Changing the thinking on fat inclusion in dairy cow diets – Agriland

Changing the thinking on fat inclusion in dairy cow diets

A notable transformation is taking place in the way fats – more specifically fatty acids – are included and utilised in the diets of dairy cows.

Adam Lock, an associate professor specialising in fat and fatty acid nutrition in the Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University, USA, outlined the “sea change” at the recent Transitioning from Fats to Fatty Acids seminar at the Volac Wilmar conference in Co. Cork recently.

“Typically a bag of fat was thought as a bag of fat and it was to just bring in calories – extra energy – to the cow.

“But what we are starting to understand is the effects of individual fatty acids can be quite different in the dairy cow on the yield of milk and milk components; energy partitioning; body condition and reproduction; and health.

The fatty acid profile in a fat supplement is going to be the first factor in determining the response to it.

“The next time that someone is looking to sell you a new fat supplement, the number one question is what type of fatty acids are in it because that’s going to determine what type of response you will expect to see from it,” he told delegates at the Volac Wilmar organised conference.

Lock’s research programmes focus on both dairy production and human nutrition and health. The central theme is fatty acid digestion and metabolism in the dairy cow and the impact of bioactive acids on animal production.

Over recent years, he has lead research looking at the impact of including numerous fatty acids in the diet of dairy cows – most notably palmitic acid (C16:O), stearic acid (C18:O) and oleic acid (C18:1).

“All three of these are important for dairy cow metabolism and what we are trying to understand is if there is an ideal ratio among these fatty acids that may help us optimise their utilisation in dairy cow rations and what interactions they may have with other animal and dietary factors,” he said.

The research

A paper published earlier this year highlighted the impacts of feeding palmitic acid, a palmitic acid / stearic acid blend and a palmitic acid / oleic acid blend at 1.5% of diet dry matter to mid-lactation, high-producing cows. All three of these treatments were compared to a “control” or a diet not supplemented with additional fat.

“We saw an improvement in NDF (neutral detergent fibre) digestibility with palmitic acid, but we also saw a slight improvement with our palmitic acid / oleic acid treatment.

“But when we take out half of the palmitic acid and add in stearic acid, we actually see a decline in NDF digestibility.”

In terms of the digestibility of fatty acids, Lock noted that there was no difference between the control and the palmitic acid treatment. However, when half of the palmitic acid was replaced with stearic acid, a significant reduction in fatty acid digestibility was observed.

On the other hand, when oleic acid was added into the diet (the palmitic acid / oleic acid treatment) an improvement in fatty acid digestibility was observed.

Referring to the results observed when oleic acid was added to the diet, Lock said: “This was a little bit surprising. We were feeding 1.5% more fatty acid in the diet compared to the control, but we actually improved the fatty acid digestibility.”

Commenting further, he said: “All three of the treatments gave a nice increase in milk yield over the control – about 2.5kg.

“But then when you look at the effects on milk fat percent, you can see that it’s only the high palmitic acid treatment that’s improving milk fat percent; the other two fat treatments did not improve fat percent at all.”

milk, cows

Presenting the data as energy corrected milk – which takes into account not just milk yield, but protein and fat yield as well – all three treatments improved energy corrected milk compared to the control; the increase was greatest for the high palmitic acid treatment.

“Also what intrigued us in this study was when we looked at body weight change. Our palmitic acid and our palmitic acid / stearic acid treatments did not result in body weight change; that’s important in terms of that extra milk yield not coming at the expense of cows gaining body weight.

“What’s really interesting is the palmitic acid / oleic acid treatment actually increased body weight gain over the control treatment and also the palmitic acid / stearic acid treatment.

“That’s kind of interesting when you think of that palmitic acid / oleic acid treatment increasing energy corrected milk compared to the control and gaining more body weight compared to the control without eating more diet.

“We’ve been following up on the effect of this palmitic acid / oleic acid treatment. We have a number of lines of evidence that led us to conclude that we don’t really want stearic acid in a fat supplement.

“But we are very interested in the palmitic acid / oleic acid blend – the effects of what each of these fatty acids have and what the impact may be if we have different blends and ratios of these.”

Further studies have been undertaken using blends of palmitic acid and oleic acid – including a 80:10 ratio and a 60:30 ratio.

Comparing high-producing and low-producing (40-45kg/day at peak), post-peak, mid-lactation cows, the body weight effects of adding oleic acid to the cows’ diet were also observed.

“In the low-producing cows, it was actually the higher palmitic acid treatment (80:20) that gave us the best energy corrected milk response, mostly through increased milk fat yield.

“However, in the high group of cows (started at 50kg/day of milk), we saw a clear relationship as you increased the oleic acid content of the fat supplement; it gave us an increase in energy corrected milk.”

This, he said, indicated that cows at different levels of milk production respond differently to these different blends.

“The high-producing cows benefit from a higher blend of oleic acid than palmitic acid, whereas lower-producing cows benefit from a more palmitic acid enriched supplement,” he added.

A study was also completed to examine the effect of supplementing cows with palmitic acid in the first three weeks of lactation; the study was carried on to see what impact this had during the first 10 weeks of lactation. Again, a control group was used as part of the study.

Key results of palmitic acid supplementation:

  • No difference in terms of dry matter intake;
  • Cows fed palmitic acid during the peak period (weeks three-to-10 of lactation) increased milk yield by 3.5kg compared to the control cows – energy corrected milking increased by approximately 5kg;
  • Cows fed palmitic acid during the fresh period lost more body weight (approximately 25kg compared to the control).

The results of the above study focused the research efforts to looking at the impacts of using supplements with various ratios of palmitic and oleic acid. The initial findings of this research were presented at dairy science meetings this summer.

Along with a control group, high-producing, fresh cows were offered diets containing palmitic acid / oleic acid blends at different ratios – 80:10, 70:20 and 60:30.

Lock explained that the responses to the 80:10 ratio were similar to previous studies undertaken; but as the oleic acid content was increased, “fascinating” results were obtained.

“As you increase the oleic acid content in the diet, you are seeing increases in feed intake – more feed intake going into the cow and hopefully more energy going into the cow.

“By week two, those higher oleic acid treatments (70:20 and 60:30) are producing 4.5kg more energy corrected milk than the control group. And when we look at body weight, particularly for the 60:30, as we provide more oleic acid into that diet, those cows are not losing any more body weight than the control cows.”

The Irish context

When questioned on the possible response from oleic acid supplementation in pasture-based, lower-producing cows – typical of the Irish system, he said:

“The cows in our study were pretty high production. What I would expect is the partitioning differences we see would hold true in terms of the differences between palmitic and oleic acid.”

In the fresh cow, he added: “I would suspect that you would see some similar results. If you can get the same amount of milk while minimising body loss, I think that’s an attractive proposition and opportunity. It would be good to see that type of study under your situations.”

MegaMax

Lock’s presentation coincided with the launch of MegaMax – a fat supplement from Volac Wilmar – next week. The company already supplies a number of fat supplementation products, but the fatty acid profile in MegaMax is based on the work outlined above.

With this, Volac Wilmar hopes to provide its customers with a product containing a blend of palmitic and oleic acids, which will be targeted at early-lactation cows to minimise the effect of body condition loss.

Volac offers a strong technical back up through Dr. Richard Kirkland, technical director of Volac Wilmar, and Dr. John Newbold, technical director of Volac, who are available to support millers with any queries around fat usage.

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10 Best Sheepskin Slippers for Women: Cozy Comfort 2018 – Heavy.com

best sheepskin slippers for women


Amazon

The weather’s turning cool, and it’s time to dump those beloved flip flops and snuggle your tootsies into some seriously cozy comfort. If your closet doesn’t have a pair of the best sheepskin slippers for women, you’re missing out on the laziest way to kick around, indoors and out, in some seriously stylish shearling.

The beautiful thing about sheepskin, in addition to its softness and durability, is that it is temperature regulating. Much like goose down, sheep shearling keeps you toasting when it’s cold outside, and cool when it’s not. That means you can sport these awesome slippers year round, if you’d like.

We’ve featured a variety of styles, and also sheepskin from Australia and Mongolia. Wondering what makes each unique? According to the experts at Hides of Excellence, Icelandic sheepskin has uniquely warming properties, and that makes perfect sense if you think about that chilly mountainous terrain. Australian sheepskin has its own list of benefits, according to Auskin, with incredible durability at the top of the list.

Whichever you choose, you can count on the fact that you’ll find fun, fashionable and super cozy choices in an amazing array of styles, from ballet flats, to moccasins and even flip flops, just for you die-hards out there. We struggled with whether we should feature a classic shearling boot in our list of ladies sheepskin slippers, but opted out, because even though we happen to wear ours as slippers and shoes, you might not.

Right now inventories are plentiful, so it’s a great time to think about gifts for the upcoming holiday season, when slippers become awfully short in supply. You might want to start shopping for yourself and anyone else you’d like to pamper, because these furry, fluffy, fuzzy bits of wonderfulness simply won’t last for long.

What are the best sheepskin slippers for women?

  • Overland Women’s Emma Classic Sheepskin Slippers | Check it out on Amazon – $99
  • EMU Australia Women’s Jolie Slip-On Slipper | Check it out on Amazon – $69.95
  • UGG Women’s Lane Slipper | Check it out on Amazon – $59.99 – $90
  • Acorn Sheepskin Moxie Bootie Slipper | Check it out on Amazon – $76.94 – $150
  • BEARPAW Women’s Effie Slide Slipper | Check it out on Amazon – $35.86 – $59.95
  • Snugrugs Sheepskin Ballerina Slippers | Check it out on Amazon – $49.99 – $84.48
  • Old Friend Snowbird Ii Slip-on Slipper | Check it out on Amazon – $67.46 – $89.99
  • UGG Women’s Addison Slipper | Check it out on Amazon – $64.99 – $110
  • Ripa Himalayan Shearling Slipper Sandal | Check it out on Amazon – $73.95
  • UGG Women’s Dakota Moccasin Slipper | Check it out on Amazon – $100

1. Overland Women’s Emma Classic Sheepskin Slippers – $99

blue sheepskin shearling slipper bootsblue sheepskin shearling slipper boots

Overland

Pros: Cons:
  • Super cute and cozy
  • Made with natural sheepskin and real shearling
  • Good for indoor and outdoor wear
  • Can be worn as a fashion bootie
  • Only available in full sizes
  • Kind of expensive
  • Sticky soles make them trippy on rugs and carpet
  • Not very padded on the insole

These cozy sheepskin boots are the perfect fall and winter kicks for both indoor and outdoor wear. Whether you slip them on with some jeans or jammies, they’ll look stylish while keeping your tootsies warm and toasty. The soft suede sheepskin uppers are lined, and trimmed, with natural sheepskin shearling, which is renowned for its softness.

These cute blue booties have durable cowhide leather trim, and a high-traction thick rubber outsole. If blue isn’t your favorite color pick, no worries. These come in chestnut and classic gray as well. Keep in mind, these slippers only come in full sizes, so if you’re a half-size, you’ll want to order up.

Buy the Overland Women’s Emma Classic Sheepskin Slippers here.


2. EMU Australia Women’s Jolie Slip-On Slipper – $69.95

tan sheepskin leather shearling slide slippertan sheepskin leather shearling slide slipper

EMU Australia

Pros: Cons:
  • Super cute slide styling
  • Cushy sheepskin shearling keeps you cool or warm, depending on the season
  • Grippy, skid-free outsole
  • Lots of color options
  • Not all sizes available in every color
  • Not available in half sizes
  • Inside liner shows wear quickly
  • Darker color shearling tends to bleed on sweaty feet

There’s nothing easier to wear than a slide slipper, especially if it’s as squishy and warm as this one from EMU Australia. This ultra-luxe slide features a natural suede upper, and it is lined with naturally temperature regulating 100 percent Australian sheepskin shearling. That means these cute slides will keep your feet cozy warm in winter, and cool in summer.

These feature double-stitched construction for added durability. The dual-EVA sole provides skid-free support, and makes these perfect for a quick run to the paper or mail box. The rolled cuff is extra cute with a little notched out detail. While these slippers come in seven sumptuous colors, not all are available in every size. Darn, we wanted those red ones, which are most limited.

Buy the EMU Australia Women’s Jolie Slip-On Slipper here.


3. UGG Women’s Lane Slipper – $59.99 – $90

yellow ugg sheepskin slide slippersyellow ugg sheepskin slide slippers

UGG

Pros: Cons:
  • Minimalist profile
  • Conform to your foot shape with wear
  • Grippy and nubby rubber soles
  • Stylishly loafer-like
  • Spendy for slippers
  • Only come in full sizes
  • Don’t stay on as well as some of the bulkier slides

We rate these as the perfect minimalist sheepskin slides for the woman who doesn’t want that bulky shearling look. Sheepskin style leader, UGG stepped into the fashion foray with these cuties, that are anything but, and in spunky yellow, no less. The sweet suede upper features the signature UGG metal logo on the sides, and the notched style over the shank adds another classic fashion twist.

With just a hint of shearling peeping out from the double seams, the cozy insole is lined with 7mm natural sheepskin for consummate comfort and warmth. These slippers actually mold to your feet with consistent wear, and the nubby rubber soles deliver both excellent traction and added padding for your feet. These too come in full sizes only, and you can get them in five fashion-worthy colors.

Buy the UGG Women’s Lane Slipper here.


4. Acorn Women’s Sheepskin Moxie Bootie Slipper – $76.94 – $150

brown sheepskin moccasin bootie slippersbrown sheepskin moccasin bootie slippers

Acorn

Pros: Cons:
  • Two different styles and three ways to wear them
  • Natural sheepskin shearling is moisture wicking
  • Grippy soles keep you on your feet
  • Extra warm and cozy
  • Kind of expensive
  • Tend to run small
  • Limited stock in some sizes
  • A bit heavy compared to some

Perhaps you don’t want to spend a ton on two pairs of sheepskin slippers, but you want two different styles. These kicks offer the best of two worlds – the moccasin and the bootie. With a convertible tongue and high sides, you can wear these three ways. Slip them on with the sides up and the tongue down; fold sides and tongue down; or lace them up like a classic shearling bootie.

These slippers feature a cozy sheepskin shearling lining that naturally wicks moisture and is hypoallergenic and biodegradable. The contrasting moc-toe stitching adds to their style, and rugged rawhide laces secure these winter warmies. They have a skid-resistant rubber driver outsole, to keep you safely on your feet, even in inclement weather. These slippers come in four different colors and a wide range of full sizes. Acorn also offers a classic sheepskin moccasin if you prefer the traditional style.

Buy the Acorn Women’s Sheepskin Moxie Bootie Slipper here.


5. BEARPAW Women’s Effie Slide Slipper – $35.86 – $59.95

cream knit and sheepskin shearling slide slippercream knit and sheepskin shearling slide slipper

BEARPAW

Pros: Cons:
  • Top rated
  • Super comfy and warm
  • Perfect with knits and casual wear
  • Rubber sole makes them indoor and outdoor friendly
  • Not as waterproof as solid leather slippers
  • Must be air-dried
  • Full sizes only
  • They tend to run small so size up

Absolutely perfect for sweather season, these sheepskin slippers for women are a cute combination of mock cable knit and natural sheepskin shearling. The fleecy collar keeps warmth in, and the lightweight knit top feels and looks so fashion forward. The cow skin upper is double stitched to secure the knit top to the thick and cushy rubber sole.

These feature a wool blend lining, with a sheepskin comfort footbed, and at the price, you can’t beat them as most sizes are right around fifty bucks. They’re so cozy and cute, you’ll want to wear them everywhere. Get them in women’s sizes from 5M to 12M. You can also find these in darker knit colors and a few half sizes.

Buy the BEARPAW Women’s Effie Slide Slipper here.


6. Snugrugs Elena Women’s Sheepskin Ballerina Slippers – $49.99 – $84.48

brown sheepskin ballet slippersbrown sheepskin ballet slippers

Snugrugs

Pros: Cons:
  • Adorable ballerina styling
  • Super cozy and warm
  • Suede soles don’t catch on carpets or rugs
  • Very well made
  • Strictly for indoor wear
  • Runs small
  • Some limited size availability in other colors

Not all the best sheepskin slippers for women are the same. If you’re not a fan the bulky looking traditional shearling slippers, or you think slips are strictly indoor wear, these cuties will have you toe-dancing with glee. These ballet slippers deliver all that delicious cozy comfort, in a petite looking style that gives you the perfect excuse to stay inside in your jammies.

These chic shearling slippers feature a suede sole, so no worries about tripping up on your carpets and rugs, but you won’t want to wear them outdoors. Keep in mind, these sweet shoes run on the small side, so you may want to size up when you order. Oh, and you can get them in a ridiculously cute pastel pink, as well as dusty gray.

Buy the Snugrugs Elena Women’s Sheepskin Ballerina Slippers here.


7. Old Friend Women’s Snowbird Ii Slip-on Slipper – $67.46 – $89.99

chestnut sheepskin shearling slip on slipperschestnut sheepskin shearling slip on slippers

Old Friend

Pros: Cons:
  • Awesome outdoor styling
  • High sculptured sole keeps feet out of the weather
  • 100 percent sheepskin insole
  • Adds a bit of height to your equation
  • They run quite small
  • Dye can run when wet
  • Reports of a funny fur odor

Perfect for aprés ski, or before and aprés almost anything else, these sweet slip-ons are almost like sheepskin clogs. The fun pieced suede upper features trendy whip-stitching up the center, and zig zag details on the sides. Lined with cozy sheep fur you can bank on the fact that your feet will stay toasty no matter the temperature.

What makes these slippers a real standout is their beefy dual-density rubber outsole, and overlapping toe piece. Those features gives you some added height when you wear them with jeans or leggings, but they also keep you up and out of the water in the rain. That makes these a great choice for wearing nearly everywhere. The rugged tread pattern on the sole keeps you solid on your feet, even if the ground gets a little slippery. You can also find these sweet kicks in black right here.

Buy the Old Friend Women’s Snowbird Ii Slip-on Slipper here.


8. UGG Women’s Addison Slipper – $64.99 – $110

lavender plush sheepskin slipperslavender plush sheepskin slippers

UGG

Pros: Cons:
  • The next best thing to bunny slippers
  • Natural curly lamb fur keeps feet cozy
  • Adorable bow is a cuteness overload
  • Rubber sole allows for limited outdoor use
  • Not particularly practical
  • Feel a bit stiff at first
  • Fleece liner shows wear a bit quickly
  • They stretch out quite a lot

Just in case you think you’re too old for bunny slippers, you can fake the look perfectly in these seriously adorable furry slides from UGG. Plush curly lamb sheepskin surrounds your tootsies in luxurious pillowy softness, while a soft foam midsole makes them ridiculously comfortable. And did we even talk about that satin bow on the front? C’mon – it’s a cuteness overload!

These stylish house slippers feature the UGG logo rivet, so you know you’re getting the real deal, from one of the best brands around. While it has a rubber outsole suited for the outdoors, you might want to keep these cuties inside so as not to mar their fluffy exterior. You can also get them in gray or a peachy tan shade.

If you dig that fluffy look, with not quite so much fur, you might love the UGG Fluff Momma Mongolian Sheepskin Clog that comes in pink, white or gray.

Buy the UGG Women’s Addison Slipper here.


9. Ripa Himalayan Shearling Slipper Sandal – $73.95

red sheepskin shearling flip-flop slippersred sheepskin shearling flip-flop slippers

Ripa

Pros: Cons:
  • The best blend of slipper and flip flop
  • Soft shearling lined straps are easy on the feet
  • Great sport design for both indoor and outdoor wear
  • They deliver good Karma
  • Kind of spendy for a slipper sandal
  • Not the best for the coldest climates
  • No cushy liner
  • Shearling has questionable wear

Alright, let’s be honest about just how hard it is to toss those flip-flops into the closet at the end of summer, and slip into something more sensible for fall and winter. Guess what? Forget about it! You can have all the cozy comfort of your fave flops, but with all the warmth and softness of sheepskin shearling. It’s true.

These slipper sandals from Ripa give you the best of both worlds. The natural shearling foot bed molds to your feet, keeping you warm, yet the thong style upper is breathable leaving your toes to bask in fresh air. The shearling lined suede straps never cut into your feet. The patented cushion sport design features a non-marking ribbed rubber sole for traction and support.

These slippers have a couple of sneaky secrets you’ll love. First, they feature embedded red lifelines in the sole, meant to bring you good Karma, and second, they come in sizes for both men and women, so if you pick a pair for your sweetie, he’s going to shower you with good fortune. They come in five different gender neutral colors.

Buy the Ripa Himalayan Shearling Slipper Sandal here.


10. UGG Women’s Dakota Moccasin Slipper – $100

UGG rust sheepskin shearling moccasin slippersUGG rust sheepskin shearling moccasin slippers

UGG

Pros: Cons:
  • Classic moccasin styling
  • Water and stain resistant uppers
  • Super thick shearling insole
  • Non-skid rubber sole for outdoor durability
  • A bite to your budget
  • Some limited size availability in certain colors
  • Tough to clean the inner liner
  • Kind of stiff when new

We couldn’t complete our list of slippers without adding a classic moccasin to our picks, and this top rated moc from UGGs is a favorite for sure. You’ll love this loafer for both indoor and outdoor wear because it features a water-resistant Silkee suede upper, that’s super soft and yet durable. Because it repels both water and stains, you’ll never need to worry about that early morning coffee spill.

These ladies sheepskin slippers are fully lined with pure furry wool, and the insoles feature a thick 17mm of the same, for incredible comfort, even after hours of wear. The UGG patterned rubber sole keeps slips at bay, and these are actually cute enough you could probably slip them on with some slacks and no one would be the wiser.

These come in a myriad of colors from agave to regatta blue, but do be aware that not all colors are available in all sizes, which is just a bit of a bummer.

Buy the UGG Women’s Dakota Moccasin Slipper here.


See Also:

• Best Plus Size Winter Coats
• Best Winter Boots for Women


Heavy, Inc. is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to Amazon. Our product recommendations are guided solely by our editors. We have no relationship with manufacturers.

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BeefTalk: Cows as Combines – Tri-State Livestock News

Cows are harvesters, sort of a biological combine, and dining on crop aftermath can be a real component to profitable commercial beef production.

Yes, bison, yaks and many other four-legged precursors were company competitors, but as far as production units, the cow combines win out. Cow combine units come in various colors, depending on the dealer one chooses, but all have pretty good track records.

Mixing and matching the header unit with the combine unit is possible and certainly a producer’s choice, realizing that many producers prefer a solid-colored unit. But keep in mind, the performance level of the mixed unit seems to have more production capacity than the straight units.

The use of cows as biological combines is not new, and the Dickinson Research Extension Center has been studying the impact of extended grazing in extensive beef cattle operations for many years. All these studies have a common outcome; that is, cow-calf producers tend to underutilize their cows when harvesting forage. Some harvesting opportunities simply never are utilized.

More recently, beginning in 2016, center scientists Songul Senturklu and Doug Landblom tested several harvesting units under various scenarios. The results were amazing. The units that only harvested grass were more expensive because their overwintering costs were greater, $209 per unit. Interestingly, finding some more cropland and cover crop to harvest into the fall reduced wintering costs by almost a third (32.5 percent), to $141.

So, carrying that thought farther, letting those harvesting units go around the agronomic fields a second or third time and complete a late harvest of standing summer grass growth cut the overwinter charges by more than two-thirds (65.1 percent), to $73. No question about it: The cow is the vehicle to harvest fall plant growth.

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This win-win scenario lowers costs and improves production maintenance of the cow. That leads to another thought: Cows need to be in good condition at calving next spring and even better condition at breeding next summer.

The middle three months of gestation, or pregnancy, in other words, are the time to improve cow condition. Can this be accomplished while the cows are harvesting well into later fall to early winter?

The answer is “yes,” but keep in mind that herd management and calving dates also need to focus on grazing. In other words, calve on growing grass in the spring to maximize a cow’s grazing potential.

But fall crop aftermath grazing is beneficial regardless of calving time. Right now, cow milk production is decreasing for spring-calving cows, the weather is favorable and, generally, crop aftermath is bountiful. When moisture tends to run short, grain production acreage often is shifted into potential cow feed.

While crop production has many variables, standing plants are meant to be tasted. I always ponder, when I drive by fields that are not fenced nor have access to water, how much a cow would enjoy that field. A moderate-milking, 1,300-pound cow would like to eat her fill of good, green grass prior to weaning, actually eating all that she can to produce milk.

After weaning, that same cow keeps eating if feed is available. When a cow eats above her requirements, she gains weight. In this case, replacing the weight she lost raising her calf, along with adding more body condition (commonly called fat) in preparation for winter, is the hoped-for scenario. Now that is the scenario cow-calf producers like.

Because the third trimester of gestation has not been reached, milk production ceases at weaning and good weather provides the opportunity to utilize cheaper feed resources. Essentially, the cow will eat in excess of her requirements in the crop aftermath buffet.

In addition, a good management option is to sort the thinner cows and send them to the best fall pastures. One scenario is to consider weaning the calves of those cows early, reducing the milking stress on their mothers. The fall pastures will put the needed feed in front of the thinner cows and the cows will improve their body condition score.

In the meantime, the moderately to heavier-conditioned cows can be grazing areas that are less lush. However, most producers will let all their cows enjoy fall aftermath grazing, keeping life simple. All the cows should respond with increased conditioning and be better prepared for winter and next year’s calving and breeding.

Remember that when the third trimester of pregnancy starts, rebalance the ration and involve your local nutritionist to develop a proper herd nutritional program. Also remember to keep an eye on the cattle, identify potential fall plant toxicity and visit your local Extension agent, particularly if you are implementing new grazing strategies. Input is always good.

May you find all your ear tags.

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Owner of cow killed in Embden, alleged shooter both charged – Biddeford Journal Tribune

Police say Sophie, a three-year-old Holstein heifer, was shot and killed by a neighbor of her owners after causing damage to an SUV. Contributed photo courtesy of Nikkia Danforth

Both the owner of a pet cow shot and killed in Embden last week and the alleged shooter have been summonsed on charges in connection with the animal’s death, police said.

Jaime Danforth, 40, of Embden, was summonsed Wednesday for animal trespass, a civil violation, Somerset County Sheriff Dale Lancaster said in a news release.

Mason Sparrow, 24, of Embden, was summonsed for cruelty to animals.

Sparrow allegedly shot and killed Sophie, a 3-year-old Holstein heifer, after the cow escaped from its pen and wandered onto neighboring property where Sparrow has been staying and damaged an SUV.

The sheriff’s office investigated the case and consulted with the state director of animal welfare and the Somerset County District Attorney’s Office before filing the charges, Lancaster said.

“Sheriff Lancaster would like to advise everyone that owners are responsible for maintaining control of their domestic animals,” the release said. “The law is also clear that you cannot kill a domestic animal belonging to another person without their consent. If a domestic animal is trespassing on your property, you do have recourse.”

Lancaster said Sparrow did not contact animal control until after the cow had been shot, though he said contacting animal control should be the first step in dealing with animal complaints.

“If you do not reach a satisfactory resolution, you may contact the Town Office, who is responsible for hiring that animal control officer,” Lancaster said. “If a domestic animal does damage to your property, recourse occurs through the civil court system.”

Pat Nelson, animal control officer in Embden, did not respond immediately to a phone call seeking comment Thursday night.

Neither Danforth nor Sparrow could be reached.

Amber Richardson, Danforth’s niece, said last week the family had been hoping Sparrow would be charged for the loss of their pet, as they thought it was unfair to shoot the cow without notifying the family it had gotten loose.

She said her two teenage cousins were home alone when they found out from law enforcement officials their cow had been shot.

“All they had to do was come down and say, ‘Sophie is out,’ and the girls would have gotten the grain bucket,” Richardson said. “Once you go and jingle it, she would have gone home. He didn’t even notify them Sophie was out. He killed her, then called the animal control officer and sheriff. She was already dead when they reported it.”

Danforth is scheduled to appear in court Nov. 14 at the Somerset County Unified Court. Sparrow is scheduled for Nov. 7 at the same court.

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Xinhua Headlines: A taste of Tibet's pioneering spirit – Xinhua

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Xinhua Headlines: A taste of Tibet's pioneering spirit

Foreigners visit the Fourth China Tibet Tourism and Culture Expo in Lhasa, capital of southwest China’s Tibet Autonomous Region, Sept. 10, 2018. (Xinhua/Chogo)

by Xinhua writers Cheng Yunjie and Bai Shaobo

LHASA, Sept. 11 (Xinhua) — Sicho Dorje couldn’t be more familiar with the taste of air-dried yak meat. For generations, Tibetan herders without refrigerators had yak meat air-dried in winter, sometimes stored it in sheds made of cow dung, and ate it with Tsampa, the roasted barley flour, and buttered tea all year round.

Growing up eating air-dried yak meat in northern Tibet, the 29-year-old is now doing what he calls “a pioneering job”: providing customers with the freshest yak meat possible.

Because his company, Changtang Animal Husbandry Development Company, has a cold chain logistics service, he can sell dozens of chilled yak meat products across China.

“It takes 72 hours to deliver our yak meat to Beijing and 40 hours to Chengdu. In Zhejiang, our minced beef balls sell quite well,” said Sicho Dorje, who leads the company’s marketing department.

Marrow bones which used to be smashed for soup braising in herders’ kitchens have now appeared in the fast-frozen food counters of supermarkets, neatly sliced and packaged to retain freshness.

“The old-generation of herders lacked market awareness and seldom thought about how to tap the market. Since stock breeding is the most profitable industry on the Plateau, our job is to figure out how to be competitive,” he said.

This year, the company, established less than two years ago, is expected to achieve 360 million yuan (about 52.5 million U.S. dollars) in output value.

“We are confident about the market, as yak meat customers value freshness and nutrition,” he said.

NEW TASTES

At the Fourth China Tibet Tourism and Culture Expo, many Tibetan enterprises like Changtang Animal Husbandry set up booths to display their products.

The black fungus that grows in the withered branches of silk oak trees in Yatung County of southern Tibet, reserved for nobles and a tribute to the Panchen Lama in old Tibet, has been turned into health care drinks.

Wild alpine roses appeared on an exhibition booth in the form of Tibetan perfume processed using an ancient technique, with their aroma able to stay on the skin for almost seven days.

Organically-produced Tibetan eggs were also a hit, costing 20 yuan each, much more expensive than regular eggs.

Tibetan farmers with an organic egg farm in Lhozhag County even discovered four different flavors of the eggs based on how long they are boiled.

Li Guowei, a manager with China National Cereals, Oils, and Foodstuffs Corporation (COFCO) who is familiar with the development of the egg farm, said Tibetan farmers have never been so attentive to standardized production, and never been so market-oriented.

The competition among mineral water producers was fierce at the expo, as there are already 35 natural drinking water companies in Tibet. Last year, the industry produced nearly 800,000 tonnes of natural drinking water with an aggregate output value of 1.58 billion yuan, up 28.17 percent from a year earlier.

Although mineral water is tasteless, Droma, a sales clerk with a mineral water company, said there was a small difference in mouthfeel, reflecting the disparity in mineral content, which might appeal to different customers.

Embracing the market, fearing no competition and exploring a type of business to magnify their advantages have become the standard features of Tibet’s booming entrepreneurs, according to Li Guowei, who has been working in Tibet for nine years.

SENSE OF MISSION

The entrepreneurial spirit, as Qizhala, chairman of the Tibetan Autonomous Region, noted at the expo, is powered by the aspiration to get rid of poverty and a sense of purpose to explore a sustainable, eco-friendly economy on the Plateau.

“Inheritance and pioneering are most needed in Tibet as there is no ready-made development path for Tibet to take. No other regions face such a grand challenge as Tibet does in terms of pursuing high-quality development,” said Qizhala. “When growing the economy, Tibet must consider the land’s environmental bearing capacity, prioritize ecological protection and minimize environmental costs.”

For decades, Tibet has largely depended on the fiscal input of the central government and the support of other developed provinces as well as the centrally-administered state-owned enterprises for development.

The success of each entrepreneurship program often concerns many poverty-stricken households. Sicho Dorje’s fast-frozen yak meat business, for instance, has signed up 3,000 impoverished herders, while the Tibetan egg farm in Lhozhag County hires 51 local farmers.

When the industrial revolution swept the world in the 19th century, Tibet’s economy under serfdom was static, and the region completely missed it, said Qizhala.

Now after 40 years of opening-up and reform of the Chinese economy, Tibetans have accumulated sufficient knowledge to explore a proper development path on the Plateau, said Qizhala.

ASPIRATION TO BE EXCELLENT

Kesang Tashi, 75, runs Khawachen Carpet and Wool Handicraft company, where Tibetan craftsmen use ancient techniques of yarn spinning, hand dying, weaving, washing and finishing to make rugs with certified northern Tibet highland sheep wool, one of the best in the world.

Haunted by the question about why Tibet has the best wool in the world but couldn’t produce the world’s best rugs, Kesang Tashi established Khawachen many years ago and has been striving to make a difference.

The Khawachen rugs fusing Tibet’s traditional designs rich in cultural significance with modern aesthetics have been sold to Japan, Britain, the United States, Germany, and Australia.

At the expo, Khawachen rugs were quite popular due to their unique colors and floral designs.

In Kesang Tashi’s opinions, a good rug deserves the greetings from its users. “When you enter the room and see the rug, you should put your palms together and say ‘Tashi Delek,’ which will bring good vibes and brighten up your mind,” he said.

But Khawachen is not the only Tibetan company seeking to revive Tibetan crafts in the modern economy.

Phudreng, who runs a Tibetan folk product company in Lhasa, the regional capital, spent ten years developing a rose-scented Tibetan perfume with the hope that one day Tibetan perfume could be as famous as French perfume.

Starting her business in a small workshop, Phudreng never lost heart in promoting the Tibetan traditional handicraft despite the difficulties she encountered.

Growing up with a tough living environment, Tibetan entrepreneurs tend to be optimistic and full of passion with what they have been doing.

For Sicho Dorje, the next step for his marketing team is to survey the overseas market to increase exports.

“I am sure our yak meat tastes better than Kobe beef and Australian beef, as no other grasslands across the world can rival our Changtang plateau,” he said.

(Video editors: Zhu Cong, Zhu Jianhui)

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Cow milk, Divya Jal, french fries and more: Ramdev's Patanjali announces new products – Economic Times

Yoga guru Baba Ramdev’s Patanjali has now added few more products to its kitty which include cow milk, curd, flavoured milk, buttermilk and cheese. The company, which had earlier launched noodles, will now start selling french fries too.

The Haridwar-based firm has established a network of around 56,000 retailers and hopes to generage Rs 1,000 crore revenue by 2020 with these additional products. Patanjali said it aims to get Rs 500 crore from dairy products in this fiscal itself.

The company is planning to sell its dairy products in Tetra pack. Our milk would be cheaper than other established brands by Rs 2, said Ramdev while addressing a conference.

We are targeting 10 lakh litre of daily sales, Ramdev added.

In a press statement, Patanjali said that it produced 4 lakh litres of cow milk on the very first day of its operation. It has tied up with around 56,000 retailers and vendors to supply milk across Delhi-NCR, Mumbai, Pune and Rajasthan and expects to produce 10 lakh litres of cow milk every day in the financial year 2019-2020.

The company has also made a foray into frozen vegetables like peas, sweet corn, mixed vegetables, urea free cattle feed, and solar panel production. Patanjali will offer the frozen vegetables at half the cost of its competition. It plans to sell packaged drinking water under the brand name Divya Jal in pack size of 250 ml, 500 ml, 1 litre, 2 litres, 5 litres and 20 litres.

Earlier this year Patanjali had announced to launch swadeshi jeans by this year end.

Patanjali Ayurved is struggling in recent times. Its growth faltered during the past 12 months as rivals, mostly multinationals, launched natural and herbal products to counter the challenge of the Baba Ramdev-led enterprise.

Patanjali’s sales volumes grew 7% during October-March 2018 and 22% in April-September 2017, according to data from Kantar Worldpanel, a global consumer research firm. That’s a sharp fall from 52% growth in October-March 2017 and 49% during April-September 2016.

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BMW says EV owners can turn i3 into 'cash cow', use more solar power with controllable load tech – Electrek

Over the past 3 years, BMW has been running a trial of its ‘ChargeForward’ program with BMW i3 owners willing to automatically delay the charging of their vehicle at the request of their local electric utility, PG&E, in order to offset peak demand.

BMW is presenting the results of the trial and says that electric car owners can turn i3 into ‘cash cow’ and use more solar power with controllable load technology

The idea is quite simple. Under the program, PG&E can request BMW to delay the charging sessions of BMW i3 owners by up to an hour in order to reduce the load.

Instead, the owners are incentivized to charge for cheaper when renewable energy production is higher.

In return, owners are compensated for the possible inconvenience. For the first trial run, owners received a $1,000 “gift card” at the launch of the program and they were able to get up to $540 more based on how their charging sessions were affected. BMW is actually reducing the rewards for the second round, presumably because they realized that it was a lot of money for what they were asking of the i3 owners.

It’s important to note that owners can easily temporarily opt out of the program before starting a charging session if they absolutely need to charge. But if your car needs to charge, but it’s not urgent, you plug it in and if PG&E needs to offset demand, they will delay it and your car will take up to one more hour to charge.

At the Governor’s Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco this week, the BMW and PG&E are presenting the results.

They listed the main findings:

  • Electric vehicles can help stabilizing the public grid and maximizing the portion of renewables.
  • Drivers are willing to change their charging habits in order to align with renewables, given the right messaging and incentives.
  • Energy companies can help increase daytime charging with renewables by supporting companies in adding workplace charging.
  • Sharing data with other drivers is a motivator for many participants.
  • Programmes like ChargeForward improve customers’ understanding of how the grid works, which helps them become more educated energy consumers.

They found the trial to be successful in saving money for the owners in increasing renewable energy use.

Dr. Joachim Kolling, Head of BMW Group Mobility and Energy Services, said about the

“Our target is to offer charging power generated with the lowest possible CO2 emissions at most attractive prices to drivers of our electric cars”,

BMW says that the i3 owners in the program charged they cars with 56% renewable energy versus over 22% of renewable energy use in California.

The German automaker says that 350 electric vehicle owners are now part of the trial.

A recent study showed that controlling the power load like this could result in advantages in the billions of dollars and it would enable the grid to take better advantage of renewable energy.

It is important to note that this isn’t vehicle to grid technology that Nissan is touting. That will allow even more control over loads and could also offer EV drivers a bigger incentive.

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A taste of Tibet's pioneering spirit – ecns

Foreigners visit the Fourth China Tibet Tourism and Culture Expo in Lhasa, capital of southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, Sept. 10, 2018. (Xinhua/Chogo)

Foreigners visit the Fourth China Tibet Tourism and Culture Expo in Lhasa, capital of southwest China’s Tibet Autonomous Region, Sept. 10, 2018. (Xinhua/Chogo)

Sicho Dorje couldn’t be more familiar with the taste of air-dried yak meat. For generations, Tibetan herders without refrigerators had yak meat air-dried in winter, sometimes stored it in sheds made of cow dung, and ate it with Tsampa, the roasted barley flour, and buttered tea all year round.

Growing up eating air-dried yak meat in northern Tibet, the 29-year-old is now doing what he calls “a pioneering job”: providing customers with the freshest yak meat possible.

Because his company, Changtang Animal Husbandry Development Company, has a cold chain logistics service, he can sell dozens of chilled yak meat products across China.

“It takes 72 hours to deliver our yak meat to Beijing and 40 hours to Chengdu. In Zhejiang, our minced beef balls sell quite well,” said Sicho Dorje, who leads the company’s marketing department.

Marrow bones which used to be smashed for soup braising in herders’ kitchens have now appeared in the fast-frozen food counters of supermarkets, neatly sliced and packaged to retain freshness.

“The old-generation of herders lacked market awareness and seldom thought about how to tap the market. Since stock breeding is the most profitable industry on the Plateau, our job is to figure out how to be competitive,” he said.

This year, the company, established less than two years ago, is expected to achieve 360 million yuan (about 52.5 million U.S. dollars) in output value.

“We are confident about the market, as yak meat customers value freshness and nutrition,” he said.

NEW TASTES

At the Fourth China Tibet Tourism and Culture Expo, many Tibetan enterprises like Changtang Animal Husbandry set up booths to display their products.

The black fungus that grows in the withered branches of silk oak trees in Yatung County of southern Tibet, reserved for nobles and a tribute to the Panchen Lama in old Tibet, has been turned into health care drinks.

Wild alpine roses appeared on an exhibition booth in the form of Tibetan perfume processed using an ancient technique, with their aroma able to stay on the skin for almost seven days.

Organically-produced Tibetan eggs were also a hit, costing 20 yuan each, much more expensive than regular eggs.

Tibetan farmers with an organic egg farm in Lhozhag County even discovered four different flavors of the eggs based on how long they are boiled.

Li Guowei, a manager with China National Cereals, Oils, and Foodstuffs Corporation (COFCO) who is familiar with the development of the egg farm, said Tibetan farmers have never been so attentive to standardized production, and never been so market-oriented.

The competition among mineral water producers was fierce at the expo, as there are already 35 natural drinking water companies in Tibet. Last year, the industry produced nearly 800,000 tonnes of natural drinking water with an aggregate output value of 1.58 billion yuan, up 28.17 percent from a year earlier.

Although mineral water is tasteless, Droma, a sales clerk with a mineral water company, said there was a small difference in mouthfeel, reflecting the disparity in mineral content, which might appeal to different customers.

Embracing the market, fearing no competition and exploring a type of business to magnify their advantages have become the standard features of Tibet’s booming entrepreneurs, according to Li Guowei, who has been working in Tibet for nine years.

SENSE OF MISSION

The entrepreneurial spirit, as Qizhala, chairman of the Tibetan Autonomous Region, noted at the expo, is powered by the aspiration to get rid of poverty and a sense of purpose to explore a sustainable, eco-friendly economy on the Plateau.

“Inheritance and pioneering are most needed in Tibet as there is no ready-made development path for Tibet to take. No other regions face such a grand challenge as Tibet does in terms of pursuing high-quality development,” said Qizhala. “When growing the economy, Tibet must consider the land’s environmental bearing capacity, prioritize ecological protection and minimize environmental costs.”

For decades, Tibet has largely depended on the fiscal input of the central government and the support of other developed provinces as well as the centrally-administered state-owned enterprises for development.

The success of each entrepreneurship program often concerns many poverty-stricken households. Sicho Dorje’s fast-frozen yak meat business, for instance, has signed up 3,000 impoverished herders, while the Tibetan egg farm in Lhozhag County hires 51 local farmers.

When the industrial revolution swept the world in the 19th century, Tibet’s economy under serfdom was static, and the region completely missed it, said Qizhala.

Now after 40 years of opening-up and reform of the Chinese economy, Tibetans have accumulated sufficient knowledge to explore a proper development path on the Plateau, said Qizhala.

ASPIRATION TO BE EXCELLENT

Kesang Tashi, 75, runs Khawachen Carpet and Wool Handicraft company, where Tibetan craftsmen use ancient techniques of yarn spinning, hand dying, weaving, washing and finishing to make rugs with certified northern Tibet highland sheep wool, one of the best in the world.

Haunted by the question about why Tibet has the best wool in the world but couldn’t produce the world’s best rugs, Kesang Tashi established Khawachen many years ago and has been striving to make a difference.

The Khawachen rugs fusing Tibet’s traditional designs rich in cultural significance with modern aesthetics have been sold to Japan, Britain, the United States, Germany, and Australia.

At the expo, Khawachen rugs were quite popular due to their unique colors and floral designs.

In Kesang Tashi’s opinions, a good rug deserves the greetings from its users. “When you enter the room and see the rug, you should put your palms together and say ‘Tashi Delek,’ which will bring good vibes and brighten up your mind,” he said.

But Khawachen is not the only Tibetan company seeking to revive Tibetan crafts in the modern economy.

Phudreng, who runs a Tibetan folk product company in Lhasa, the regional capital, spent ten years developing a rose-scented Tibetan perfume with the hope that one day Tibetan perfume could be as famous as French perfume.

Starting her business in a small workshop, Phudreng never lost heart in promoting the Tibetan traditional handicraft despite the difficulties she encountered.

Growing up with a tough living environment, Tibetan entrepreneurs tend to be optimistic and full of passion with what they have been doing.

For Sicho Dorje, the next step for his marketing team is to survey the overseas market to increase exports.

“I am sure our yak meat tastes better than Kobe beef and Australian beef, as no other grasslands across the world can rival our Changtang plateau,” he said.

  

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Watch: What Do Steaks From a 15-Year-Old Cow Taste Like? – Eater

“Before 1940, the average age of a harvested animal was 4 to 5 years. Now, it’s 12 to 15 months,” according to Kinderhook Farm farmer Lee Ranney. The Prime Time duo, Ben Turley and Brent Young, meet with Ranney on his farm in Valtie, New York, to compare three different grass-fed cows: 28 months old, 8 years old, and 15 years old.

Typically, Turley and Young receive 28-month-old beef at their New York butcher shop, the Meat Hook, so it’s the first time either of them have tried something with so much age. Of the 8-year-old beef, Turley notes: “That’s the kind of steak [you’re looking for] when you go to a steakhouse and get the 120-day dry-aged steak, but that’s not dry-aged at all.”

“This is just what beef should be,” echoes Young.

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