How to choose the perfect rug – Stuff.co.nz

Ask yourself how the room is used, advises Lillian Barker. If it gets a lot of foot traffic then your rug will need to ...

JANE USSHER

Ask yourself how the room is used, advises Lillian Barker. If it gets a lot of foot traffic then your rug will need to be hard wearing.

When it comes to finishing off a room, a rug is a key ingredient. 

Annie Loveridge, director of The Ivy House, puts it simply: “Rooms look better with a rug.” 

With the ability to transform a space, introduce a sense of luxury, personality, softness or edge, rugs are an element you want to get right. 

If there is a cold, hard floor, a rug can help soften the room.

JANE USSHER

If there is a cold, hard floor, a rug can help soften the room.

PURPOSE

The first thing to think about is what you want the rug to do for your space, suggests Loveridge. 

“Do you want it to provide a soft flooring area or is it more cosmetic? Do you want it to unify a space or define an area?” she asks. A rug can pull together a mixed selection of furniture or it can be a bold statement in a neutral furnishing scheme. 

.stuffhome-pointer
width:100%;
min-height:38px;
clear:both;
margin-bottom:20px;
margin-top:10px;

.stuffhome-pointer-inner
float:left;
width:100%;
min-height:38px;
/* background-color: #fff; */
background-repeat: repeat-x;

.stuffhome-pointer a
text-transform: lowercase;
padding-top:10px;
padding-right:100px;
padding-bottom: 10px;
padding-left:0px;
width:100%;
min-height:38px;
color: #41AD95;
display:block;
font-family: ‘Merriweather Sans’, serif;
text-decoration: none;
font-weight: 300;
overflow: hidden;
background-image: url(http://file.stuff.co.nz/stuff/tom/pointers/homed/stuffhomedlogo.png);
background-position: right top;
background-repeat: no-repeat;
background-size: auto 26px;
box-sizing: border-box;
font-size:14px;
border-bottom: solid 2px #41AD95;

.stuffhome-pointer a:hover
/* text-decoration: underline; */
opacity: 0.6;

.stuffhome-pointer a span
font-weight: 700;

@media only screen and (max-width: 360px)
.stuffhome-pointer a
background-position: right 10px;

READ MORE:
* What’s your flooring preference? Wool or nylon carpet, solid timber or laminate?
* Choosing the right carpet
* Design Space: Alex Fulton’s ‘thing with floors’ 

SIZE

The rug you choose to go under your dining table should be larger than the table so there is enough space for the chairs ...

JANE USSHER

The rug you choose to go under your dining table should be larger than the table so there is enough space for the chairs to stay on it when pulled back.

“Get out the measuring tape,” is Loveridge’s first suggestion. “Measure your space. Getting the size right is key.” 


Ad Feedback

A rug that is too small draws the eye in, makes the space feel smaller and furniture feel disconnected. Too big and the space will feel cluttered and stuffy. 

A simple way to get an idea of size is to take four A4 pieces of paper and place one in each corner of where you want the rug to go. Your eyes will travel to those four corners and will help to give you a good sense of the size. 

In a bedroom, place a large rug underneath the bed with a generous amount visible at the foot and sides. Keep bedside ...

JANE USSHER

In a bedroom, place a large rug underneath the bed with a generous amount visible at the foot and sides. Keep bedside tables off the rug to highlight the floor and enhance the feeling of space, says Annie Loveridge.

“A common solution is to have a rug that sits within the furniture,” says Loveridge. Ideally all furniture is touching the rug, for example the legs of a couch should be on the rug. “But don’t place furniture on the shorter ends of the rug as it will draw the space back in,” she warns.

SHAPE

Choosing the right shaped rug all comes down to the purpose of the rug and the room it’s in. 

Take a dining room –  a rule of thumb in design is that repetition creates harmony, says Lillian Baker of Furtex. If you have a rectangular dining table, it’s normally a good idea to choose a rectangular rug. 

.product-carousel display: block; width: 620px; border: none; overflow: hidden; height: 320px; margin: 20px auto; .product-carousel__1 height: 320px; .product-carousel__2 height: 320px; .product-carousel__4 height: 565px;
@media(max-width: 620px) .product-carousel width: 100%; .product-carousel__1 height: 320px; .product-carousel__2 height: 545px; .product-carousel__4 height: 1050px;

“Make sure there is room extending beyond all sides of the table. When the chairs are pushed back they should still stay on the rug,” she says. 

The minimum that allows for this is 75cm on each side, says Loveridge, so the ideal rug size is generally at least 1.5m larger than the table in each direction. 

In a bedroom, any shape goes. “A large rectangular rug can frame a bed really well, but a circular rug will add a little bit of fun and something like a cow hide will add some interest.” 

Don't be afraid to go with rich colours, especially if the rest of the room is neutral.

THE IVY HOUSE

Don’t be afraid to go with rich colours, especially if the rest of the room is neutral.

COLOUR AND TEXTURE

In a living room, it’s important to consider the sofa and wall colour and the atmosphere you want to create. 

If it’s calm and relaxing you’re after, Baker suggests going for a wool or jute rug in a natural colour palette. 

Layering rugs is hard to achieve but looks amazing when done right, says Annie Loveridge. The best way to achieve this ...

JANE USSHER

Layering rugs is hard to achieve but looks amazing when done right, says Annie Loveridge. The best way to achieve this is to go with contrast, in either shape, texture, colour and size.

Creating a playful, energising space? “[Look for] primary colours, bold patterns or … luxuriously dark and moody jewel tones,” she says. 

LAYERING

Baker says layering rugs adds texture and personality. “You can never have too much of either in your home.” It’s also a great way to fill a space. 

“Try contrasting textures and styles – a jewel-toned antique patchwork floor rug over a larger textured jute rug for example.” 


 – Homed

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link