A Conundrum in Cull Cow Prices – Drovers Magazine

U.S. Federally Inspected (FI) cow slaughter cow slaughter has been running above a year ago, with both beef and dairy components increasing. Year-to-date (through the week ending April 13th), daily average FI cow slaughter was up 7% from a year ago with beef and dairy cow components up 10% and 5%, respectively. Nationally, cow slaughter levels are expected to remain above 2017’s until midsummer, and maybe longer.

Even with increased harvest levels, the Cutter cow cutout value has been above 2017’s. That wholesale carcass equivalent value is calculated weekly by USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS). Typically, the wholesale value would increase seasonally, brought on by higher demand for ground beef. However, that wholesale value has been flat all year and has had a limiting effect on cull cow prices.

USDA-AMS, under the mandatory livestock reporting program, compiles from packers a national weekly direct cow and bull report on negotiated dressed prices (delivered to plant), it also contains a regional breakdown. The national average cull cow price so far this year has been below 2017’s. Yearto-date (16-weeks), the average heavy carcass (500-pounds and heavier) price has been $125.66 per cwt., that is down $3.83 (3.0%) from a year earlier. The price of lighter carcasses (400- to-500-pound) also has declined, slipping $4.19 per cwt. (-3.3%). Imports of slaughter cows, too, have been below a year ago contributing to this puzzle.

Regionally, for 500-pound and heavier carcasses, the South Central states (TX, OK, NE, KS, and CO) so far this year averaged 3.8% below 2017’s. In the eastern 26 states, which are reported as a category by AMS (from Vermont to Florida to Indiana), prices declined 5.3%. The north central region (NE, WY, MT, SD, and ND) this year’s price averaged down 2.3%, while the Midwest (MO, IA, MN, WI, IL) slipped 6.4%. In one region, slaughter cow prices have been higher year-over-year; that is the west (AZ, NV, UT, CA, ID, OR, and WA) where the rise was 6.9%. In May 2017, CS Beef completed construction and began operations of their new state-of-the-art packing plant. Clearly, competition for animals in that region has increased cull cow prices.

There are two keys to cull cow prices for the balance of this year; both are supply-related. First, low milk price is persisting and could increase slaughter even more than expected. Of course, drought conditions could expand this summer, causing more beef cows to be culled earlier than normal.

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VIDEO: Angry cow charges at Texas deputy – News 5 Cleveland – News 5 Cleveland

When police officers and sheriff’s deputies sign up to serve and protect, catching an angry cow is probably not one of the things they expect to be part of the job.

An angry cow was caught on dash cam charging at a Texas deputy while police were responding to a call of a cow that had possibly been hit by a car.

But the only thing wrong with the cow was a bad attitude.

After a few passes, the cow headed into the woods.

The constable’s office said no deputy or cow was injured.

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Speedy Texas Deputy Avoids Hard-Charging Cow – U.S. News & World Report

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Dallas News

Speedy Texas Deputy Avoids Hard-Charging Cow
U.S. News & World Report
A Texas deputy constable proved he's fleet of foot while facing down an agile cow that had a beef with motorists along a rural road. April 28, 2018, at 1:43 p.m.. Speedy Texas Deputy Avoids Hard-Charging Cow. Share. ×. Share on Facebook · Post on
Watch: Agile cow chases deputy investigating crash near HoustonDallas News
Caught on Tape: Angry cow charges cops during traffic stopWSMV Nashville

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COW CHASE: Dashcam captures livestock hit by car charging at deputy – KTRK-TV

HUFFMAN, Texas (KTRK) —

This was one chase that had a deputy moo-ving.

According to the Harris County Precinct 3 Constable’s office, one of the department’s deputies was caught on camera being chased around by a cow that may have been hit by a vehicle.

Deputy Andrew Ries encountered the cow shortly after his shift began along FM-2100 in the Huffman area. Ries saw two vehicles parked on the shoulder, prompting him to stop to investigate a possible accident, according to the constable’s office.

Instead, the motorists told Ries that another vehicle had hit a cow, which appeared to be uninjured.

However, as seen on his dashcam video, the downed cow started stirring and charged at Ries as he was backing away. The deputy is seen running around his patrol vehicle.

The animal then charged at him some more, and the deputy is seen running out of view. The cow eventually went into the woods, never to be seen again.

Ries returned to his vehicle and left after braving the bovine.

“We can handle criminals with no problem,” remarked Constable Sherman Eagleton’s office on Facebook. “But when it comes to livestock….it’s no bull!”

The constable’s office added no humans, animals or patrol cars were damaged in the cow encounter.

(Copyright ©2018 KTRK-TV. All Rights Reserved.)

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Disturbing 'Game of Thrones' Secrets Every Die-Hard Fan Should Know – The Cheat Sheet

Games of Thrones relies on a lot of tricks in order to come out with its crazy scenes. After all, the show notably has had so many death scenes and they had to get creative to depict those gruesome killings. But the most disturbing trivia behind the show doesn’t just revolve around death.

Actors have since talked about weird things they had worn for the show that will probably make you look at their cool costumes a little differently (pages 4 and 8). Also, one of the show’s biggest stars had a pretty crazy prank done to him (page 6). Those are just some of the show’s craziest secrets.

Here are 10 disturbing Game of Thrones secrets every die-hard fan should know.

1. Emilia Clarke got stuck to a toilet while covered in fake blood

Daenerys Targaryen in Game of Thrones

Daenerys Targaryen in Game of Thrones Even with a fake heart, this sounds gross. | HBO

Daenerys Targaryen had the memorable scene where she ate a horse’s heart. That involved her being covered in a lot of blood that led to something strange afterward.

“It was kind of like a gummy bear,” Emilia Clarke told Jimmy Kimmel. “But covered in fake blood that tasted sort of like bleach, which was gross.” She then continued, “Then there was a moment when we were filming it that I disappeared, and I was stuck to the toilet.”

That wasn’t the only gross part of doing the scene. Clarke revealed she ate about 28 hearts to get it right. “They made the heart out of solidified jam but it tasted like bleach and raw pasta,” she told The Mirror. “Fortunately, they gave me a spit bucket because I was vomiting in it quite often.”

Next: This actor really skinned an animal.

This pet cow loves TV, beach days and his family – WMUR Manchester

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WMUR Manchester

This pet cow loves TV, beach days and his family
WMUR Manchester
Madden had been raising horses all her life, but she wanted a cow ever since she was a little girl. Finn seems to be the perfect fit; at only 43 inches high, he is small enough to be both an indoor and outdoor pet. "He's a part of our family, and

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Fall Calving Herd: Cow-Calf Profitability Expectations for Spring … – Drovers Magazine

Spring is the time of year when fall calving cow-calf operations wean their fall-born calves and summer stocker operators place calves into summer grazing programs. The purpose of this article will be to examine the profitability of cow-calf operations that have recently sold, or will soon sell, their fall born calves. A very similar article was written last year that took this same basic approach and overall profitability is very similar to where it was at that time.

Table 1 summarizes estimated spring 2018 costs and returns to a traditional fall-calving cow-calf operation. Every operation is different, so producers should modify these estimates to fit their situation. Average weaning weight is assumed to be 550 lbs and the steer / heifer average calf price is assumed to be $1.45 per pound. This price is based on the mid-April 2018 market, which actually decreased slightly from March. Weaning rate is assumed to be 90%, meaning that it is expected that a calf will be weaned and sold from 90% of the cows that are managed and exposed to a bull. This is a relatively high weaning rate as this analysis will generally assume a well-managed operation and reflects more favorable weather during the breeding and calving seasons for fall calving cows. Based on these assumptions, calf revenue per cow is $718.

The pasture stocking rate is assumed to be 2 acres per cow-calf unit and pasture maintenance costs are assumed to be relatively low. At $25 per acre, this would include one pasture clipping and seeding some legumes on a portion of the pasture acres each year. Producers who apply fertilizer to pasture ground would likely see much higher pasture maintenance costs and these costs should be adjusted accordingly. Producers should also consider the stocking rates for their operation as this will vary greatly, especially for fall calving herds. Stocking rate impacts the number of grazing days and winter feeding days for the operation, which has large implications for costs on a per cow basis.

The primary cost difference between a fall-calving herd and a spring-calving herd is winter feed. Since fall calving cows are lactating during the winter, their nutrient requirements are higher when stored feed is typically fed. For the initial purposes of this analysis, fall calving cows are assumed to consume 2.5 tons of hay through the winter and that hay is valued at $90 per ton. This hay value is considerably above “market” price in most areas, but is high due to the greater hay quality needs of fall calving cows. In some settings, fall calving cows may be fed lower quality hay, in which case weaning weights (and revenues per cow) would be lower. An alternative strategy for some operations might be to feed lower quality hay and supplement cows during the winter. If this is done, both the cost of the supplemental feed and the additional feeding labor should be considered. Regardless, winter nutrient needs are higher for fall calving cows, and this comes at an additional cost. Mineral cost is set at $35 per cow, veterinary / medicine costs $25, trucking costs $10, machinery costs $20 (primarily for feeding hay as this does not include machinery for hay production or pasture clipping as they are included in those respective costs), and other costs $25. Marketing costs are assumed to be $30 per cow, but larger operations may market cattle in larger groups and pay lower commission rates.

Breeding stock depreciation is a key cost that is often overlooked. Breeding stock depreciate just like any other asset on the farm. For example, if the “typical” cow entered the herd as a bred heifer valued at $1,700 and her expected cull value was $700, then she would depreciate $1,000 over her productive lifetime. If we assume a typical cow has 8 productive years, then annual cow depreciation is $125 using a straight line depreciation method. This is the assumption made in this analysis, but the actual depreciation will vary across farms. When buying bred replacement heifers, this cost is obvious. With farm-raised replacements, this cost should be the revenue foregone if the heifer had been sold with the other calves, plus all expenses incurred (feed, breeding, pasture rent, etc.) to reach the same stage as a purchased bred heifer.

Finally, breeding costs are assumed to be $40 per cow and are one of the most misunderstood costs on a cow calf operation. Breeding cost on a per cow basis should include annual depreciation of the bull and bull maintenance costs, spread across the number of cows he services. For example, if a bull is purchased for $3,500 and sold two years later for $2,500, the bull depreciated $500 each year. Then, if his maintenance costs were $500 per year (feed, pasture, vet / med, etc.), his ownerships costs are $1,000 per year. If that bull covers 25 cows, breeding cost per cow is $40. A similar approach can be used for AI, but producers should be careful to include multiple rounds of AI for some cows and the ownership costs of a cleanup bull, if one is used. Breeding costs per cow may be much higher for many operations as these assumptions are likely conservative.

Note that based on our assumptions, total expenses per cow are roughly $585 and revenues per cow are $718. So, estimated return to land, labor, capital, and management is $133 per cow managed. This is very similar to our estimates for spring 2017. At first glance, this return can be misleading, so some additional discussion is warranted. A number of costs were intentionally not included in this analysis because they vary greatly across operations. Notice that no value is placed on the time spent working and managing the operation, no depreciation on facilities, equipment, fences, or other capital items is included, and no interest (opportunity cost) is charged on any capital investments including land, facilities, and the cattle themselves. So, the return needs to be thought of as a return to the operator’s time, equipment, facilities, land, and capital.

As one thinks about quantifying these additional costs, it likely makes sense to start with land. Cow-calf operators should at least cover the rental potential of that pasture ground. Similarly, there is a great deal of capital investment on a cow-calf operation in facilities, fencing, and equipment that should be considered. Finally, a cow-calf operator should expect some return to the time they spend managing the operation. This might be best illustrated by using a simple, bare-bones illustration. At a relatively low land rental rate of $30 per acre, this would represent another $60 per cow in opportunity cost given the two acres per cow stocking rate. A similarly low $50 per cow estimate for depreciation and interest on equipment, fencing, facilities, etc. (this would not include hay equipment as hay is valued at market price in the analysis) and $30 value for the operator’s labor and management, would suggest that return to land, capital, labor, and management would need to be $140 per cow. Again, these numbers are likely low and variable across operations, but thinking through them is important to understanding current cow-calf profitability. Put simply, well-managed fall calving herds are likely covering cash costs and breeding stock depreciation right now, but are not likely receiving anything but minimal returns to the their capital investment, labor, and management.

Table 1: Estimated Returns to Fall Calving Cow-calf Operation: Spring 2018
           
Revenues
Steer / Heifer Calf Average   550 lbs $1.45 $798
Discount for Open Cows   10% open   $80
Total Revenues per Cow $718
         
Expenses        
Pasture Maintenance 2.0 acres $25.00 $50
Hay 2.5 tons $90.00 $225
Mineral       $35
Vet       $25
Breeding       $40
Marketing       $30
Machinery       $20
Trucking       $10
Breeding Stock Depreciation       $125
Other       $25
Total Expenses per Cow $585
 
Return to Land, Labor, and Capital $133

It is likely that the two most variable factors impacting cow-calf profitability are calf prices and hay / winter feed costs. So, table 2 shows estimated returns to this same fall calving cow-calf operation given a range of winter feed costs and calf prices. Note that the center of the table, which represents a steer / heifer average price of $1.45 and hay costs of $225 per cow perfectly matches the detailed budget shown in table 1. From there, calf prices are increased and decreased by $0.10 and $0.20 per lb.

Winter feed costs are increased and decreased by $50 per cow in table 2. This is done to capture a wider range of hay costs, winter feeding days, or other nutritional approaches employed by the cow-calf operator. For example, at 2.5 tons per cow through the winter, a $50 increase in winter feed cost would value hay $20 higher per ton and a $50 decrease in winter feed costs would value hay at $20 less per ton. Producers should consider where their operation likely lies on table 2 to better estimate their likely profit levels in this environment. Both tables 1 and 2 should help producers understand current returns to a fall calving cow-calf operation.

Table 2: Estimated Returns to Fall Calving Cow-Calf Operation given Winter Feed Costs and Calf Prices: Spring 2018
  Avg. Steer/Heifer Price, 550 lbs
Winter Feed Costs $1.25 $1.35 $1.45 $1.55 $1.65
$175 $84 $133 $183 $232 $282
$225 $34 $83 $133 $182 $232
$275 -$16 $33 $83 $132 $182
Note: Returns above are returns to land, labor, and capital based on the same assumptions used in Table 1.

Much like last year, it appears that fall-calving herds are likely covering their cash costs and breeding stock depreciation. However, each operator should also consider what return they need to adequately compensate them for their investment in land, capital (including depreciation), labor, and management. For example, if a producer felt that they needed a minimum of $140 return to compensate them for their time and investment as was previously discussed, our initial estimates in table 1 suggest that we are not reaching that level. Once enough producers start to feel this way, we will start to see herd liquidation in response to unsustainable profit levels over time. In the meantime, cow-calf operations should work to better understand their cost structure and what calf prices are needed to reach their profit goals. This will help them determine their best strategy as they make long-term decisions about their cowherds.

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Fuzzy cow slays in laidback photoshoot on the beach – Metro

Ugh, don’t you just hate it when someone shares pictures of you hanging out at the beach that haven’t been cast over by your creative eye?

We’re talking about a genuine candid, free of any posing and smizing, when you had already chosen you exact set-up for the perfect laidback plandid.

It’s maddening.

This fuzzy cow feels your pain.

A highland cow was photographed strolling along Clachtoll beach in Lochinver, Scotland, while clearly scoping out the ideal backdrop for its Instagram thirstraps.

Clearly without a decent Instagram husband, the cow was instead photographed by Margaret Harrison, 52, who said it was the first time she’d seen a highland cow taking a paddle in the sea.

Fuzzy cow slays in plandid photoshoot on the beach
(Picture: Margaret Harrison / SWNS.com

Thankfully, the cow still slayed it. Look at those beachy waves. That pose. The powerful look to the camera.

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‘I have been visiting the area for years – we have a static caravan there,’ said Margaret.

‘It was the Easter holidays and it was a gorgeous day. You often see cows on the beach but not normally that near the water.

More: Health

‘I was just leaving the beach as the cow walked down to the water, so I decided to follow it and get some pictures, and then it started eating the seaweed.

‘It was absolutely lovely – there was no one around.’

Oh, so as well as taking pictures Margaret just spilled the cow’s snacking habits. Can they have some privacy, please?

Do enjoy the cow’s artful, totally unplanned, photoshoot below.

If you don’t love me when I’m eating seaweed alone…

A lone Highland Cow on Clachtoll beach, Lochinver, in the Scottish Highlands. See Centre Press story CPCOW; A highland cow has been caught on camera making the most of the Scottish sun as it headed down to the beach to snack on some seaweed. Margaret Harrison, 52, was joined on Clachtoll beach, Lochinver, in the Scottish Highlands by the lonesome cow. It wandered down to the water's edge to munch on the salty seaweed. Margaret, who was on holiday from Birmingham, has been visiting the area for years and said she has seen highland cows from nearby walking along the beach before. But the mother of four said this the first time she has ever seen one of the cows take a dip in the water. She said:
(Picture: Margaret Harrison / SWNS.com)

…You don’t deserve me when my Instagram likes reach the triple digits

A lone Highland Cow on Clachtoll beach, Lochinver, in the Scottish Highlands. See Centre Press story CPCOW; A highland cow has been caught on camera making the most of the Scottish sun as it headed down to the beach to snack on some seaweed. Margaret Harrison, 52, was joined on Clachtoll beach, Lochinver, in the Scottish Highlands by the lonesome cow. It wandered down to the water's edge to munch on the salty seaweed. Margaret, who was on holiday from Birmingham, has been visiting the area for years and said she has seen highland cows from nearby walking along the beach before. But the mother of four said this the first time she has ever seen one of the cows take a dip in the water. She said:
(Picture: Margaret Harrison / SWNS.com)

Work. It.

A lone Highland Cow on Clachtoll beach, Lochinver, in the Scottish Highlands. See Centre Press story CPCOW; A highland cow has been caught on camera making the most of the Scottish sun as it headed down to the beach to snack on some seaweed. Margaret Harrison, 52, was joined on Clachtoll beach, Lochinver, in the Scottish Highlands by the lonesome cow. It wandered down to the water's edge to munch on the salty seaweed. Margaret, who was on holiday from Birmingham, has been visiting the area for years and said she has seen highland cows from nearby walking along the beach before. But the mother of four said this the first time she has ever seen one of the cows take a dip in the water. She said:
(Picture: Margaret Harrison / SWNS.com)

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This one’s Facebook cover photo worthy

A lone Highland Cow on Clachtoll beach, Lochinver, in the Scottish Highlands. See Centre Press story CPCOW; A highland cow has been caught on camera making the most of the Scottish sun as it headed down to the beach to snack on some seaweed. Margaret Harrison, 52, was joined on Clachtoll beach, Lochinver, in the Scottish Highlands by the lonesome cow. It wandered down to the water's edge to munch on the salty seaweed. Margaret, who was on holiday from Birmingham, has been visiting the area for years and said she has seen highland cows from nearby walking along the beach before. But the mother of four said this the first time she has ever seen one of the cows take a dip in the water. She said:
(Picture: Margaret Harrison / SWNS.com)

Slay, queen

A lone Highland Cow on Clachtoll beach, Lochinver, in the Scottish Highlands. See Centre Press story CPCOW; A highland cow has been caught on camera making the most of the Scottish sun as it headed down to the beach to snack on some seaweed. Margaret Harrison, 52, was joined on Clachtoll beach, Lochinver, in the Scottish Highlands by the lonesome cow. It wandered down to the water's edge to munch on the salty seaweed. Margaret, who was on holiday from Birmingham, has been visiting the area for years and said she has seen highland cows from nearby walking along the beach before. But the mother of four said this the first time she has ever seen one of the cows take a dip in the water. She said:
(Picture: Margaret Harrison / SWNS)

We bow to you, ruler of beach photoshoots.

MORE: Meghan Markle’s eyebrow stylist tells us how to get royal brows

MORE: Why does Prince George always wear shorts?

MORE: These are the most right-swiped people on Tinder

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Did a Prehistoric Brain Surgeon Practice on This Cow? – Smithsonian

One of the more astonishing facts about prehistoric humans is how early they went under the knife—or rather, the sharpened stone.

Starting at least 7,000 years ago, people practiced a procedure called trepanation, which involved punching or scraping a hole in the skull for medical or spiritual reasons. Now, reports Nicola Davis at The Guardian, researchers have found evidence that humans may have been performing the same procedure on cows, either as practice or as early veterinary medicine.

As Ashley Strickland at CNN reports, between 1975 and 1985, researchers were excavating the Neolithic site in France called Champ-Durand, which served as a trade center that focused on salt and cattle between 3,400 and 3,000 B.C.E. They found the bones of many domestic animals, but they also uncovered something relatively rare: a nearly complete skull of a cow with a hole drilled in it.

Stone Age humans used the whole animal, commonly crushing the cranium to extract the animal’s tongue and brain. This means that intact skulls from that period are fairly unusual. But researchers were initially unimpressed with the find, suggesting the skull’s prominent hole was merely a gore mark from another cow. But a recent reexamination of the skull suggests that ancient humans purposefully made the marks. They published their findings in the journal Scientific Reports.

This most recent examination suggests the hole was not inflicted by another animal due to a lack of other cracks or associated trauma to the skull. Microscopic scans ruled out a tumor, gnawing mice or other similar causes. Cut and scrape marks directly around the wound suggest purposeful creation. But since there was no healing around the bone, researchers surmise that the animal likely died from the procedure or was dead when it happened.

“I have analyzed many, many human skulls … all from the Neolithic period and they all show the same techniques,” Fernando Ramirez Rozzi of the French National Centre for Scientific Research in Paris and first author of the study tells Davis, “and the technique you can observe in the cow’s skull [is] the same.”

The big question is why a Stone Age surgeon might cut a hole in the head of a cow. As Strickland reports, cattle were very common at Champ-Durand, comprising over fifty percent of the bones found. It’s unlikely that the locals would go to the trouble of trying to save one ailing cow. As Rozzi inquires: “What would be the interest to heal a cow which represent the most abundant animal among the archaeological remains?”

The other possibility is that a budding surgeon used the animal for practice. Many trepanations found in the archaeological record appear to be surprisingly precise and in some cases patients survived the procedure. It’s possible that practicing on animals was the way these surgeons developed their skills.

This leaves one big question: Why were people drilling into one another’s skulls 5,000 years ago in the first place?

As Robin Wylie at the BBC reports, this is a hotly debated topic. The Victorians believed the procedure was used to relieve migraine headaches, an idea that has since been debunked. Still, some researchers argue that it was primarily a medical intervention used to treat pain or neurological conditions as Stone Age humans understood them. It’s hard to say since many of those medical conditions don’t leave evidence in the skull.

Others believe there is evidence for trepanation used as a ritual. As Wylie reports, archaeologists in Russia have found the remains of 12 healthy adults, all of whom had a hole cut in their skull in an extremely dangerous area. Four died soon after the surgery. The other eight lived at least four years with the holes in their head. The researchers argue that these unusual trepanations were likely used not to heal disease but to give these people supernatural powers or connections.

Whatever the reason, trepanations was not an uncommon practice—with evidence found throughout Europe, Africa, Asia and even in the Americas. Versions of the procedure were used by the ancient Greeks and through the European Renaissance.

Today, it remains a valid way to relieve pressure in the brain under emergency situations. So we just might have cows to thank for helping early humans sharpen their skills in early versions of this procedure.

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UMPQUA DAIRY PRODUCTS JUDGED BEST IN THE NORTHWEST – kqennewsradio.com

April 20, 2018 10:50 a.m.

In the KQEN Business Spotlight:

Five products from Umpqua Dairy have been judged to be the best in the northwest.

That announcement was made at the recent 107th annual Oregon Dairy Industries Conference.

A release from Umpqua Dairy says they received the Sweepstakes Award in both Ice Cream and Cultured Products judging competition. The company’s cottage cheese, buttermilk, sour cream, vanilla ice cream and chocolate ice cream were judged the best in the northwest. Umpqua Dairy was also awarded second place for chocolate milk in the Fluid Milk Division.

The dairy products were judged by an independent judging team from Oregon State University and the dairy industry. The release says they were judged on flavor, appearance, body and texture. Sweepstakes awards were given to the single company that scored highest overall in judging in each of the various product categories.

Director of Plant Operations John Harvey says the company is “thrilled to once again bring home the sweepstakes trophy for our ice cream, as well as the sweepstakes award for our cultured products”. Harvey says to be honored with such awards by their peers is “the highest compliment one can receive”.

Umpqua Dairy remains the largest independent dairy in southern Oregon.

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