respected. In the meantime, we will have to resort to stirring up more beef to get our point across.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Carrie Fisher Once Sent a Cow's Tongue to a Producer Who Allegedly Assaulted Her Friend – NBCNews.com

As the scandal involving Harvey Weinstein continues to rock Hollywood, a screenwriter said she finally feels able to share her own story of survival — and the bold way actress Carrie Fisher came to her defense after she was allegedly sexually assaulted by a producer.

Screenwriter Heather Robinson said she and Fisher became friends after they met online in an AOL chat room where they would talk about the industry and workshop her screenplays. It was in that chat room that Robinson said she revealed an encounter she had with an award-winning producer, whom she declined to name.

Robinson said she never expected the actress’ response would come in the form of an animal part.

In an interview with Arizona radio program “The Morning Mix” that has gone viral, Robinson recalled a night in 2000 during which a producer allegedly sexually assaulted her after inviting her to dinner to discuss an upcoming project.

When it happened, it happened so quickly that I felt ashamed of myself,” Robinson said in the radio interview. She described how the producer picked her up in his car and, within minutes, pulled to the side of the road.

“He reaches over and grabs the handle of the chair of the passenger seat and pulls me backwards,” she said. “All of a sudden he’s on top of me and he has his right hand that was busy, and his left hand was on my chest, by my neck, holding me down.”

Robinson said she fought back, managed to escape the car, and ran. When she got home, she told her mom about the incident and debated whether or not she needed to go to the police. Ultimately, fearing for her safety, Robinson decided to remain silent.

Related: Will Flood of Weinstein Accusers Bring Sweeping Change to Hollywood?

Later that night, she said she saw that Fisher was online and told the “Star Wars” heroine what had happened in a series of messages.

“She stayed quiet and listened to me and then she said, ‘I promise you he will never touch you again,'” Robinson told NBC News in an email. “She was exactly what I needed. Someone to just hold space for me — allowing me to be scared, hurt, confused, angry.”

Weeks later, Robinson said Fisher messaged her online and told her that she’d hand-delivered the producer a gift: a cow tongue wrapped in a blue Tiffany’s box and topped with a bow.

“It was a cow’s tongue from Jerry’s Deli in Westwood with a note that said ‘If you ever touch my darling Heather or any other woman again, the next delivery will be something of yours in a much smaller box,’” Robinson said, adding that the “gift” made her laugh after the traumatizing incident.

Photos: Carrie Fisher: Actress, Author and ‘Princess’

“She had an amazing heart,” Robinson said in an email. “If you were one of the lucky people that she loved, she loved you with everything she had. In her world, it was okay to feel vulnerable because she made you feel safe in doing so. That alone is a huge gift.”

Robinson said she has never seen or heard from the producer again and that it took her years to realize that the assault was not her fault. But the Weinstein scandal has brought the conversation around sexual assault and harassment in Hollywood back into the spotlight, and Robinson said she’s happy to see women garnering support.

Related: Carrie Fisher Mourned by Fellow Stars: ‘Our Princess Has Passed Away’

Robinson said that, in part because of social media, she thinks women throughout the industry are feeling the same sense of safety and acceptance that Carrie gave her.

“It allows us the power to speak out and share our stories and to connect with other people who many not be at the point where I am,” she said. “It’s truly an individual journey and some may never shed light on what happened to them, and that is okay. As long as they see that they are not alone.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Dairy Products Prices Seen Going Up by 10% in 2017 – Novinite.com

Dairy products are by 10% more expensive this year compared to the prices in 2016, the State Commission on Commodity Exchanges and Markets said on 16th of October. In the BNT’s morning show, the chairman of the Commission, Vladimir Ivanov, said that largest increase was reported for the prices of butter but the prices of cheeses and yellow cheeses have gone up as well. According to experts, the main reason for this is the shortage of milk and the increase of its price in Bulgaria and on the European markets. Milk is the main source for making butter. In addition, the demand for milk is continuously increasing as it is the main ingredient to make chocolate.

Prices of cheese and dairy products have gone up by 9-10% compared to 2016 levels. Yogurt prices have increased by 3-5%.

Because of the more expensive dairy products, many people, especially in the villages, make their own cheese, butter and cottage cheese. It takes long but the products are delicious and of very good quality. Residents of the village of Tserovo, Blagoevgrad region, say 8 litres of milk are needed to prepare 1kg of cheese and 11 litres of milk to prepare 1 kg of yellow cheese. It is a lot, but it’s worth all the effort, they comment.

Source: The Bulgarian National Television

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Carrie Fisher Once Sent a Cow's Tongue to a Producer After He Sexually Assaulted Her Friend – PEOPLE.com

On screen she fought bad guys from a galaxy far, far away, but during her time on Earth, Carrie Fisher fought bad guys a lot closer to home.

The Star Wars actress’ longtime friend, Heather Ross, opened up to a Tucson, Arizona, radio station 94.9 MixFM about her own experiences with sexual assault and harassment in Hollywood, in the wake of the allegations leveled at producer Harvey Weinstein.

Ross revealed that an unnamed Oscar-winning producer (not Weinstein) had invited her for dinner and, when he picked her up, he pulled the car over and climbed in top of her, pinning her seat.

Courtesy Heather Robinson

Ross managed to push the producer off her but as she fled, he said, “You’ll never make a movie in my town and get the F out of my car,”, she told the radio show.

When Ross confided in her friend Fisher, the late actress took matters into her own hands.

RELATED VIDEO: Ashley Judd and Multiple Women Accuse Movie Mogul Harvey Weinstein of Sexual Harassment as He Announces Leave of Absence

“About two weeks later, she sent me a message online and she said, ‘I just saw [blank] at Sony Studios,” Ross said. “I knew he would probably be there, so I went to his office and personally delivered a Tiffany box wrapped with a white bow.”

Ross continued, “I asked her what was inside and she said, ‘It was a cow tongue from Jerry’s Famous Deli in Westwood with a note that said, ‘If you ever touch my darling Heather or any other woman again, the next delivery will be something of yours in a much smaller box!’”

Courtesy Heather Robinson

She added that knowing Fisher had her back left an impact on her.

“It felt validating to know, ‘Okay, first of all, this woman who I love as a friend was not just a fake Hollywood friend. That’s who she was. She spoke out and she put things out there in your face,” she said.

Multiple allegations of sexual misconduct and harassment against Weinstein, 65, came to light in an Oct. 5 New York Times exposé and were compounded by an investigation by the New Yorker.

Following the initial report, Weinstein said in a statement that he was working with therapists and planned to “deal with this issue head-on.” He has since been fired from his powerhouse studio, the Weinstein Company and kicked out of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences. His wife, Marchesa designer Georgina Chapman, has announced she’s leaving him.

Since the NYT article, several more women have leveled allegations of sexual misconduct against Weinstein, including Cara Delevingne, Gwyneth Paltrow and Angelina Jolie.

Of the accusations, a spokesperson for Weinstein previously told PEOPLE in a statement that “any allegations of non-consensual sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Lightning strike kills cow in Ladysmith – Ladysmith Gazette

According to bystanders, a cow walking near the dump yard allegedly collapsed as a lightning strike hit the ground near it on Monday (October 9) during a thunderstorm.

It is unclear if the cow was hit or died of fright. Residents from the area say that before the storm, the cow was alive and walking around.

After the storm, the cow was found dead.

On Tuesday, the cow’s carcass was still there and had not been removed.

Also read: Watch: Cow trapped in mud and water near Protea Bridge, Ladysmith

Residents say that some people from the area tried to remove the cow, but failed and the carcass was left where it lay.

Residents ask why so many cattle are roaming around the residential area, and what can be done to have the cattle removed.

Click to receive news links via WhatsApp. Or  for the latest news, visit our webpage or follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Join us there!

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

We Are Against Cow Vigilantism, Attacks On Dalits: Vijay Rupani – NDTV

New Delhi:  Gujarat Chief Minister Vijay Rupani today said his government was against people taking the law in their hands under the pretext of saving cows from slaughter.”We do not support those who commit violence in the name of gau raksha (cow protection). Action will be taken against those responsible,” Mr Rupani said in an event organised by India TV.

“At the same time, the government is ensuring protection of cows for which we have a law, which is the strictest in the country. It also has the provision for life sentence,” the Gujarat chief minister said.

Cases of groups of people stopping vehicles on suspicion of transporting cow meat have been reported from across the country in recent times. People have been beaten and some even allegedly killed by such vigilante groups.

The first incident of cow vigilantism was reported from Dadri in Uttar Pradesh in 2015, in which Mohammad Akhlaq was beaten to death after allegations that he had killed a cow. In July last year, four Dalit men were stripped, tied to a car and flogged in Gujarat.

As reports of similar incidents from other states piled up, Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his union ministers issued strong statements against cow vigilantism. Condemning cow vigilantes, PM Modi said, “I have seen that some people are into crimes all night and wear the garb of gau rakshaks in the day”.

At the event today, referring to reported attacks on Dalits, Vijay Rupani said police are filing cases and taking swift action whenever such cases are reported. “It is our responsibility to protect Dalits… We are ensuring safety and welfare of Dalits in Gujarat. That is why they support the BJP,” he said.

Mr Rupani said his government has started withdrawing cases filed against Patidars. “We have already withdrawn 300 cases so far,” he said.
 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link