MU Extension project helps 93-year-old farmer – Houston Herald

Farmers like 93-year-old Harry Keutzer don’t quit just because their body parts slow down.

His hens, cows and pets depend on him. So do customers at the Kansas City-area farmers markets where he sells produce, eggs and hand-loomed rugs.

The Missouri AgrAbility Project, through University of Missouri Extension, Lincoln University Cooperative Extension and the Brain Injury Association of Missouri, provides aging farmers with information, referrals and a variety of resources to keep working.

Lincoln University Extension farm and AgrAbility outreach worker Susan Jaster carried out an assessment of accessibility at Keutzer’s Lafayette County farm and made recommendations on how to make the home safer and more accessible.

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Harry Keutzer

HARRY KEUTZER

MU Extension state health and safety specialist Karen Funkenbusch said AgrAbility helps farmers with disabilities caused by age, injury or illness to keep farming. The program provides research-based information and appropriate referrals to other agencies as needed.

America’s farm population has been aging rapidly over the last 30 years. According to the USDA’s 2012 Census of Agriculture, released in 2014, the average age of U.S. farmers is 58.3 years. There are now more farmers over 75 than between the ages of 35 and 44, Funkenbusch said.

Keutzer and his daughter-in-law, Stacy, grew 3,000 tomato plants in a high tunnel last year. They also planted a three-acre garden and put in a large plot of potatoes on a neighbor’s garden spot. Stacy picks all of the produce and Harry sorts it. Both wash and pack it.

Mobility is a challenge. When it rains, Keutzer has to stay inside and can’t work. But Keutzer’s energy level and stamina during the three-hour farm assessment surprised Jaster.

“He has the energy and deserves to be able to carry on his active life,” she said.

AgrAbility recommended a different type of scooter to reduce fatigue and help him maneuver around the farm over muddy and rough ground. The program also recommended a hydraulic lift to move pallets from the ground to make it easier to load produce onto the enclosed truck the Keutzers take to farmers markets.

Harry’s weathered hands are rarely idle and his mind remains active with farmer ingenuity. He finds it increasingly difficult to plant, so he and his son, Virgil, built a transplanter for their small tractor. It plants and waters the plant plug and lays weed-barrier plastic.

He uses his scooter to check on 100 chickens and takes buckets of water to livestock. He milks a three-teated cow that provides milk for two calves and a gallon a day for milk, butter, homemade ice cream and tapioca for the Keutzers.

He still enjoys cutting wood. He makes wine and helps his daughter-in-law cut fabric strips to make into loomed rugs. In October, he assisted a calving cow with a difficult birth.

Keutzer grew up working with his brothers on his father’s 500-acre farm at Creighton, Mo. He was so small when he started milking cows that his father had a special milking stool made for him.

He went to a country school until eighth grade. He said boys carried .22-caliber single-shot rifles to school, shooting rabbits and squirrels along the way to feed their families. And all boys had a two-bladed pocketknife, he says, to skin wild game and play “mumblepeg” at recess.

After school each day, he listened to 15 minutes of the Tom Mix cowboy show on the radio before starting chores. The radio wasn’t turned on again until 9:30 p.m., when the family listened to “Amos ’n’ Andy” and the news.

He farmed with a team of horses before buying his first tractor, a Farmall F-20. In 1942, Harry bought his second tractor, an Allis-Chalmers WC, at auction for $870.

He and other farmers anxiously awaited electrification through REA. On Jan. 7, 1945, he and his wife, Johnnie, celebrated her birthday in nearby Clinton. They returned home to a house lit with electricity, and their new Montgomery Ward refrigerator was plugged in and running.

He, his wife and a hired hand traveled the area baling hay from spring to fall. His wife drove the tractor as he put the 8 ½-foot wires into the baler. The hired hand tied the bales. It was hard work, but Keutzer and his wife made enough money to buy a new Kaiser automobile with cash.

In 1952, the Keutzers moved to southern Minnesota, where his uncles lived. He rented 320 acres on shares and was one of the first to plant soybean. Corn was selling for $1.25 a bushel under a government price-protection system.

Times were different then, Harry recalls. Farm implement dealers and oil companies helped young farmers get started by extending credit until crops were sold. He bought a four-row cultivator, planter, disk, a new corn picker and two new tractors – a John Deere 720 diesel and an IH Farmall 400 – on credit.

He and Johnnie also opened their home to 50 foster children during their time in Minnesota. The dinner table was often set for more than 20. He taught the children the value of rural life, hard work and being self-sufficient.

In 1959, his father quit farming and he returned to Missouri. Harry rented the farm next to his father’s and had 1,000 acres of South Grand River bottomland.

They farmed the home place until 1972, when Truman Reservoir took much of their land. They sold out and returned to Minnesota to a 45-head dairy farm.

His son met Stacy and married. She wasn’t a farm girl but quickly learned how to care for 45 bucket calves. They farmed there until Harry’s wife died, then moved to Iowa. He worked until he was 81 as a night watchman for Spee-Dee Delivery Services before moving to Napoleon.

Keutzer’s farming practices and lifestyle evolved as times and technology changed. He keeps current with technology by following farm auctions and news online.

Just as he learned to incorporate new farming methods throughout his life, he has learned to adjust as a farming nonagenarian.

AgrAbility gives him the resources to continue doing what he loves to do-provide food to feed America.

National Institute of Food and Agriculture, an agency of USDA, administers the AgrAbility Project.

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Brighten up your home – Waterbury Republican American

Gorgeous Bull Skull by Aureus Arts

CHICAGO TRIBUNENo need to break out the crayons. Beat the winter grays with bright stuff for your home. Here are some products to get you started.

1. Scottish designer Jonathan Saunders’ cheeky designs make clashing colors harmonious. His Herringbone carpet for The Rug Company is a case in point. $129 per square foot at The Rug Company, Chicago.

2. Primary colors and simple organic shapes mark the chairs from the Swedish design trio Claesson Koivisto Rune for Tacchini. The Kelly E Chair is $2,300, at Orange Skin, Chicago.

3. The Lindona Necklace from Songa Designs, an eco-friendly accessories line made by women in Rwanda as a way to establish their economic independence. Each handmade piece is made of repurposed natural materials such as banana leaf fiber, sisal plant, and cow horn. $48 at songadesigns. com.

4. Improve your mood by upholstering Vitra’s Mariposa sofa in a bold hue. Pick from dozens of colors including poppy red, grass green, magenta and lemon, pictured. $7,520 at hivemodern.com.

5. Four shades in different hues give the Tam Tam suspension lamp by Design Fabien Dumas a colorful personality. $1,093 at hivemodern.com.

6. Give time the attention it deserves with a clock that steals the proverbial show. Normann Copenhagen’s Watch Me Wall Clock is $50 at normann-copenhagen.com

7. Studio Job’s paper lamp for Moooi is inspired by classic lamps but draws on a crafty material. $1,703.00 at moooi.com.

8. Warm up any seat in the room with Maharam’s Millerstripe Pillow with fabric designed by famed 20th-century industrial designer Alexander Girard. The 17-inch pillow is 92 percent wool and 8 percent nylon and sports a cotton insert with a duck feather fill. $175 at maharam.com.

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Duchess of Rutland spent £1MILLION renovating six-bedroom cottage in grounds of Belvoir Castle – Daily Mail

Duchess of Rutland spent £1MILLION renovating a stylish six-bedroom cottage in the grounds of Belvoir Castle – and it’s now yours to rent for £1,155-a-night

  • The stunning Croxton Park House is set in secluded and picturesque valley in the heart of rural Leicestershire
  • Underwent £1m renovation by Emma Manners, Duchess of Rutland and is listed on holiday lettings site Airbnb
  • Six bedroom home with three bathrooms can host up to 12 guests and costs £850 a night plus additional fees
  • Duchess says she has ‘worked tirelessly’ to create ‘a beautiful cottage in reflection of my home Belvoir Castle’

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As far as Airbnb’s go, it’s hard to top this unique home-stay in terms of history and grandeur.

The Duchess of Rutland has recently listed a cottage in grounds of Belvoir Castle on the site, following a £1million refurbishment – and she has decorated it in the style of her own luxurious home. 

Croxton Park House is located four miles from the castle within Croxton Park, a country estate near Grantham, set in a secluded, picturesque valley in the heart of rural Leicestershire.

It was originally founded as an abbey in the early 12th century before becoming the playground for the early Dukes of Rutland for country pursuits like hunting, shooting, fishing and falconry.

Croxton Park House (pictured) is located four miles from the castle within Croxton Park, a country estate near Grantham, set in a secluded, picturesque valley in the heart of rural Leicestershire

Croxton Park House (pictured) is located four miles from the castle within Croxton Park, a country estate near Grantham, set in a secluded, picturesque valley in the heart of rural Leicestershire

Croxton Park House (pictured) is located four miles from the castle within Croxton Park, a country estate near Grantham, set in a secluded, picturesque valley in the heart of rural Leicestershire

The historical home was originally founded as an abbey in the early 12th century before becoming the playground for the early Dukes of Rutland for country pursuits like hunting, shooting, fishing and falconry. Pictured: the living room

The historical home was originally founded as an abbey in the early 12th century before becoming the playground for the early Dukes of Rutland for country pursuits like hunting, shooting, fishing and falconry. Pictured: the living room

The historical home was originally founded as an abbey in the early 12th century before becoming the playground for the early Dukes of Rutland for country pursuits like hunting, shooting, fishing and falconry. Pictured: the living room

One of the master bedrooms in the cottage, decorated with elaborate wallpaper between the original wooden beams and luxurious animal skin rugs

One of the master bedrooms in the cottage, decorated with elaborate wallpaper between the original wooden beams and luxurious animal skin rugs

One of the master bedrooms in the cottage, decorated with elaborate wallpaper between the original wooden beams and luxurious animal skin rugs

It’s now available for private hire, accommodating 12 guests in six stunning bedrooms with interiors chosen by Emma Manners – the 11th and current Duchess of Rutland – herself.

Writing on the listing on Airbnb, the duchess reveals she has ‘worked tirelessly’ to create ‘a beautiful cottage in reflection of my home Belvoir Castle’. 

She adds: ‘I do hope you love my home away from home as much as I do!’

The residence costs £850 a night, plus a £150 cleaning fee and a £155 service fee, making it £1,155 in total.

The Duchess of Rutland, pictured at Royal Ascot in June, has recently listed the cottage in grounds of Belvoir Castle following a £1million refurbishment on Airbnb - which she has decorated in the style of her own luxurious home

The Duchess of Rutland, pictured at Royal Ascot in June, has recently listed the cottage in grounds of Belvoir Castle following a £1million refurbishment on Airbnb - which she has decorated in the style of her own luxurious home

The Duchess of Rutland, pictured at Royal Ascot in June, has recently listed the cottage in grounds of Belvoir Castle following a £1million refurbishment on Airbnb – which she has decorated in the style of her own luxurious home

Writing on Airbnb, the Duchess of Rutland said she hopes guests love her 'home away from home' as much as she does

Writing on Airbnb, the Duchess of Rutland said she hopes guests love her 'home away from home' as much as she does

Writing on Airbnb, the Duchess of Rutland said she hopes guests love her ‘home away from home’ as much as she does

The residence costs £850 a night, plus a £150 cleaning fee and a £155 service fee, making it £1,155 in total. Pictured: the hallway

The residence costs £850 a night, plus a £150 cleaning fee and a £155 service fee, making it £1,155 in total. Pictured: the hallway

The residence costs £850 a night, plus a £150 cleaning fee and a £155 service fee, making it £1,155 in total. Pictured: the hallway

Pictured: one of the bathrooms in Croxton Park House, which features stylish wall paper and a cowskin rug to take away the chill of the tiled floor

Pictured: one of the bathrooms in Croxton Park House, which features stylish wall paper and a cowskin rug to take away the chill of the tiled floor

Pictured: one of the bathrooms in Croxton Park House, which features stylish wall paper and a cowskin rug to take away the chill of the tiled floor

The hallway of the cottage pays homage to its historic heritage

The hallway of the cottage pays homage to its historic heritage

The twin bedroom is country cottage chic, with elegant floral wallpaper

The twin bedroom is country cottage chic, with elegant floral wallpaper

The hallway of the cottage (right) pays homage to its heritage, while the twin bedroom (left) is country cottage chic, with elegant floral wallpaper

The home has all the modern cons, including four TVs, wifi and 'essentials' - listed as towels, bed sheets, soap and toilet paper, as well as a selection of books and games

The home has all the modern cons, including four TVs, wifi and 'essentials' - listed as towels, bed sheets, soap and toilet paper, as well as a selection of books and games

The home has all the modern cons, including four TVs, wifi and ‘essentials’ – listed as towels, bed sheets, soap and toilet paper, as well as a selection of books and games

The cottage boasts an authentic indoor fireplace in one of the two living rooms, as well as a fully kitted out kitchen with a fridge-freezer with ice dispenser, four TVs, wifi and ‘essentials’ including towels, bed sheets, soap and toilet paper, as well as a selection of books and games.

The host – the Duchess of Rutland – offers a 20 discount if guests stay for an entire week and 25 per cent off if you rent it for a month. As yet it’s received no reviews, having only opened its doors last month. 

Belvoir Castle has formed the backdrop for scenes in season two of Netflix hit The Crown, the film Young Victoria in 2007 and even The Da Vinci Code.

The Cardiff-born duchess, 56, lives in the stately home alongside her estranged husband David Manners, 60, 11th Duke of Rutland and descendant of the Manners dynasty, who succeeded his father the 10th Duke of Rutland in the titles on 4 January 1999, with his fortune estimated at £125m. 

The bathrooms have all been refurbished, including this one which comes complete with a freestanding bath and vanity unit

The bathrooms have all been refurbished, including this one which comes complete with a freestanding bath and vanity unit

The bathrooms have all been refurbished, including this one which comes complete with a freestanding bath and vanity unit

One of the stylish bedrooms which features a window looking out over the expansive lush grounds of Croxton Park, a country estate near Grantham

One of the stylish bedrooms which features a window looking out over the expansive lush grounds of Croxton Park, a country estate near Grantham

One of the stylish bedrooms which features a window looking out over the expansive lush grounds of Croxton Park, a country estate near Grantham

The staircase in the cottage

The staircase in the cottage

The 'laptop friendly work space'

The 'laptop friendly work space'

The cottage, which has been decorated by the Duchess of Rutland, features a carpeted staircase and a ‘laptop friendly’ work space for guests

The home comes complete with a fully kitted out kitchen with a fridge-freezer with ice dispenser, a microwave and a dishwasher and washing machine

The home comes complete with a fully kitted out kitchen with a fridge-freezer with ice dispenser, a microwave and a dishwasher and washing machine

The home comes complete with a fully kitted out kitchen with a fridge-freezer with ice dispenser, a microwave and a dishwasher and washing machine

Their five children – Lady Violet Manners, 26, Lady Alice, 24, and Lady Eliza, 22, and their younger brothers, Charles, Marquess of Granby, 20, and Lord Hugo Manners, 16 – grew up in neo-Gothic splendour in the Leicestershire stately pile. 

The theme of the castle is classic opulence dating back to the 1700s when it was first restored, with the bedrooms boasting four poster beds, gold gilded portraits, rich tapestries, fur rugs and fireplaces.

Sparking no expense, the drawing room boasts silk wallpaper, luxurious furnishings and artwork dating back centuries.

Pictures posted by Emma show a true Downton Abbey inspired life, with maids hovering in the background as the family celebrate birthdays and special occasions – decked out in their finest gowns, singing along to songs played on the piano. 

The cottage boasts an authentic indoor fireplace in one of the two grand living rooms, as well as central heating to keep guests warm and toasty

The cottage boasts an authentic indoor fireplace in one of the two grand living rooms, as well as central heating to keep guests warm and toasty

The cottage boasts an authentic indoor fireplace in one of the two grand living rooms, as well as central heating to keep guests warm and toasty

The kitchen features a unit with mugs, jars of tea and coffee and small elegant glassware including Champagne flutes

The kitchen features a unit with mugs, jars of tea and coffee and small elegant glassware including Champagne flutes

The kitchen features a unit with mugs, jars of tea and coffee and small elegant glassware including Champagne flutes

One of the smaller bedrooms is decorated in a similar theme to the larger suite, with bold wallpaper and beams stripped back to the original wood

One of the smaller bedrooms is decorated in a similar theme to the larger suite, with bold wallpaper and beams stripped back to the original wood

One of the smaller bedrooms is decorated in a similar theme to the larger suite, with bold wallpaper and beams stripped back to the original wood

The cottage itself has a generous courtyard style garden outside, perfect for basking in the sunshine and taking in the stunning surrounding views in summer

The cottage itself has a generous courtyard style garden outside, perfect for basking in the sunshine and taking in the stunning surrounding views in summer

The cottage itself has a generous courtyard style garden outside, perfect for basking in the sunshine and taking in the stunning surrounding views in summer

And the opulent interiors don’t stop there, with bathrooms boasting marble tops, dressing tables, intricate wallpaper and the modern touch of his and hers sinks.

Meanwhile, dinner parties are fit for a king, taking place at tables stretching across a whole hall, surrounded by fireplaces, candelabras and giant portraits of ancestors.

A grand library, complete with oriental carpets, chaise lounges and chandeliers is described in one post by Emma as her ‘favourite afternoon spot’. 

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Cow visits garment store in Kadapa every day, owner feels it has boosted sales – Gulf News

stray cattle cow generic

For illustrative purposes only.
Image Credit: Pixabay

Kadapa: In an amusing incident, a garment shop in Mydukur town of Kadapa district here has been receiving a special guest every day for the past six months.

Interestingly, a cow has made it a habit to daily visit ‘Sri Sairam cloth showroom’ here, rest under the fan for about two to three hours and be on its way.

According to the shop owner P Obaiah, the cow barged into the shop one day in the summers and rested for about two to three hours before leaving.

“At first we were bewildered with the cow entering our shop. We tried to send it away but the animal did not budge. The cow took shelter for a few hours and later it left on its own,” Obaiah said.

Since then, the cow has made it a habit to come into the shop every day.

“The animal has made it a daily practice to come to our shop now. At first, we thought that it will affect our business. But the sales have actually increased. Interestingly, the cow has never spoiled the shop premises,” the shop owner said.

Obaiah’s wife, on the other hand, considers the cow visiting the shop a good omen and has started offering puja to the cow.

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We're very close to disrupting the cow – Fast Company

We’re very close to disrupting the cow

By 2030, these scientists estimate the number of cows in the U.S. will have fallen by 50% and the beef and dairy industries will have collapsed as animal-derived foods are replaced by modern equivalents.

We’re very close to disrupting the cow
[Source Images: GlobalP/iStock, Mai Vu/iStock]

An unstoppable trifecta of fast-improving technology, new business models, and fast-falling costs is creating the deepest, most consequential disruption of food and agriculture in ten thousand years. We face the end of the cattle industry as we know it, and the exponential market growth of inexpensive, high-quality, tasty modern food designed using food-as-software technology based on precise consumer specifications.

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If the U.S. embraces these cheaper and more nutritional modern foods, it can seize a fat slice of an industry that is poised to create 1 million jobs and grow to $1 trillion annually by 2035. If it resists, it risks locking in expensive and obsolete assets, technologies, and skill sets while other countries capture the jobs and wealth that come with building a world-leading industry.

The key to understanding the speed and scale of this disruption is recognizing what happens when the most essential contents of a product are replaced quickly and cheaply. A bottle of milk contains only 3.3% protein. Replace that and there goes the need for a dairy cow. Those proteins—casein and whey—are already being produced in Silicon Valley. We expect these proteins to reach cost parity with animal proteins around 2023 to 2025.

This is not just one disruption: It’s death by a thousand cuts. In our new report, “Rethinking Food and Agriculture 2020-2030,” we analyze the way many different products derived from the cow—from burgers and milk to leather and collagen—will be completely disrupted separately and concurrently by new technologies and business models, which overlap, reinforce, and accelerate each other.

By 2030, we estimate the number of cows in the U.S. will have fallen by 50% and the beef and dairy industries will have collapsed as animal-derived foods are replaced by modern equivalents that are superior and cost less than half as much to produce. All other livestock industries will suffer a similar fate, while businesses throughout the supply chain, from processing plants and renderers to crop farmers and tractor manufacturers, will be hit hard.

This is a protein disruption driven by economics. We can now program microorganisms to produce almost any protein we want because of huge advances in precision biology (the convergence of biology and information technologies) and a process we call precision fermentation (PF). Today, 90% of American-made cheese uses PF proteins. (This is not genetic modification of foods. Proteins have no genetic material so they can’t be genetically modified.) The cost of PF is falling exponentially, from $1 million per kilogram in 2000 to about $100 today. Assuming existing technologies, we project these costs will fall to $10 per kilogram by 2023 to 25. PF proteins will be five times cheaper than animal proteins by 2030 and 10 times cheaper by 2035.

[Source Images: CreativeNature_nl/iStock, Mai Vu/iStock]

Mainstream analysts fail to foresee the speed, scale, and impact of disruption because their models do not account for the complex, systemic, and dynamic way disruptions unfold.  This is not a simple, one-for-one substitution of Impossible Burger for cow burgers. As protein after protein derived from animals is replaced by less-expensive, higher-quality PF alternatives, it becomes more expensive to produce those animal products in the face of decreasing demand, triggering a death spiral of increasing prices and reversing economies of scale.

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While this disruption is inevitable, decision-makers can affect how fast it happens, how widely it spreads, and who benefits. Will this be a market designed to promote openness, transparency, and competition? Or will it be more like the pharmaceutical industry, dominated by a few monopolies with the power to pervert the benefits? Countries that choose the former model will outcompete those that choose the latter.

The benefits of modern foods are profound.  The average U.S. family will save more than $1,200 a year, keeping an additional $100 billion a year in Americans’ pockets by 2030. Far healthier than industrial animal meat, modern foods will help to reduce heart disease, obesity, cancer, and diabetes, which are estimated to cost Americans $1.7 trillion annually. Removing animals from food production will reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by 65% by 2035. It will also free up a landmass as large as the Louisiana Purchase.

The business opportunities are enormous. Everyone needs to eat. Modern food offers the promise of high-quality, nutritious, inexpensive food—and the opportunity to build a multi-trillion-dollar industry that will soon feed the world. This disruption has already started. The time to lead is now.


Tony Seba, an award-winning, best-selling author and Silicon Valley entrepreneur and angel investor, is cofounder of RethinkX, an independent think tank that analyzes and forecasts the scope, speed, and scale of technology-driven disruption and its implications across society.

Catherine Tubb is an expert on the agriculture, pesticide, and fertilizer industries. She coauthored with Seba “Rethinking Food and Agriculture 2020-2030—The Second Domestication of Plants and Animals, the Disruption of the Cow, and the Collapse of Industrial Livestock Farming,” the second in a series of RethinkX reports on technology disruption and its implications for society.

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