MU Extension project helps 93-year-old farmer – Houston Herald

Farmers like 93-year-old Harry Keutzer don’t quit just because their body parts slow down.

His hens, cows and pets depend on him. So do customers at the Kansas City-area farmers markets where he sells produce, eggs and hand-loomed rugs.

The Missouri AgrAbility Project, through University of Missouri Extension, Lincoln University Cooperative Extension and the Brain Injury Association of Missouri, provides aging farmers with information, referrals and a variety of resources to keep working.

Lincoln University Extension farm and AgrAbility outreach worker Susan Jaster carried out an assessment of accessibility at Keutzer’s Lafayette County farm and made recommendations on how to make the home safer and more accessible.

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Harry Keutzer

HARRY KEUTZER

MU Extension state health and safety specialist Karen Funkenbusch said AgrAbility helps farmers with disabilities caused by age, injury or illness to keep farming. The program provides research-based information and appropriate referrals to other agencies as needed.

America’s farm population has been aging rapidly over the last 30 years. According to the USDA’s 2012 Census of Agriculture, released in 2014, the average age of U.S. farmers is 58.3 years. There are now more farmers over 75 than between the ages of 35 and 44, Funkenbusch said.

Keutzer and his daughter-in-law, Stacy, grew 3,000 tomato plants in a high tunnel last year. They also planted a three-acre garden and put in a large plot of potatoes on a neighbor’s garden spot. Stacy picks all of the produce and Harry sorts it. Both wash and pack it.

Mobility is a challenge. When it rains, Keutzer has to stay inside and can’t work. But Keutzer’s energy level and stamina during the three-hour farm assessment surprised Jaster.

“He has the energy and deserves to be able to carry on his active life,” she said.

AgrAbility recommended a different type of scooter to reduce fatigue and help him maneuver around the farm over muddy and rough ground. The program also recommended a hydraulic lift to move pallets from the ground to make it easier to load produce onto the enclosed truck the Keutzers take to farmers markets.

Harry’s weathered hands are rarely idle and his mind remains active with farmer ingenuity. He finds it increasingly difficult to plant, so he and his son, Virgil, built a transplanter for their small tractor. It plants and waters the plant plug and lays weed-barrier plastic.

He uses his scooter to check on 100 chickens and takes buckets of water to livestock. He milks a three-teated cow that provides milk for two calves and a gallon a day for milk, butter, homemade ice cream and tapioca for the Keutzers.

He still enjoys cutting wood. He makes wine and helps his daughter-in-law cut fabric strips to make into loomed rugs. In October, he assisted a calving cow with a difficult birth.

Keutzer grew up working with his brothers on his father’s 500-acre farm at Creighton, Mo. He was so small when he started milking cows that his father had a special milking stool made for him.

He went to a country school until eighth grade. He said boys carried .22-caliber single-shot rifles to school, shooting rabbits and squirrels along the way to feed their families. And all boys had a two-bladed pocketknife, he says, to skin wild game and play “mumblepeg” at recess.

After school each day, he listened to 15 minutes of the Tom Mix cowboy show on the radio before starting chores. The radio wasn’t turned on again until 9:30 p.m., when the family listened to “Amos ’n’ Andy” and the news.

He farmed with a team of horses before buying his first tractor, a Farmall F-20. In 1942, Harry bought his second tractor, an Allis-Chalmers WC, at auction for $870.

He and other farmers anxiously awaited electrification through REA. On Jan. 7, 1945, he and his wife, Johnnie, celebrated her birthday in nearby Clinton. They returned home to a house lit with electricity, and their new Montgomery Ward refrigerator was plugged in and running.

He, his wife and a hired hand traveled the area baling hay from spring to fall. His wife drove the tractor as he put the 8 ½-foot wires into the baler. The hired hand tied the bales. It was hard work, but Keutzer and his wife made enough money to buy a new Kaiser automobile with cash.

In 1952, the Keutzers moved to southern Minnesota, where his uncles lived. He rented 320 acres on shares and was one of the first to plant soybean. Corn was selling for $1.25 a bushel under a government price-protection system.

Times were different then, Harry recalls. Farm implement dealers and oil companies helped young farmers get started by extending credit until crops were sold. He bought a four-row cultivator, planter, disk, a new corn picker and two new tractors – a John Deere 720 diesel and an IH Farmall 400 – on credit.

He and Johnnie also opened their home to 50 foster children during their time in Minnesota. The dinner table was often set for more than 20. He taught the children the value of rural life, hard work and being self-sufficient.

In 1959, his father quit farming and he returned to Missouri. Harry rented the farm next to his father’s and had 1,000 acres of South Grand River bottomland.

They farmed the home place until 1972, when Truman Reservoir took much of their land. They sold out and returned to Minnesota to a 45-head dairy farm.

His son met Stacy and married. She wasn’t a farm girl but quickly learned how to care for 45 bucket calves. They farmed there until Harry’s wife died, then moved to Iowa. He worked until he was 81 as a night watchman for Spee-Dee Delivery Services before moving to Napoleon.

Keutzer’s farming practices and lifestyle evolved as times and technology changed. He keeps current with technology by following farm auctions and news online.

Just as he learned to incorporate new farming methods throughout his life, he has learned to adjust as a farming nonagenarian.

AgrAbility gives him the resources to continue doing what he loves to do-provide food to feed America.

National Institute of Food and Agriculture, an agency of USDA, administers the AgrAbility Project.

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Brighten up your home – Waterbury Republican American

Gorgeous Bull Skull by Aureus Arts

CHICAGO TRIBUNENo need to break out the crayons. Beat the winter grays with bright stuff for your home. Here are some products to get you started.

1. Scottish designer Jonathan Saunders’ cheeky designs make clashing colors harmonious. His Herringbone carpet for The Rug Company is a case in point. $129 per square foot at The Rug Company, Chicago.

2. Primary colors and simple organic shapes mark the chairs from the Swedish design trio Claesson Koivisto Rune for Tacchini. The Kelly E Chair is $2,300, at Orange Skin, Chicago.

3. The Lindona Necklace from Songa Designs, an eco-friendly accessories line made by women in Rwanda as a way to establish their economic independence. Each handmade piece is made of repurposed natural materials such as banana leaf fiber, sisal plant, and cow horn. $48 at songadesigns. com.

4. Improve your mood by upholstering Vitra’s Mariposa sofa in a bold hue. Pick from dozens of colors including poppy red, grass green, magenta and lemon, pictured. $7,520 at hivemodern.com.

5. Four shades in different hues give the Tam Tam suspension lamp by Design Fabien Dumas a colorful personality. $1,093 at hivemodern.com.

6. Give time the attention it deserves with a clock that steals the proverbial show. Normann Copenhagen’s Watch Me Wall Clock is $50 at normann-copenhagen.com

7. Studio Job’s paper lamp for Moooi is inspired by classic lamps but draws on a crafty material. $1,703.00 at moooi.com.

8. Warm up any seat in the room with Maharam’s Millerstripe Pillow with fabric designed by famed 20th-century industrial designer Alexander Girard. The 17-inch pillow is 92 percent wool and 8 percent nylon and sports a cotton insert with a duck feather fill. $175 at maharam.com.

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Moo-ving in? Cows graze Jacksonville homeowners’ yards – WJXT News4JAX

Breaking ‘moos’…

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – This is udderly ridiculous.

Cattle took over a Northside subdivision near First Coast High School on Wednesday. They were spotted mingling in the North Creek Subdivision.

Yes, we will milk this story for all it’s worth. Maybe they’ve got beef with the homeowners? Not quite.

We spoke with a man who said the cows came from Oak Creek Ranch, located on Webb Road. They were being moved from one field to another when they decided to wander off and explore “MOOOVAL.”

Neighbors were, as expected, taken by surprise.

“My dog was going crazy at the door,” said Ken Watson. “I walked out and saw all the cows walking by and grazing. It was just wild.”

Last night, Janice Ross-Sanders said she noticed a cow in her backyard. She called police.

“When the police officer pulled up last night, I told him his vehicle was too small to handle the package we had for it,” Ross-Sanders said.

Bryce Daniel, who works at the ranch, said the cows were safely returned to the ranch after their brief escape.


About the Authors:

Author Photo
Carianne Luter

Carianne Luter is a social media producer for News4Jax and has worked at Channel 4 since December 2015. She graduated from the University of North Florida with a degree in communications.

Author Photo
Vic Micolucci

Lifetime Jacksonville resident anchors the 9 a.m. weekday newscast and is part of the News4Jax I-Team.

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Brazil Says It Has U.S. Approval To Resume Beef Imports – Drovers Magazine

[unable to retrieve full-text content]

  1. Brazil Says It Has U.S. Approval To Resume Beef Imports  Drovers Magazine
  2. US lifts Brazilian beef import ban amid quality concerns  KCCI Des Moines
  3. US lifts ban on Brazilian beef | 2020-02-21  Agri-Pulse
  4. U.S. Lifts Ban on Brazil Beef Imports After More Than Two Years  Bloomberg
  5. U.S. will allow fresh Brazilian beef imports  Successful Farming
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News

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The ‘sacred cow’ of Boston’s education landscape – The Boston Globe

The panel met about a half dozen times in 2016. But when Mayor Martin J. Walsh learned of its existence through a Boston Globe article in July 2016, he immediately ended it, saying the district should focus instead on giving students of color access to more rigorous coursework.

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“The mayor said this whole thing was being shut down,” said Matt Cregor, a civil rights attorney on the panel. “He was already running for reelection and this clearly did not align with his priorities.”

Walsh’s spokeswoman challenged that assessment, saying the mayor was concerned the process lacked “critical engagement with the community.”

The committee never met again.

Call it Boston’s untouchable issue. For 20 years, every effort — and there have been many — to even tweak the admissions process for Boston Latin School and the other exam schools has been swiftly quashed.

The current process, which judges applicants half on grades and half on test scores, has worked well for many private school families, whose children win spots at Boston Latin School at much higher rates than public school students. And it’s worked for families who can afford to hire tutors for the test. Yet it hasn’t worked for hundreds of Black and Latino students, whose numbers at BLS plummeted after a federal court decreed in 1998 that Boston’s use of race in exam school admissions was unconstitutional.

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But for the first time in two decades, change — at least to the admissions test — is likely afoot. And some say it’s time to rethink the admissions formula in a much bigger way — with an eye toward restoring diversity at Boston Latin, in particular. Black enrollment at the school hovers around 8 percent, and Hispanic enrollment, 13 percent. By contrast, Black students number 30 percent of the public school system, and Hispanic students, 42 percent. Meanwhile, Asian students are significantly overrepresented at Boston Latin.

During a public spat earlier this month between Boston and its test vendor, both sides announced they would likely cease working together. The district last week released a request for proposals to replace the test, the Independent School Entrance Exam, before the next test in November for the city’s three exam schools — Latin School, Boston Latin Academy, and the John D. O’Bryant School of Mathematics and Science. The ISEE is not aligned with state standards and it tests for topics — like some algebra skills — that most Boston public school students taking the test haven’t yet been taught.

“The fact that Boston Latin School has such disproportionate racial representation as compared to the city’s population tells you the problem,” said Lori Smith Britton, a 1988 graduate whose daughter graduated from the school in 2018. “The problem is not that Black and Latino kids lack capacity to do the work. It’s about a test and an admissions process that lacks equity.”

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The NAACP and Lawyers for Civil Rights are calling on the district not only to immediately cease reliance on the ISEE, including for admissions offers going out this spring, but to consider a more substantial overhaul of the process. Tanisha Sullivan, the local NAACP’s president, said that based on a series of recent forums, the group recommended possibilities such as granting admissions to the top students from every Boston elementary school (the exam schools start in seventh grade) or designing a system that would ensure more equal representation across Boston’s ZIP codes.

A revamped process would provide more “equitable access for Black, Latinx, and low-income students into our exam schools,” Sullivan said.

A few other cities have experimented in recent years with creative ways to ensure more diversity at their academically selective schools. In Chicago, for instance, the city school system, like Boston’s, weighs applicant test scores and grades. But it also takes socioeconomics into account — considering such factors as median family income and the percentage of non-English speakers in a student’s home neighborhood.

Boston Superintendent Brenda Cassellius acknowledged in a recent interview that the student population at Boston’s exam schools should become “more representative of the district.” But she said that a broader reconsideration of the admissions formula is off the table, at least for now. “I am not looking at a new formula,” she said, adding that she prefers to assess the impact of a new test — and avoid “wholesale change.”

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***

Political history has not looked kindly on those who support major change to the exam school admission process — particularly change that would significantly decrease white, middle-class, or private school representation at Latin School. (Last year, one-third of students “invited” to attend Latin were from private schools, although only about 11 percent of Boston’s school-age children attend these schools.)

The oldest public school in America — with alumni including Declaration of Independence signer Samuel Adams and conductor Leonard Bernstein — Boston Latin boasts an endowment of more than $59 million through its alumni association. Ninety-five percent of BLS graduates attend four-year colleges, compared to 48 percent of students districtwide.

Then-superintendant candidate Thomas Payzant at his home in 1995.
Then-superintendant candidate Thomas Payzant at his home in 1995.KIM, YUNGHI GLOBE STAFF PHOTO

When the exam school admissions formula was up for debate more than two decades ago in the wake of the federal court ruling, then-superintendent Thomas Payzant weighed nine alternatives — everything from a partial lottery system to considering family income in admissions decisions. (Payzant eventually, in 1999,recommended to the School Committee to rank applicants based on test scores and grades.)

Michael Contompasis, the district’s chief operating officer at the time and a longtime Latin School headmaster, said he urged city officials to consider giving public school students an advantage over children applying from private and parochial schools. “My head was pretty much served to me in a platter,” Contompasis said in a recent interview.

Boston was not ready for such a drastic change, said Jerry Burrell, the district’s former director of enrollment, who was involved in those discussions. It was clear “the idea was shot down for political reasons,” Burrell said.

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About 10 years later, then-superintendent Carol Johnson instructed the district’s director of data and accountability, Kamal Chavda, to investigate ways to revamp the admissions process, according to a recent interview with Chavda.

Then-superintendent Carol R. Johnson at a meeting in 2011.
Then-superintendent Carol R. Johnson at a meeting in 2011.Matthew J. Lee/Globe Staff

At the time, Johnson’s team studied the grades submitted by students from Catholic schools applying to the exam schools and determined there was “probably” grade inflation, according to Burrell. Concerned that could give parochial students an unfair advantage, Johnson’s administration considered alternatives that included basing admissions solely on test scores, or factoring in teacher recommendations.

None of it went anywhere.

Longtime observers and former leaders of Boston’s public schools say there’s a reason. Change would have enraged some powerful and politically connected voting constituencies, including private school parents and exam school alumni.

“Elected officials and city councilors respond to parent groups that are perceived as having greater power, such as parents in West Roxbury,” said the Rev. Gregory Groover, who served on the School Committee between 2007 and 2014, including a stint as chairman.

West Roxbury, which is 73 percent white, has the highest percentage of students at Boston Latin of any city neighborhood. In 2019, nearly 20 percent of Boston Latin students were from West Roxbury, compared to 3 percent from Roxbury and 0.7 percent from Mattapan, both predominantly Black neighborhoods. About 4 percent of the school’s students were from East Boston, a predominantly Latino neighborhood.

Some Latin School parents have long resisted any change to the admissions process because it could dilute the perceived “academic quality” of the school, said Susan Naimark, a School Committee member from 1997 to 2005, whose two children graduated from the school nearly two decades ago. “They want their kids to be among the top performers,” said Naimark.

Lew Finfer, codirector of the Massachusetts Communities Action Network, lobbied four different superintendents to change the exam school admissions policy. He puts it bluntly: “Boston Latin is a sacred cow.”

But that didn’t stop Chang from wading into the issue about four years ago and encouraging the advisory committee to figure out how to increase Black and Latino representation at the exam schools.

Chang was particularly interested in how to increase racial diversity while abiding by the court decree that race cannot be used as an explicit factor in admissions decisions, said Cregor, the attorney on the committee.

After Walsh killed the committee, the relationship between him and Chang grew increasingly strained. “What I learned was that [making] a change at [Latin School] was not something I was going to be able to do,” Chang said in a recent interview. When Chang resigned in 2018, Walsh issued a public statement expressing his displeasure with the school chief’s record.

Then-superintendent Tommy Chang in 2016.
Then-superintendent Tommy Chang in 2016.Pat Greenhouse

Given the pushback superintendents have faced for trying to shake up the exam school admissions process, Cassellius might be politically shrewd for taking a slow approach, said Naimark.

“Any superintendent is going to have trouble tackling Boston Latin,” she said. “You have to pick your battles.”

***

Cities across the country have grappled in recent decades with how to balance diversity with high standards at their academically selective public schools. “Everybody that has an exam school has to come up with a rationing system,’’ said Chester E. Finn Jr., coauthor of “Exam Schools: Inside America’s Most Selective Public High Schools.” With fewer than 200 such schools nationwide, he said, many concentrated in large cities, the demand far exceeds the number of classroom seats. “There is no ‘right’ way to do” the rationing,” Finn said.

New York City has for decades relied solely on applicants’ scores on a single exam, the Specialized High School Admissions Test. That has resulted in elite schools that are even less diverse than Boston’s: Last year, just seven of the nearly 900 students offered admission at New York’s most selective high school were Black.

Much like in Boston, however, changing New York’s status quo is politically thorny. In 2018, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio proposed basing admissions on students’ middle school class rank and their scores on state standardized tests. “It became very controversial very quickly,” said David Bloomfield, an education professor at Brooklyn College and the CUNY Graduate Center. “And he’s backed down from the conflict.”

Change for the most elite schools in New York would also require action by the state Legislature, which created the current system decades ago “as a political bow to constituents who worry about minorities taking over the crown jewel of the school system,” Bloomfield said. “It was a fortress mentality to protect academic privilege.”

Alternatives to the rank-order metrics used in Boston and New York have pros and cons. Finn, president emeritus at the Fordham Institute, argues for what he calls a “holistic approach” to exam school admissions that includes essays, interviews, and teacher recommendations, something more akin to most selective colleges’ admissions practices.

But Cassellius, Boston’s superintendent, countered that “interviews are more subjective” than data points such as test scores and grade point averages.

Boston Public Schools superintendent Brenda Cassellius.
Boston Public Schools superintendent Brenda Cassellius.Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff

Chicago has done better than many cities with exam school diversity. “Only in Chicago are the [selective high schools] close to being representative of the city as a whole, in terms of both race and economic disadvantage,” the Brookings Institution said in a 2019 study, which examined eight cities, including Boston.

Similar to Boston, each applicant gets a score based on a combination of test scores and grades. But in Chicago, the city’s census tracts are also divided into four tiers based on a combination of income, adult education attainment, percent of owner-occupied homes, and other indicators. Thirty percent of the seats at selective high schools go to the students with the top scores, regardless of where they live. But the remaining seats are divided evenly among the top scorers from each of the four tiers.

“Chicago is really the exemplar in terms of selective schools using socioeconomic status in admissions decisions,” said Richard Kahlenberg, a senior fellow at The Century Foundation who helped devise the city’s admissions system. The process is not without weaknesses, however. One concern has been that relatively wealthy students from low-income neighborhoods can appear in the admissions process to be much more disadvantaged than they really are.

And, of course, income diversity cannot always be used as a proxy for racial diversity. “We are all hemmed in by the Supreme Court because we can’t name race as a factor” in admissions, said Bloomfield.

***

Instead of upending the admissions process, Cassellius has set two main strategies: First, she wants a new test that better measures “students’ knowledge and skills” than the ISEE. The Educational Records Bureau, which produces the ISEE, won the last three contracts despite failing to show that the test helped predict high school success for Black and Latino students.

Cassellius’ second strategy is to continue shoring up test preparation and access for Boston’s public school students. In 2017, the district expanded access to its two-week summer preparation program, called the Exam School Initiative (which, notably, private school students can also attend). Last summer, 775 students participated, up from 409 in 2014, district data show. That effort hasn’t led to a greater percentage of Black and Latino students enrolled in Boston Latin, however.

And last fall, for the first time, the district moved the test from a Saturday to a school day to provide all students with more easy access.

Walsh supports Cassellius’ approach. In a statement, his spokeswoman said her “work to improve access to Boston’s three exam schools is in stark contrast” to Chang’s because she has consistently sought broad public input. Cassellius “was chosen to lead Boston Public Schools because of her focus on equity and her proven track record of listening to everyone in the community,” the statement read.

But some wonder whether it’s enough.

“As long as you are playing around with standardized tests, people will learn to game the test,” said Bloomfield. “And people who learn how to game the test will sell secret sauce to families willing to pay.”

Kaya Bos, a Harvard University senior and Latin School alum, said she would like to see a new admissions formula — even one that might have prevented her from getting in 10 years ago. When Bos applied, she was studying at a Brookline elementary school through the Metco program, which sends Boston students of color to suburban public schools. She bought a test-prep book and studied on her own. “It felt even more intense than getting into Harvard,” she recalled.

At Boston Latin, Bos realized some students were groomed for the ISEE by their elementary schools while others got little help. “It wasn’t really a fair judgment of how much the kids knew,” she said.

Bos said officials should bite the political bullet, and devise a new system where the top students from each elementary school get admitted, or where Boston Public School applicants have some kind of priority.

“That spot may go to someone who didn’t have the opportunity to go to Brookline High School,” she said. “I think [that] may be fairer than what happened with me.”

Partial funding for this initiative is provided by the Barr Foundation, a Boston-based foundation that has made student success in high school and beyond a top priority. The Globe has complete editorial control over story selection, reporting, and editing.


Bianca Vázquez Toness can be reached at bianca.toness@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter at @biancavtoness. Meghan E. Irons can be reached at meghan.irons@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @meghanirons. Sarah Carr has covered education for the last 20 years, reporting on battles over school vouchers, efforts to educate China’s massive population of migrant children, and the explosion of charter schools in New Orleans.

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Op-ed: Stop Big Game Trophy Hunting – Jamaica Plain Gazette

By Melissa Martin, Ph.D.

“International trophy hunting is a
multinational, multimillion-dollar industry practiced throughout the world.
Trophy hunting is broadly defined as the killing of animals for recreation with
the purpose of collecting trophies such as horns, antlers, skulls, skins,
tusks, or teeth for display. The United States imports the most trophies of any
country in the world.” Read the 26-page report by the Congressional Research
Service (March 20, 2019). www.crsreports.congress.gov.

 American trophy hunters pay big money to kill
animals overseas and import 126,000 wildlife trophies per year. They also do
their sport-killing domestically: Bears, bobcats, mountain lions, wolves and
other domestic wildlife fall victim to trophy hunting, damaging natural
ecosystems. www.humanesociety.org.

 The United States, international trophy
hunting is addressed by several laws, including the Endangered Species Act. ESA
does not regulate trophy-hunting activities within range countries directly;
rather, the law governs what can be imported into the United States. The U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) regulates trophy hunting, in part, by issuing
permits to import trophies of species that are listed as threatened or
endangered under ESA. www.crsreports.congress.gov.

 Excuses. Excuses. Excuses. Trophy hunters
rationalize reasons out the wazoo to justify killing of animals in the wild.
Hunters pump money into the economy. Hunters help with conservationism. Really?
Hunters kill for the thrill. And hang their prize on walls to brag. Decorate
your walls with something else. Is destroying wildlife for pleasure unethical?
Yes.

 “Trophy hunting—the killing of big game for a
set of horns or tusks, a skin, or a taxidermied body—has burgeoned into a
billion-dollar, profit-driven industry, overseen in some cases by corrupt
governments. Many countries in sub-Saharan Africa allow trophy hunting, with
varying degrees of transparency and control, establishing yearly quotas meant
to reflect the status of species and creating exclusions for highly vulnerable
populations. South Africa, for instance, no longer allows hunting of leopards.
Kenya has banned trophy hunting outright since 1977, and in Botswana, a
comparatively wildlife-rich country, a temporary ban in government-controlled
hunting areas went into effect in 2014,” according to an article in National
Geographic.

 Cecil, a famed black-maned lion in Zimbabwe,
was lured with bait, shot with an arrow and suffered for more than 10 hours
before his hunters tracked and finished killing him in 2015. Cecil’s death
sparked international outrage in 2015; his son, Xanda, met a similar fate two years
later. www.humanesociety.org.

 Cecil, the lion, was stalked and killed by a
Minnesota dentist under the guise of conservation. How much did that cost him
for bragging and boasting rights?

 Trophy hunting in places where animals are
bred and held captive for the purpose of being killed (canned hunting) results
in cutting off the head of a creature to decorate a wall. Ah, have a beer and
boast. Oh, have a bratwurst and brag.

 Why do people thrill kill animals? “Why we may
never understand the reasons people hunt animals as ‘trophies’” is an
explanation by criminologist Dr. Xanthe Mallett. “Perhaps hunting large animals
is an example of some people’s need to show dominance over others. Research
shows increased levels of hostility and a need for power and control are
associated with poor attitudes towards animals, among men in particular.”
www.theconversation.com.

 “Of all the animals, man is the only one that
is cruel. He is the only one that inflicts pain for the pleasure of doing
it.—Mark Twain

Writing
this column, I searched around my house to make sure I was not being a
hypocrite. Any items made of ivory? No. Any bearskin rugs on my floor? No. Any
boots or bags made of crocodile skin? No. Any coats made of animal fur? No. Any
pillows made of duck feathers? No. I do own a purse and a pair of boots that
are partly made of cow hide (leather). I’m assuming the leather is a byproduct
of the meat from the cow which feeds humans. While growing up, I ate venison.
Chicken, turkey, and seafood have a place on my table. And on occasion, I eat
bacon. But I’ve never committed an animal thrill kill.

 Melissa Martin, Ph.D., is an author,
columnist, educator, and therapist. She lives in Ohio. Contact her at
[email protected]

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Joaquin Phoenix saves cow and calf from slaughterhouse – The Guardian

[unable to retrieve full-text content]

  1. Joaquin Phoenix saves cow and calf from slaughterhouse  The Guardian
  2. Joaquin Phoenix Rescued a Cow and Her Newborn Calf From an LA Slaughterhouse – Watch  IndieWire
  3. Watch Joaquin Phoenix Rescue A Cow And Her Calf From L.A. Slaughterhouse  Deadline
  4. Joaquin Phoenix, lifelong vegan, saved a cow and her calf from a slaughterhouse  The Week
  5. Watch Joaquin Phoenix Free a Cow From a Slaughterhouse  VICE
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News

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Guest Op-ed: Stop Big Game Trophy Hunting – Lynn Journal

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By Melissa Martin, Ph.D.

“International trophy hunting is a
multinational, multimillion-dollar industry practiced throughout the world.
Trophy hunting is broadly defined as the killing of animals for recreation with
the purpose of collecting trophies such as horns, antlers, skulls, skins,
tusks, or teeth for display. The United States imports the most trophies of any
country in the world.” Read the 26-page report by the Congressional Research
Service (March 20, 2019). www.crsreports.congress.gov.

 American trophy hunters pay big money to kill
animals overseas and import 126,000 wildlife trophies per year. They also do
their sport-killing domestically: Bears, bobcats, mountain lions, wolves and
other domestic wildlife fall victim to trophy hunting, damaging natural
ecosystems. www.humanesociety.org.

<!–/*
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* non-SSL page. If this tag is to be placed on an SSL page, change the
* 'http://sparkwiresolutions.com/revive/www/delivery/…'
* to
* 'https://sparkwiresolutions.com/revive/www/delivery/…'
*
* This noscript section of this tag only shows image banners. There
* is no width or height in these banners, so if you want these tags to
* allocate space for the ad before it shows, you will need to add this
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 The
United States, international trophy hunting is addressed by several laws,
including the Endangered Species Act. ESA does not regulate trophy-hunting
activities within range countries directly; rather, the law governs what can be
imported into the United States. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS)
regulates trophy hunting, in part, by issuing permits to import trophies of
species that are listed as threatened or endangered under ESA.
www.crsreports.congress.gov.

 Excuses. Excuses. Excuses. Trophy hunters
rationalize reasons out the wazoo to justify killing of animals in the wild.
Hunters pump money into the economy. Hunters help with conservationism. Really?
Hunters kill for the thrill. And hang their prize on walls to brag. Decorate
your walls with something else. Is destroying wildlife for pleasure unethical?
Yes.

 “Trophy hunting—the killing of big game for a
set of horns or tusks, a skin, or a taxidermied body—has burgeoned into a
billion-dollar, profit-driven industry, overseen in some cases by corrupt
governments. Many countries in sub-Saharan Africa allow trophy hunting, with
varying degrees of transparency and control, establishing yearly quotas meant
to reflect the status of species and creating exclusions for highly vulnerable
populations. South Africa, for instance, no longer allows hunting of leopards.
Kenya has banned trophy hunting outright since 1977, and in Botswana, a
comparatively wildlife-rich country, a temporary ban in government-controlled
hunting areas went into effect in 2014,” according to an article in National
Geographic.

 Cecil,
a famed black-maned lion in Zimbabwe, was lured with bait, shot with an arrow
and suffered for more than 10 hours before his hunters tracked and finished
killing him in 2015. Cecil’s death sparked international outrage in 2015; his
son, Xanda, met a similar fate two years later. www.humanesociety.org.

 Cecil,
the lion, was stalked and killed by a Minnesota dentist under the guise of
conservation. How much did that cost him for bragging and boasting rights?

 Trophy
hunting in places where animals are bred and held captive for the purpose of
being killed (canned hunting) results in cutting off the head of a creature to
decorate a wall. Ah, have a beer and boast. Oh, have a bratwurst and brag.

 Why do
people thrill kill animals? “Why we may never understand the reasons people
hunt animals as ‘trophies’” is an explanation by criminologist Dr. Xanthe
Mallett. “Perhaps hunting large animals is an example of some people’s need to
show dominance over others. Research shows increased levels of hostility and a
need for power and control are associated with poor attitudes towards animals,
among men in particular.” www.theconversation.com.

 “Of
all the animals, man is the only one that is cruel. He is the only one that
inflicts pain for the pleasure of doing it.”—Mark Twain

Writing this column, I searched around my
house to make sure I was not being a hypocrite. Any items made of ivory? No.
Any bearskin rugs on my floor? No. Any boots or bags made of crocodile skin?
No. Any coats made of animal fur? No. Any pillows made of duck feathers? No. I
do own a purse and a pair of boots that are partly made of cow hide (leather).
I’m assuming the leather is a byproduct of the meat from the cow, which feeds
humans. While growing up, I ate venison. Chicken, turkey, and seafood have a
place on my table. And on occasion, I eat bacon. But I’ve never committed an
animal thrill-kill. Melissa
Martin, Ph.D., is an author, columnist, educator, and therapist. She lives in
Ohio. Contact her at [email protected]

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I'm Me, Not Meat' Billboard to Honor Cow Killed in High School Parking Lot – PETA

PETA Memorial Will Encourage Anyone Upset by Animal’s Violent Death to Go Vegan

For Immediate Release:
February 19, 2020

Contact:
Brooke Rossi 202-483-7382

Roseburg, Ore. – In response to reports that a cow was fatally shot in the Roseburg High School parking lot on February 13 after escaping from a trailer nearby, PETA plans to place a billboard in the area urging anyone appalled by this act of violence to stand up for all cows by going vegan.

“This cow’s desperate bid for freedom is a reminder that animals are individuals who value their lives and don’t deserve to die from a bullet or the slaughterhouse knife,” says PETA Executive Vice President Tracy Reiman. “PETA’s billboard will encourage people to help prevent future suffering by keeping cows and all other animals off their plates.”

In today’s meat industry, sensitive cows are shot in the head with a captive-bolt gun, they’re hung up by one leg, and their throats are cut—often while they’re still conscious and able to feel pain. Cows used for dairy are artificially inseminated (raped by inserting an arm into the rectum and a metal rod into the vagina), and calves are torn away from their loving mothers within a day of birth. Each person who goes vegan saves the lives of nearly 200 cows, pigs, chickens, and other animals every year.

PETA—whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to eat”— opposes speciesism, which is a human-supremacist worldview that fosters violence toward other animals. For more information, please visit PETA.org.

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New device targets harmful cow habit – WBBJ-TV

HERTFORDSHIRE, England — In the ongoing fight against climate change, some farms in England are equipping cattle with a new weapon. The invention targets a harmful habit of cows.

Cattle have been in Fransisco Norris’s life since he was a kid. He comes from a family of farmers and is working to change the livestock industry by reducing climate change, one cow at a time. Norris says “It’s a pressing issue that needs to be dealt with quickly.”

The issue isn’t something you see. It’s something you hear. Climate scientists say cow burps are harmful to the environment because of the large amount of methane gas each one contains. Norris has been studying cow emissions for two years. Norris says, “We are basically monitoring, in real-time, their methane emissions.”

That’s where his company ‘Zelp’ comes in, tackling emissions head-on with a face mask that captures each methane-filled burp then converts it into water and carbon dioxide. According to Norris, it creates cleaner air, but he admits it’s a tough sell at first. “I’m making sure that people understand that this is viable, that this is scalable, and that this is an efficient solution to the problem,” he says.

Scientists say methane emissions are 85 times more damaging to the environment than CO2, and that cow emissions are more harmful than all the cars on the road combined. Norris says, “We face the challenge of moving at the speed that the climate crisis requires.”

Cows also emit methane through their intestines, but experts say their burps are the biggest climate change culprits. And with almost a billion cows around the world belching once every two minutes, their behavior might need a mask and some manners.

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