Stunning treehouse retreat in Rwanda sets a new standard for ecotourism – Inhabitat

Rwanda’s unbelievable Bisate Lodge is a stunning example of how to build in a natural landscape without causing harm. Constructed into an eroded volcanic cone, the pod-like villas – which were designed by Johannesburg-based architectural firm, Nicholas Plewman in collaboration with interior designers, Caline Williams-Wynn and Nilfah Adams from Artichoke – are surrounded by lush forest with views of the volcanic landscape. The lodge is part of an effort to honor the local culture while restoring the indigenous forest.

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Designed to pay homage to the Rwandan culture and natural landscape, the eco-retreat is located near the Volcanoes National Park Headquarters and is part of a pioneering onsite indigenous reforestation project. Only six thatched-roof villas are located on the expansive 103-acre resort, which was built into a natural cavernous space in an overgrown volcanic cone.

Related: 7 eco-friendly and conservation-minded safari lodges across Africa

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Wanting to create an authentic Rwandan style, the resort’s overall interior design, which was led by designers, Caline Williams-Wynn and Nilfah Adams from Artichoke, was inspired by indigenous tradition. Much of the interior design includes an abundance of colorful prints and varying textures that were chosen to represent the local style. In fact, Teta Isibo, local fashion entrepreneur and founder of Inzuki Designs and one of Africa’s 30 Most Promising Young Entrepreneurs for 2017 also collaborated on the design process.

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Various sustainable features – such as chandeliers made of recycled glass and volcanic stone fireplaces – are found throughout the eco retreat. Local touches such as the traditional milk jug motif are used throughout the space, and cow hides were used as rugs to represent the rural life in local villages. Additionally, items made from the traditional art process called , where cow dung is mixed with soils of different colors and painted into geometric shapes, are also found in the interior.

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Operated by sustainable ecotourism operator, Wilderness Safaris, construction of the Bisate Lodge was an ecological process throughout. According to the COO Grant Woodrow, the company put strategic care into building something that would enhance the area rather than harm it, “We wanted to ensure that our brand of responsible ecotourism made a real difference to both rural Rwandan people and biodiversity conservation.” Reservations for this amazing eco lodge can be made through Thousand Hills Africa.

+ Nick Plewman

+ Wilderness Safaris

Via Dwell

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Consumers want antibiotic-free chicken. Can companies and farmers afford it? – Atlanta Magazine

In this excerpt from her new book Big Chicken, Atlanta journalist Maryn McKenna explores how consumer demand is forcing huge companies, such as Perdue and Chick-fil-A, to go antibiotic-free

September 2017Atlanta Magazine

Big Chicken

Photograph © Chris Williams/Blackbox

The first pages of Big Chicken are terrifying. Maryn McKenna examines the case of a 51-year-old man named Rick Schiller, who was admitted to a California emergency room in 2013 with a fever and his right leg puffed up to three times its normal size. The swelling was so severe, in fact, that the doctor thought his skin might split. It wasn’t until the doctor inserted a needle the size of a pencil lead—the third needle she tried—and withdrew the plunger that something started coming out. Schiller looked down in horror. “The barrel was filled with something red and heavy,” McKenna writes. “He thought it looked like meat.”

Schiller was the victim of a salmonella outbreak that had sickened hundreds of Americans across 29 states. Not only was this outbreak linked to chicken, but the strain of salmonella was also stubbornly resistant to the normal courses of antibiotics that would otherwise have knocked it out.

As McKenna explains in Big Chicken, the growing emergence of “superbugs”—bacteria immune to even the strongest antibiotics—is not just a natural consequence of over-prescribing them in humans, but also of feeding them to chickens to fatten them up faster. Indeed, most antibiotics sold in the United States go to chickens to make them gain weight. McKenna, who spent a decade covering the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, dives deep into the history of how scientists first made the connection between antibiotics and animal farming, and the results it’s had on factory farming today. The news isn’t all bad—impelled by a more educated consumer, big buyers of poultry are demanding that farmers grow their chickens without antibiotics.


Big Chicken by Maryn McKenna
Big Chicken

Big Chicken published by National Geographic Partners, LLC, September 12, 2017. Copyright © 2017 by Maryn McKenna

An excerpt from Big Chicken
From the first generation of the food movement in the 1970s, small local companies—Bread & Circus in Massachusetts, for instance, and Mrs. Gooch’s in California—had competed to buy and offer what at the time were limited supplies of organic meat and poultry. (“Organic” mostly overlaps with “antibiotic-free,” though the federal National Organic Standards created by USDA in 2002 ban antibiotics only from the second day of a broiler’s life.) On the supply side, sausage maker Applegate Farms was a pioneer; it began making antibiotic-free cured and processed meats in the 1990s. In food service, Panera Bread Co. began serving antibiotic-free chicken in 2004. But it was really the success of Whole Foods Market, founded in 1980, and Chipotle Mexican Grill, founded in 1993, that demonstrated how large the market for meat raised without antibiotics was likely to be.

Whole Foods pledged “no antibiotics” from the start, saying it would refuse animals that received growth promoters or preventive dosing, as well as animals that had received antibiotics to cure diseases. Chipotle founded its operations on a promise of “Food With Integrity”: locally grown produce and meats from animals that lived in good welfare conditions and did not receive antibiotics. Both of those companies did so well that they were able to create their own supply chains of produce growers, processed-food makers, and livestock farmers; Whole Foods brought additional farmers into antibiotic-free growing by offering farm loans.

Their success did not immediately persuade very large food businesses to follow them; selling meat raised without antibiotics seemed as much a niche market as organic produce once had been. But out of public view, companies were perceiving the market growing and laying groundwork to enter it. The first to go public, beating Perdue’s announcement by months, was one that almost no one would have predicted. In February 2014, the Southern sandwich chain Chick-fil-A declared that it would relinquish all antibiotics in its chicken within five years.

Chick-fil-A’s headquarters lies just outside Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. The company is privately held and openly Christian. It requires its restaurants to close on Sunday; its corporate motto, “To glorify God by being a faithful steward of all that is entrusted to us,” is engraved on a plaque outside the headquarters’ front door. Its chief executive officer generated tremendous publicity, most of it negative, by expressing biblically based opposition to same-sex marriage. But in a quiet, Southern way, Chick-fil-A is a poultry powerhouse. By sales, it is both the eighth-largest fast food chain in the United States and the largest with a menu based on chicken. Its sales are larger than the U.S. division of rival KFC, and its individual locations earn more per restaurant than McDonald’s.

Chicken is all that Chick-fil-A sells, barring beverages and salads and a few outlier breakfast items; its menu includes no burgers, no chili, no fried fish or shrimp. So the company keeps a close eye on where consumer preferences are headed. Thirty years after Whole Foods opened and almost 20 years after Chipotle debuted, those leanings were visibly shifting—not just in the choices of individual shoppers but also in the contracts written by big institutional buyers, which can create or change markets. In 2010, a coalition of 300 hospitals across the country announced they would no longer buy meat raised with routine antibiotic use. In 2011, the Chicago Public Schools, the third-largest school district in the country, converted to antibiotic-free chicken. In 2013, the academic senate of the University of California San Francisco (which, in addition to the university, operates the city’s largest hospital) voted for its food procurement to go antibiotic-free and urged the rest of the University of California system to follow its lead.

Chick-fil-A’s announcement was the first signal that poultry production was breaking with the rest of the American meat industry; Perdue’s, seven months later, was the second. One after another, major food service companies and poultry integrators fell in line behind them. McDonald’s shook the market by announcing in March 2015 that it was going antibiotic-free for chicken in all of its North American restaurants; Subway followed in October 2015. Costco put its buying power behind chicken raised without routine antibiotics in March 2015, and Walmart in May 2015. Poultry producer Pilgrim’s Pride said in April 2015 that it would take 25 percent of its birds antibiotic-free. Foster Farms, the company that had been dogged by foodborne illness outbreaks, committed in June 2015. And Tyson Foods, the largest chicken company in North America, announced in April 2015 that it had already eliminated human use antibiotics in 80 percent of its broiler production (including its hatcheries), with the plan of being antibiotic-free within two years.

Though they all phrased their moves as relinquishing routine antibiotics, the companies were not all committing to the same actions. Tyson continued to use ionophores, the drug family that the European Union had allowed in chickens when it banned growth promoters; McDonald’s said it would accept use of those drugs by its suppliers. But Perdue committed to doing away with ionophores. Chick-fil-A, which buys chicken from Perdue and four other major companies, set a strict standard. It told its suppliers that it would not be acceptable to use antibiotics at any point in a bird’s life—not even ionophores and not even for treatment of illness. Suppliers would have to undergo an annual audit to prove compliance.

Implementing that was not simple, and what Chick-fil-A went through to secure antibiotic-free chicken illustrates how the turn away from conventional raising will challenge the poultry industry. But the company presented its decision as a move the market demanded; in proprietary research, 70 percent of its customers said they were concerned about antibiotic use on farms. Chick-fil-A could try to lead the way or be left behind.

Chick-fil-A estimates that it buys roughly 250 million pounds of chicken per year. Before making its announcement, the chain’s leadership met with all five of its poultry suppliers to see if they could meet the demand.

“In a perfect world, we’d be able to flip a switch,” David Farmer, the chain’s vice president for menu strategy and development, told me at the Atlanta headquarters a few months after the company announced its no-antibiotics pledge. “But that’s not the reality. The goal is we’re going to get there within five years, 20 percent of our supply per year.”

To start, Farmer admitted, they would have to spend more money. Birds raised without routine antibiotics command a higher price, and it was a challenge to figure out whether any of that expense could be passed on to customers. Then the company would have to simplify complexities built into its sourcing, backstage decisions that would never be visible to a customer. For instance, Chick-fil-A had never embraced the industry trend of larger and larger chickens, since if a breast was too big, it would overwhelm the signature sandwich. But it also sells fried chicken tenders, and because tenders are actually breast muscles—the pectoralis minor, tucked up against the breastbone—ones that came from birds with the right size of breast for a sandwich were too small to make a good mouthful. A few years earlier, it had begun ordering only tenders from integrators whose farmers raised bigger birds. Now, confronting the relative scarcity of poultry raised without antibiotics, Chick-fil-A would have to embrace a beak-to-tail philosophy, with the goal of buying and using whole birds. Finding places to use the meat they had not previously bought might require debuting new dishes or changing the cooking procedures for items they already offered: adding antibiotic-free chicken to a soup in a restaurant, for example, instead of buying it from a contractor completely premade.

If, at the beginning of 2014, you had asked food movement leaders which company would lead the business away from antibiotics, it is a safe bet that no one would have nominated Chick-fil-A. It is axiomatic, if seldom spoken, that food activism arises in liberal coastal enclaves and seeps slowly into the red states. Chick-fil-A’s executives and its customers are churchgoing, big-box-shopping, college-football-watching conservatives, a constituency not necessarily attuned to animal welfare or antibiotic resistance. (It is likely that some of those churches preach suspicion of evolution, even though antibiotic resistance is evolution in real time.) But for just that reason, the company’s conversion was thrilling to see. It demonstrated that concern about farm antibiotic use—and the changes in farm operations that reducing antibiotics would cause—could cross cultural fractures and party lines.

When I asked Farmer whether Chick-fil-A’s move away from antibiotics meant it was endorsing the connection between farm use and resistance, he elided the question. “It was not our intent to enter into the scientific debate: Does this cause antibiotic resistance or not?” he told me. He framed the action instead as a task in line with the company’s Christian focus, honoring the responsibility that the biblical book of Genesis gave humanity: over “the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth.”

“It’s not about shareholder value,” Farmer told me. “It’s about faithful stewardship. We’re compelled to try to do the right thing for the right reasons.”

Big Chicken
“If you had asked food movement leaders which company would lead the business away from antibiotics, it is a safe bet that no one would have nominated Chick-fil-A.” —excerpted from Maryn McKenna’s Big Chicken

Photograph by Sam Kaplan/Trunk Archive

“I never planned on chickens,” Will Harris III said. We were sitting in a Jeep Wrangler, splashed halfway up the side panels with red mud. The Jeep was parked on the side of a deep green pasture, and in the pasture, there were several thousand broilers. The birds were rusty-feathered and glossy, with red combs and yellow legs. They were scratching and pecking in the wet grasses and lounging under rectangular awnings attached to cream-colored coops that looked like tiny garages. There were groupings of coops in the field, scattered as though they had popped up like mushrooms: six here, four there, another batch by the distant fence line. On the far side of the fence there were cattle, black with a glint of red where the sun caught their hides. Beyond the cattle was the heart of Harris’s farm, White Oak Pastures: offices and corrals and USDA-approved abattoirs. Beyond those, out of sight from where we were parked, were 3,000 acres holding rabbits and sheep and pigs and goats, turkeys and ducks and geese, guinea hens and laying hens, vegetables, fruits and bees, and more broilers, all on lush grass.

Harris is the fourth generation to operate White Oak, which lies tucked into the thinly populated western edge of Georgia, an hour south of the military traffic to Fort Benning and 40 minutes north of the Florida state line. His family has been on the property since his great-grandfather, James Edward Harris, fled the collapse of the Confederacy and founded a subsistence farm in 1866 outside the town of Bluffton. Over the decades, it grew into a substantial cattle ranch, helped along by every 20th-century development that fueled the growth of American agriculture: chemical fertilizers and pesticides to maintain a monoculture of grass, and hormone implants, artificial insemination, and antibiotics to maintain a monoculture of cattle. Harris inherited that operation and expanded it, following every precept he had learned studying animal science at the University of Georgia. He had worked on the farm for almost 20 years when he began to hear a whisper of conscience: Maybe he should go a different way.

Over the course of the next 20 years, Harris and his wife and daughters and their employees—there are about 135 of them now—remade their single-species conventional farm into the largest certified organic property in the southeastern United States: a multispecies, pasture-based, zero-waste laboratory for sustainability and innovation. Including chickens in that process was crucial to the farm’s success. It proved that poultry can be shaken free not only from antibiotic use, but also from fast-growth genetics and industrialized production.

White Oak Pastures, and a few other businesses that have emerged without notice beyond the edges of the conventional industry, embody what poultry production can look like as it moves away from antibiotics. The new models are humane, personal, and ambitious. But they are not perfect. To different degrees, they demonstrate the limits of businesses that are not part of Big Chicken, and they pose questions—not yet answered—about how the market will respond to them.

“I never owned a creature with feathers before January 2010—not so much as a parakeet,” Harris told me. “Then we bought a batch of 500, and now we have 60,000 on the ground at a time. But I can’t say if this will get bigger. I think it will be slow.”

Harris, who had passed 60, looks like a cattleman. He is sturdy and calm, wears a goatee and shaves his head, and is never seen in public without boots and a white Stetson, deeply creased from front to back. But he sounds like a forceful, slightly bawdy preacher—of sustainability, not religion. (“I was deep into the industrial model, but I am like a reformed prostitute now,” he told me once. “I have the zeal of the converted.” In his southwest Georgia accent, so different from the stereotypical southern drawl, the word hissed through his teeth: zeeeeel.) His change of heart was no lightning bolt on the road to Damascus. It arrived slowly over years, as he imagined his farm from his animals’ point of view.

“I had been taught that good animal welfare meant keeping them fed and watered and not intentionally inflicting pain or discomfort,” he said when I first met him in mid-2012. “That’s like saying good parenting would be taking your child and locking them in a closet. You give them plenty of food and leave the lights on and keep the heat at 72 degrees. They’re not going to get bit by animals or stung by wasps or get their leg broke playing ball. So that’s good parenting, right? But it’s not. And good animal welfare is not just keeping them from suffering. It’s creating an environment in which animals can express their instinctive behavior.”

The first step in Harris’s evolution away from his family’s farming tradition was opening his corrals and putting his Angus-based herd on grass, forgoing the grain he had been feeding them and letting them get their nutrition naturally. Next to go were the hormones and antibiotics. Then he withdrew the synthetic fertilizers that kept his pastures green year-round.

And then he ran into trouble. There were plants—he would have called them weeds a short time before, when he was spraying every day to maintain his Tifton 85 Bermuda, a sterile hybrid hay—that the cows did not care to eat. When the animals chomped down the tasty competition, the weeds threatened to overwhelm the fields. So Harris purchased a flock of sheep to eat the weeds. That was a bold step for a cow guy; in the 19th century, cattle owners had driven sheep herders out of western states with violence. But his new sheep, a meat breed that did not need shearing, gave him a second animal to harvest and fit well into the farm. Too well, maybe: Both the weeds and the grasses were being eaten down now, and the pastures were covered with sheep dung and cow pies.

Enter the chickens. If they lived in the pastures as chickens evolved to do, they would forage for seeds and insects, breaking up the dung piles for tasty worms and fly larvae and contributing their own high-nitrogen droppings to encourage fresh vegetation.

Harris found a hatchery in Alabama that dealt in heritage birds and slow-growing hybrids and asked them to send some chicks. He got 508. He picked a pasture, set up a mobile coop, plopped in the birds, and waited to see what would happen. By the time they reached a marketable weight—12 weeks, twice as long as an industrial chicken—506 had survived, and the area within the fence was transformed, lush and green with no visible cow pies. Harris slaughtered the first batch and ordered more. After trying several varieties—including a fast-growing industrial bird, which he describes mostly by swearing—he settled on an energetic bird called the Red Ranger, a cross of several heritage breeds.

By adding the sheep and then the chickens, Harris was embarking on rotational grazing, a historic practice, lost after industrialization, that uses each species on a farm to augment or remedy the effect of whichever animal came through the fields before. He also suddenly had many more animals: not only the hundreds of calves he formerly would have sent to feedlots but thousands of chickens as well.

On a day when he was loading some of the calves into a semi-trailer to send off for slaughter, he noticed, as if for the first time, that the ones on the lower level would have urine and dung cascading down on them throughout the ride. That did not accord with his emerging sense of animal welfare. To fix it, he spent millions, taking the extraordinary step of building his own USDA-inspected abattoirs in the center of the property, one for the cattle and a second one next to it for the birds. To make sure the slaughterhouses were humane, he hired animal welfare expert Temple Grandin to consult on their design. The abattoirs guaranteed that his animals would live their entire lives on the farm and would spend all of them on grass, except for their last few moments.

There are 10 species raised at White Oak now—five with four feet, five with two—and each earns its keep not just as a product but as a contributor to the farm’s economic cycle. The goats might be the only animal that can eat faster than kudzu can grow; Harris uses them to clear overgrown fields and orchards before he moves the pigs in. The pigs in turn root up crusted-over fields so they can be replanted in the mix of grass species that replaced the Bermuda grass. Bones are dried in the fields and ground for fertilizer. Cow hides are tanned for rugs and made into purses; fat becomes soap and candles; tracheas, chicken feet, and other gristly bits are dehydrated to sell as pet chews. The rinse water from the abattoirs is sprayed on the fields; viscera are dumped into tubs to make breeding grounds for high-protein fly larvae that are fed to the birds.

The chickens play an essential role. White Oak raises 260,000 broilers in a year and keeps a flock of 12,000 layer hens. They and the other birds—ducks, geese, turkeys, and guinea fowl, Harris’s favorite—arrive as day-old chicks, spend three to four weeks in a brooder barn behind the main offices, and then live in the fields. Each new batch of broilers is deposited in a cluster of coops, far enough from the other clusters that the birds will not wander and mix. They are locked in for one night, and then left free to roam, though they naturally return each night to their housing for safety. Ranch hands bring them water and supplemental feed, and every two weeks, the coops are dragged 40 feet by a tractor so the birds will refresh a different piece of land.

While the birds benefit the farm, they themselves benefit from Harris’s idea of better welfare. The slow-growth hybrids seem to have stronger immune systems; once out of the brooder, they do not randomly collapse and die as conventional birds do. And because they grow more slowly, they do not develop leg problems, and their hearts and circulation are not overstressed. Their main cause of death, before slaughter, is predation. Guardian dogs, Great Pyrenees and Akbash and Anatolian shepherds, protect the birds from coyotes and foxes—though in each flock, some are lost to owls and to bald eagles that roost in the farm’s woods. When the chickens are slaughtered, their rates of foodborne organisms come in below federal standards—and with no antibiotics used on the farm, there is no antibiotic resistance.

There is only one challenge remaining: how to make them profitable.

Big Chicken
Antibiotics don’t just fight infections; they also fatten chickens.

Photograph by Graeme Montgomery/Trunk Archive

White Oak slaughters 5,000 birds weekly. Once each week, a USDA inspector assigned to the plant reaches into the bins of water and ice where the just-killed birds are cooling, pulls one out at random, drops it into a plastic bag filled with a liquid that is optimal for growing bacteria, massages the bird through the bag, drains off the growth medium, and sends it to a lab to be cultured. A White Oak worker does the same thing at the same time. The tests look for Salmonella, Campylobacter, and E. coli. White Oak is allowed to have up to five positive weeks, out of any 52, in which pathogens are found. In a year, they usually have one.

Brian Sapp, the farm’s tall director of operations—he has a master’s degree in meat science and grew up on a flower bulb farm in Florida—suggested it might be because they keep the birds moving during the day as they roam and month to month as they transfer pastures. “We can’t control the environment the way you can in a closed house—the bedding, the air flow, and temperature control,” he said. “But in a closed house, those birds are sitting on their excrement and on dead chickens, whereas if there are any pathogens our [animals] build up, in three weeks we’ve moved them off.”

As in the Label Rouge program, fewer organisms come into the slaughterhouse with the chickens. But also, once in the White Oak processing plant, conditions make it less likely that bacteria will spread between birds. The number that White Oak kills and guts in a week, individually and by hand, equals what an industrial plant might handle in an hour, almost entirely by automation.

“We’re looking at every bird, handling every bird two or three times,” Sapp told me. “If there’s something contaminated, we can immediately stop what we’re doing, clean up, and start over. If you’ve got an evisceration line in a large plant, by the time somebody walks by and sees that a machine’s not working right, you may have 300 birds that have been contaminated, and you don’t know where that 300 starts and when it stops.”

The downside of all that handling is that labor is expensive. Harris estimates that White Oak’s labor costs per bird are three times as high as conventional birds, which passes through to the retail price. “My grass-fed beef costs 30 percent more than the grain-fed beef at Whole Foods, but my chicken is 300 percent more—and the reason is, chicken lent itself to industrialization so much more,” he said. “When we industrialized, we were able to take out labor costs, feed costs, land costs. When we put chicken back on pasture, we accept those costs back as well.”

Whole Foods on the Atlantic coast is one of Harris’s main retail channels, along with middlemen distributors, restaurants, and Internet sales. But Whole Foods shoppers are not what economists call “price sensitive”; they buy for ideology or identity or flavor as much as for cost. And White Oak’s chickens are delicious, with lean meat and deep flavor similar to Label Rouge birds. But like those birds, they can be challenging to cook and to eat. An early collaboration with a chef who wanted to shape a fast-casual chain around them broke down when customers complained the flesh was chewy and fretted that the interior of the legs remained pink. (The color indicated the chicken got plenty of blood-pumping exercise when it was alive, but eaters worried it was raw.)

Working with chefs is a crucial part of the chicken project—not just for the birds they buy, but for the awareness they spread to their customers as well. Their needs are something that White Oak has had to learn. “We try to find chefs who are willing to celebrate inconsistency, because with pastured poultry, that is unavoidable,” Harris’s daughter Jenni told me. She is the middle child of his three daughters and the farm’s director of marketing; everyone accepts that she will run the farm after him. “But I get it. They order a case of chicken from us, 12 birds, and in that box there are birds that are 3.1 pounds and 3.9 pounds. An industrial producer could control that better. Our birds are out burning calories, escaping from predators, hiding from the sun, taking dust baths, eating bugs and grubs of different types in different portions—which from an animal welfare perspective is excellent but from a perspective of predictability is hard.”

The result is that, after seven years, White Oak’s chickens are still not paying for themselves. Harris says it is hard to know how much money the birds are losing him because he does not break out his balance sheets by species. But he suspects that the farm’s grass-fed beef, its signature product, pays for all the rest. He is okay with that. “I bet you we got two-point-something million dollars, maybe three million, invested in being in the chicken business, and I don’t regret it,” he said. “I believe the time will come that it will be profitable.”


See McKenna at the Decatur Book Festival, where she’ll speak at 12:30 p.m. on Saturday, September 2. She’ll also attend the Georgia launch party for the book at Manuel’s Tavern at 7 p.m. on Monday, September 18. For more of her local appearances, go to marynmckenna.com.


Excerpted from Big Chicken, published by National Geographic Partners, LLC, September 12, 2017. Copyright © 2017 by Maryn McKenna

This article originally appeared in our September 2017 issue.

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Rwanda's eco-retreat Bisate Lodge is built into a volcanic cone – The Spaces

New eco-resort Bisate Lodge gives a fresh spin to indigenous architecture in Rwanda.

Johannesburg practice Nicholas Plewman Architects designed the six hillside villas beside Volcanoes National Park, taking inspiration from the King’s Palace at Nyanza. The thatched-roof spheres have been built inside an eroded volcanic cone and have a basket-like appearance, with ribbed walls and floor-to-ceiling glazing that peeks out towards Mount Bisoke.

Bisate Lodge in Rwanda, operated by Wilderness Safaris

Via Wilderness Safaris

‘Culture, in the form of traditional architecture, craft and beliefs, has been incorporated into the lodge design and interiors,’ says Keith Vincent, CEO of Wilderness Safaris group which operates the 103-acre resort.

Each holiday villa has its own living room and en-suite bedroom, and is set around a central volcanic stone fireplace.

Bisate Lodge in Rwanda, operated by Wilderness Safaris

Via Wilderness Safaris

Designer Caline Williams-Wynn of Cape Town practice Artichoke created the lodge interiors with input from fashion designer Teta Isibo. Rooms are decked in Rwandan textiles and furnishings decorated with imigongo. The local art form uses hardened cow dung to create geometric patterns, decorated with coloured soils.

Elsewhere, emerald green chandeliers made from recycled glass hang in the living rooms and cowhide rugs dot the floors.

Bisate Lodge costs from $1,400 per person, per night, and is currently in the running for a 2017 African Architecture Award.

Bisate Lodge in Rwanda, operated by Wilderness Safaris

Via Wilderness Safaris

Visitors to the eco-tourist resort can go gorilla trekking in the national park, and engage in Wilderness Safaris’ extensive reforestation programme in the area.

[Via Inhabitat]

Read next: Rent a South African dune house

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August Real Estate Extra home of the month: Larry and Zelda Elwood, Mason City – Mason City Globe Gazette

The twin home of Larry and Zelda Elwood at 2356 Ping Court, Mason City, has an open floor plan viewed from the entry and boasts contemporary materials in floors, walls and counters. Steel siding for the ranch home is slate gray with white trim.

Facing east, the white front door has a glass panel with a waterfall effect. Inside, shades of neutral gray walls are complemented by white flat panel doors and trim throughout the home. Recessed lighting is also used throughout. Flooring in the entry, kitchen, great room and dining area is ¾-inch hardwood hickory. In the entry, stone tile in gray rectangles is used in the middle.

South in the entry is a coat closet and next is the two-panel flat door to the attached two-stall garage. On the north is an 11-by-6 office or bedroom with a flat panel door and a bathroom is next. The 15-by-27 great room is ahead of the entry.

The office or bedroom has two casement windows with a view on the east. Double closets with white bi-fold doors are on the west. Walls are light gray.

Next to the bathroom on the north has stone tile flooring in gray squares and light gray walls. On the north side, the back splash for the tub/shower is horizontal stone tile in gray tones, with narrow vertical stone tile inserts in the middle. Two rows of glass block windows are above the back splash.

The sink on the west has a brownish/gray quartz counter, with a mounted mirror above. The mirror has an etched border that complements the front door. Three small glass cylinder lights above the mirror have a bubble effect.

Looking west to the great room, there is a tray ceiling at the west end and in the center of the west wall is a sliding glass door flanked by two fixed panels. All three are covered by vertical white Venetian blinds. The glass door opens to a wood deck set up for dining and entertainment. On the north of the great room, two casement windows flank a fixed panel.

South of the great room, the 10-by-16 kitchen has stainless steel appliances, with the refrigerator, range top and double ovens on the south. The double-door refrigerator has a refrigerator drawer below and a freezer on the bottom. A pantry with sliding shelves is at the east end of the refrigerator. Doors for the pantry and cupboards above are soft close.

Touch controls at the top for the double ovens can change pictures when turned on and can hook up to Wi-Fi. There is a storage drawer below the ovens.

The right front burner of the electric magnetic flat black range top can go to boiling in 90 seconds, and then can go back down to being cool to the touch. A stainless steel vent is above the range. Cupboards are above the refrigerator, ovens and quartz counter. There are three wide drawers underneath the range. All drawers and cupboards are white. A lazy susan below the counter is in the southwest corner. Handles for the drawers and cupboards are chrome.

For a whimsical touch, there’s a portrait of a cow on the west and a portrait of a goat on the south. The cow is straight forward, but the goat looks a little tipsy. Also in the kitchen and beside the west door in the great room are dark green abstract runs made of leather strips. One rug was first found at Target but years later the second was found online.

On the west, the double stainless steel sink has two casement windows above and a chrome chef’s faucet. Cupboards and a stainless steel microwave are above the counter on the west. The quartz counter in neutral shades is around the range on the south and west and then around the sink and underneath cupboards. Drawers and a trash bin are below the counter.

Above the eat-in island in the middle are three oval chandeliers with three glass bubbles circled in black. The eat-in side is on the north. On the south of the island are eight extra-deep drawers and cupboard with chrome handles.

The combined 10-by-13 dining/kitchen area is to the southeast. The round table can be easily converted to a rectangular table. Underneath is a black and white cow hide. A glistening rectangular chandelier has glass bubbles in squares.

On the southwest side of the house, the 14-by-16 master bedroom has three windows on the west, with a crank-out in the middle flanked by casement windows. The master bath is on the east and has flooring of rectangular stone tile in a gray pattern. The vanity has a quartz counter in brownish-gray. Two sinks with chrome faucets are on the north, topped by contemporary curved-panel lights. Three drawers and two cupboards are underneath the counter. Walls are light gray.

A stacked Whirlpool stainless-steel laundry is on the south side of the master bath. The shower is in the northeast corner, with gray stone tile in rectangles gong to the ceiling and small stone tile as flooring.

On the east is a carpeted walk-in closet. The color is called gregiage as it can look gray or brownish beige.

Carpeted stairs at the east end of the dining area go to the lower level, heading south. The carpet is in the gregiage coloring. The railing is white and balusters are stainless. The railing to the lower level is white and walls are gray. On the west side, the family room is also carpeted in the gregiage coloring. Three windows — garden windows — are on the west. Two are casement. All doors are flat panel and lighting in the family room is recessed.

Two egress windows are on the north side of the lower level. On the northwest, the room has a double closet on the south and white bi-fold doors with chrome knobs. A dome light is in the center of the ceiling. The egress window is on the north. On the east, with the egress window on the east, a double closet with white bi-fold doors has chrome handles. This room also has a dome light in the center of the ceiling. The flat panel door is white.

Stone tile in gray-patterned rectangles floors the bathroom on the north. The shower with a glass door is on the north. A hammered design is at the edge of the mirror and the west vanity and sink have a quartz counter in brownish-gray. Two drawers and one cupboard are below. Above the mirror are three bulbs in chrome shades.

At the east end of the family room a storage/utility room hold the forced air gas furnace, the central air conditioning, a hot water heater and a sump pump. The house does not need flood insurance.

Built in 2016 on an irregular lot, the home has frame construction. Finished square feet in the main level is 1,410. Total square feet finished and unfinished is 2,820.

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PETA awards IKEA, Habitat and Heal's for vegan design – Dezeen

IKEA, Habitat and Heal’s are among the brands named in PETA’s first Vegan Homeware Awards, which recognise the best cruelty-free designs for the home.

The awards, announced today, are split across 14 categories, ranging from best vegan sofa and office chair to an innovation prize for new materials.

IKEA was recognised in the Vegan Homeware Awards for best faux-sheepskin rug

It is the first year that PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) has run the awards, which the organisation attributes to a “soaring interest in vegan living”.

In the UK, the number of vegans has risen 360 per cent in 10 years, with at least 542,000 people in Britain now thought to be following a diet free of animal products.

Rockett St George took away the award for best vegan sofa

The winners of the Vegan Homeware Awards are a mix of large-scale brands, small studios and individual designers whom PETA has described as “forward-thinking” in their attitudes towards vegan products.

“Home is where the heart is – and compassionate consumers are driving the demand for beautiful vegan homeware,” said PETA director Elisa Allen.

“Forward-thinking designers are experimenting with sustainable and cutting-edge vegan materials and offering a great variety of cruelty-free choices to suit every home and budget.”

Le Labo topped the home fragrance category

Swedish furniture giant IKEA, which ranked at number six on Dezeen Hot List, was awarded for best faux-sheepskin rug.

Design website Made.com took the accolade for best vegan leather home office chair, while Heal’s was recognised for best faux-fur throw.

The innovation award went to Slovakian designer Šimon Kern was awarded for his Beleaf chair, which is made from a mixture of recycled leaves and bio-resin.

Šimon Kern received the innovation award for his Beleaf chair, which is made from a mixture of recycled leaves and bio-resin

Other awards include Rockett St George for best vegan sofa, Debenhams for down-free bedding, Habitat for silk-free sheets, Le Labo for home fragrance, and Zara for wool-free curtains and blankets.

Vegan interior designer Emily Turnbull took home the influencer award, Pacifica’s soy candles won best home candle, and Monsoon received the prize for the best feather-free cushion.

Monsoon received the prize for the best feather-free cushion

Designers are developing an increasing number of alternatives to animal-based materials, including Piñatex, an alternative to leather made from pineapple leaves.

Others have experimented with everything from mushrooms to red algae powder in the search for more sustainable materials.

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Fisherman Catches Rare Blue Lobster, Donates It to Science – Mental Floss

Born in San Francisco in 1932, Dian Fossey came from a world far removed from the dense jungles of East Africa. She discovered that environment in her thirties and spent the final decades of her life studying the gorillas that lived there. From her groundbreaking primatology work to her mysterious death, here are 11 facts about the scientist behind Gorillas in the Mist.

1. HER LOVE OF ANIMALS BEGAN WITH A PET GOLDFISH.

Though she went on to become one of history’s most famous animal-lovers, Fossey didn’t grow up in a pet-friendly household. The only animal she was allowed to keep as a child was a single goldfish. She loved her fish, but when it died, her parents barred her from getting another animal to replace it. Even a pet hamster offered to her by a classmate was forbidden from entering the house.

2. SHE WAS A PRIZE-WINNING EQUESTRIAN.

Not permitted to keep pets in the home, Fossey nurtured her passion for animals through equestrianism. She received her first horseback-riding lesson at age 6. By the time she reached her teen years, she was advanced enough to merit an invitation to join the riding team at Lowell High School in San Francisco. Her hobby earned her several awards and pushed her to pursue an education in animal husbandry at the University of California, Davis. Even after she’d shifted career aspirations to occupational therapy, Fossey chose to move to Kentucky to be closer to farm life.

3. SHE SPENT HER LIFE SAVINGS ON HER FIRST TRIP TO AFRICA.

Dian Fossey was 31 when she first stepped foot on the continent where she’d complete her most important work. Inspired by a friend’s trip to Africa, she collected her life savings (about $8000), took out a three-year bank loan, and planned a seven-week trip through the wilderness of Kenya, Tanzania, Congo, and Zimbabwe. On her adventures there she met Louis Leakey, the anthropologist famous for sponsoring the all-woman trio of primatology pioneers (the “trimates”) that included Jane Goodall, Biruté Galdikas, and eventually Dian Fossey herself. It was also during this period when Fossey saw gorillas in the wild for the first time. She met wildlife photographers Joan and Alan Root and joined them on an expedition to photograph the animals in the Congolese mountains. The vacation wasn’t scientific in nature, but as Fossey later wrote, “The seed was planted in my head, even if unconsciously, that I would someday return to Africa to study the gorillas of the mountains.”

4. SHE PROVED HER DEDICATION WITH AN APPENDECTOMY.

Leakey reconnected with Fossey back in the States in 1966. The anthropologist had spent the last several years supporting his former secretary Jane Goodall in her chimpanzee research, and now he was in search of a candidate to do for gorillas what Goodall had done for chimps. After getting to know Fossey better, he decided she was the right woman for the job. He offered to gather the funding for her trip back to Africa, but before she left she would need to remove her appendix as a precaution. This didn’t scare her off. When Leakey wrote six weeks later to say the surgery wouldn’t be necessary and he had just wanted to make sure she was committed, she was already appendix-less.

5. HER FIRST RESEARCH EXPEDITION ENDED ABRUPTLY.

Fossey returned to the Congo toward the end of 1966—just months before a civil war erupted in the already volatile region. Rebel soldiers captured her at her base camp in July 1967. After spending two weeks in military detainment, she was able to bribe her way out with promises of cash and her Land Rover. The guards agreed to drive her to Uganda, and shortly after they arrived, she had them arrested. After the scare, Fossey was ready to resume her research almost immediately: This time she set up camp in Rwanda, ignoring warnings from the U.S. Embassy.

6. SHE UNCOVERED THE GORILLAS’ TRUE NATURE.

Prior to Fossey’s research, the public viewed gorillas as beasts similar in temperament to King Kong. She quickly disproved the notion that gorillas were bloodthirsty animals that would attack humans when given the chance.

To infiltrate their society, she adopted their habits. Walking on her knuckles and chewing on celery stalks allowed her to gain the apes’ trust. As long as she maintained a nonthreatening profile and made her presence known at all times, she was safe around the gentle behemoths. Today we know that despite their intimidating size, gorillas are some of the least violent members of the great ape family.

7. SHE EARNED A UNIQUE NICKNAME FROM LOCALS.

Dian Fossey spent enough time at her research center in Rwanda to garner a reputation. To the locals she was Nyiramachabelli, a Swahili name that when roughly translated means “the woman who lives alone on the mountain.”

8. SHE USED THE GORILLAS’ NOSES TO TELL THEM APART.

Many of the gorillas Fossey studied were given names, such as Peanut, Rafiki, and Uncle Bert. Fossey used another method to tell her subjects apart: She drew sketches of their noses. Each gorilla has a unique pattern of wrinkles around its nose that makes it easy to identify. These nose prints are the equivalent of fingerprints in humans, but instead of getting up close to study them, Fossey was able to document them from far away using binoculars and a sketchpad.

9. ONE OF HER GORILLAS IS ALIVE TODAY.

Hundreds of gorillas made it into Dian Fossey’s body of research. In 2017, only one specimen from that original pool is still alive. Poppy was born into a group of gorillas on Fossey’s radar in 1976. The researcher documented the animal’s birth and childhood in her journals. Today, at 41, Poppy is the oldest gorilla currently monitored by the Dian Fossey Fund.

10. HER WORK IS THE SUBJECT OF A BOOK, A MOVIE, AND AN OPERA.

In 1983, Fossey published the book that helped make her famous. Gorillas in the Mist is the autobiographical account of her first 13 years in the African jungle and the scientific discoveries she made about the gorillas living there. The title went on to become a bestseller. Five years later, Sigourney Weaver starred as Fossey in a film of the same name. The biopic snagged five Oscar nominations and converted Weaver into a gorilla conservationist.

There’s another dramatization of Fossey’s life that’s not so widely known: In 2006, the Kentucky Opera VISIONS! program staged an opera called Nyiramachabelli—a nod to the researcher’s nickname.

11. HER DEATH REMAINS A MYSTERY.

Next to her groundbreaking gorilla research, Fossey is perhaps best known for her mysterious and tragic murder. On December 27, 1985, she was found dead in her cabin at her Rwandan research camp. The cause of death was a machete blow to the head, but the identity of her assailant remains unknown to this day. (A Rwandan court convicted in absentia her American research assistant, Wayne McGuire, for her murder and sentenced him to death. McGuire, who fled Rwanda before the conviction, has always maintained his innocence.) Fossey was buried in the nearby mountains beside the grave of her favorite gorilla Digit, who had been slaughtered by poachers years earlier. Before she was killed, Fossey wrote one final entry in her diary. It reads:

“When you realize the value of all life, you dwell less on what is past and concentrate on the preservation of the future.”

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The Tardigrade's Extraordinary Weirdness Continues – Mental Floss

Born in San Francisco in 1932, Dian Fossey came from a world far removed from the dense jungles of East Africa. She discovered that environment in her thirties and spent the final decades of her life studying the gorillas that lived there. From her groundbreaking primatology work to her mysterious death, here are 11 facts about the scientist behind Gorillas in the Mist.

1. HER LOVE OF ANIMALS BEGAN WITH A PET GOLDFISH.

Though she went on to become one of history’s most famous animal-lovers, Fossey didn’t grow up in a pet-friendly household. The only animal she was allowed to keep as a child was a single goldfish. She loved her fish, but when it died, her parents barred her from getting another animal to replace it. Even a pet hamster offered to her by a classmate was forbidden from entering the house.

2. SHE WAS A PRIZE-WINNING EQUESTRIAN.

Not permitted to keep pets in the home, Fossey nurtured her passion for animals through equestrianism. She received her first horseback-riding lesson at age 6. By the time she reached her teen years, she was advanced enough to merit an invitation to join the riding team at Lowell High School in San Francisco. Her hobby earned her several awards and pushed her to pursue an education in animal husbandry at the University of California, Davis. Even after she’d shifted career aspirations to occupational therapy, Fossey chose to move to Kentucky to be closer to farm life.

3. SHE SPENT HER LIFE SAVINGS ON HER FIRST TRIP TO AFRICA.

Dian Fossey was 31 when she first stepped foot on the continent where she’d complete her most important work. Inspired by a friend’s trip to Africa, she collected her life savings (about $8000), took out a three-year bank loan, and planned a seven-week trip through the wilderness of Kenya, Tanzania, Congo, and Zimbabwe. On her adventures there she met Louis Leakey, the anthropologist famous for sponsoring the all-woman trio of primatology pioneers (the “trimates”) that included Jane Goodall, Biruté Galdikas, and eventually Dian Fossey herself. It was also during this period when Fossey saw gorillas in the wild for the first time. She met wildlife photographers Joan and Alan Root and joined them on an expedition to photograph the animals in the Congolese mountains. The vacation wasn’t scientific in nature, but as Fossey later wrote, “The seed was planted in my head, even if unconsciously, that I would someday return to Africa to study the gorillas of the mountains.”

4. SHE PROVED HER DEDICATION WITH AN APPENDECTOMY.

Leakey reconnected with Fossey back in the States in 1966. The anthropologist had spent the last several years supporting his former secretary Jane Goodall in her chimpanzee research, and now he was in search of a candidate to do for gorillas what Goodall had done for chimps. After getting to know Fossey better, he decided she was the right woman for the job. He offered to gather the funding for her trip back to Africa, but before she left she would need to remove her appendix as a precaution. This didn’t scare her off. When Leakey wrote six weeks later to say the surgery wouldn’t be necessary and he had just wanted to make sure she was committed, she was already appendix-less.

5. HER FIRST RESEARCH EXPEDITION ENDED ABRUPTLY.

Fossey returned to the Congo toward the end of 1966—just months before a civil war erupted in the already volatile region. Rebel soldiers captured her at her base camp in July 1967. After spending two weeks in military detainment, she was able to bribe her way out with promises of cash and her Land Rover. The guards agreed to drive her to Uganda, and shortly after they arrived, she had them arrested. After the scare, Fossey was ready to resume her research almost immediately: This time she set up camp in Rwanda, ignoring warnings from the U.S. Embassy.

6. SHE UNCOVERED THE GORILLAS’ TRUE NATURE.

Prior to Fossey’s research, the public viewed gorillas as beasts similar in temperament to King Kong. She quickly disproved the notion that gorillas were bloodthirsty animals that would attack humans when given the chance.

To infiltrate their society, she adopted their habits. Walking on her knuckles and chewing on celery stalks allowed her to gain the apes’ trust. As long as she maintained a nonthreatening profile and made her presence known at all times, she was safe around the gentle behemoths. Today we know that despite their intimidating size, gorillas are some of the least violent members of the great ape family.

7. SHE EARNED A UNIQUE NICKNAME FROM LOCALS.

Dian Fossey spent enough time at her research center in Rwanda to garner a reputation. To the locals she was Nyiramachabelli, a Swahili name that when roughly translated means “the woman who lives alone on the mountain.”

8. SHE USED THE GORILLAS’ NOSES TO TELL THEM APART.

Many of the gorillas Fossey studied were given names, such as Peanut, Rafiki, and Uncle Bert. Fossey used another method to tell her subjects apart: She drew sketches of their noses. Each gorilla has a unique pattern of wrinkles around its nose that makes it easy to identify. These nose prints are the equivalent of fingerprints in humans, but instead of getting up close to study them, Fossey was able to document them from far away using binoculars and a sketchpad.

9. ONE OF HER GORILLAS IS ALIVE TODAY.

Hundreds of gorillas made it into Dian Fossey’s body of research. In 2017, only one specimen from that original pool is still alive. Poppy was born into a group of gorillas on Fossey’s radar in 1976. The researcher documented the animal’s birth and childhood in her journals. Today, at 41, Poppy is the oldest gorilla currently monitored by the Dian Fossey Fund.

10. HER WORK IS THE SUBJECT OF A BOOK, A MOVIE, AND AN OPERA.

In 1983, Fossey published the book that helped make her famous. Gorillas in the Mist is the autobiographical account of her first 13 years in the African jungle and the scientific discoveries she made about the gorillas living there. The title went on to become a bestseller. Five years later, Sigourney Weaver starred as Fossey in a film of the same name. The biopic snagged five Oscar nominations and converted Weaver into a gorilla conservationist.

There’s another dramatization of Fossey’s life that’s not so widely known: In 2006, the Kentucky Opera VISIONS! program staged an opera called Nyiramachabelli—a nod to the researcher’s nickname.

11. HER DEATH REMAINS A MYSTERY.

Next to her groundbreaking gorilla research, Fossey is perhaps best known for her mysterious and tragic murder. On December 27, 1985, she was found dead in her cabin at her Rwandan research camp. The cause of death was a machete blow to the head, but the identity of her assailant remains unknown to this day. (A Rwandan court convicted in absentia her American research assistant, Wayne McGuire, for her murder and sentenced him to death. McGuire, who fled Rwanda before the conviction, has always maintained his innocence.) Fossey was buried in the nearby mountains beside the grave of her favorite gorilla Digit, who had been slaughtered by poachers years earlier. Before she was killed, Fossey wrote one final entry in her diary. It reads:

“When you realize the value of all life, you dwell less on what is past and concentrate on the preservation of the future.”

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Victoria's Best Places to Stay – Broadsheet

Built in 2006, this part-futuristic, part early-1970s, part modern-day beach shack in Cape Schanck was built in league with sunlight’s movement across the site, wind frequency, speed and direction. The resulting award-winning design by Paul Morgan Architects is both environmentally conscious and aesthetically intriguing, with walls and windows taking on uncommon angles, and the striking sci-fi-esque internal water tank (aka living room “blob”) acting as a natural cooling system in warmer months.

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Interior inspiration of the week – Stuff.co.nz

Your Friday dose of puppy love, it's photographer Tara Sutherland's French bulldog Puppy, Bogie, atop a stylish rug.

INSTAGRAM.COM/TARASUTHERLAND

Your Friday dose of puppy love, it’s photographer Tara Sutherland’s French bulldog Puppy, Bogie, atop a stylish rug.

Natural shades and textures are front and centre this week in Instagram’s best put together posts.

New shapes from the European continent combine with antique roses and mixed media art that’s all homegrown.

Unusual colour pairings shine, such as teal and yellow, or navy and blush, set off by the occasional pop of crimson.

Be it a berry shade of burgundy or fire engine red, it’s a reminder that a little red goes a long way.

READ MORE:
* Earthy Terracotta cool
* Why the Kmart cult-love?
* Brass beauty

Let’s take a look.

SUMMER DREAMERS


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Bursting with design initiative, beach-side bloggers Lover Dreamer at Home are already summer-proofing their pad.

Access to drinks and snacks is key, yes.

Also note the abundance of organic textures paired with new trend colour combination – marigold and washed jade – coming through? Brilliant.

COLOUR WITH CARMEL

The awesomeness factor of Carmel Van Der Hoeven’s artwork above is equal to its size.

Now this is a focal point for a living space.

LADY OF SHALOTT

Sunshine please 🙏

A post shared by Milly Van Der Hoeven (@primmgardens) on Jul 19, 2017 at 3:27pm PDT

Meanwhile, at sister Milly Van Der Hoeven’s garden in Pirongia, aka, Primm Gardens, there are David Austen roses in bloom.

If you’ve ever smelled a David Austen rose, you will remember. The antique variety has a heavenly scent unlike any other. 

Extra points for such a striking burnt orange shade, aptly named for John William Waterhouse’s red-haired beauty, The Lady of Shalott.

EUROPEAN INFLUENCE

It’s all style this week at Kartell Auckland as they await the arrival of these pink and blue delights.

It’s hard to decide which object is more appealing.

FLAT LAY FEAST

Meanwhile Kim Lane of The Coastal Creative rises to the Creatively Squared flat lay challenge.

Loving the raw elements and retro Fijian vibes.

THE FLORAL SPELL

Here’s a botanical pick-me-up fresh from the studio of Nelson artist Wendy Matenga.

Also, do any of those bits and pieces look familiar? It’s art-ception.

DECOR INSPIRATION

Wellington design curator Tehani of Little Darling Styling has her eyes set on the right prize.

This cow-hide armchair is a great monochromatic balance to blush and caramel.

HOT HOTTIES

Hear us out on this one, these New Zealand made hotties have to be witnessed in person.

Crafted from felt, the flowers have a three-dimensional appeal. 

If only there really were bright red hydrangeas. Thanks for sharing Next Door Gallery.

BLUE ORCHID

Speaking of surreal blooms, have you ever seen an aqua blue orchid?

What a truly magical, unearthly shade.

Thanks for sharing Tropical Treasures Taranaki.

PUPPY LOVE

Last and maybe least but only because he is just so tiny, everyone meet photographer Tara Sutherland’s fur baby – Bogie the french bulldog puppy.

Already a star, Bodie even has his own Instagram account, and is the perfect accessory to any home.

Furthermore, he lives in stylish surroundings. Loving the teal green cabinet and monochrome rug.


 – Homed

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