There’s another really big cow in California – KPLC

“Somebody called me, they’re like, ‘Hey Lindsey, there’s this steer down the road and, you know, he’s hungry, he’s been mooing for days,’” she said. “So I drove over there with some friends, and we had a trailer and two trucks full of people. Once they finally decided, ‘OK, we’re going to relinquish him to you,’ then we got him in about two hours later and drove off. And he’s been with us ever since.”

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Cattle on Feed Numbers: A Look Around the World – Drovers Magazine

Most countries produce beef for non-farm consumers, often using grains and forages to sell high-quality products at a relatively low cost. But having a large commercial feedlot component of the beef sector is mostly still the domain of just a few countries, led by the U.S.

Besides the U.S, Canada, and Australia, no other countries have statistics to give perspective on the role of commercial feedlots. Mexico has an expanding feedlot sector. Some South America countries (e.g., Uruguay, Brazil, and Argentina) have grown, but the feedlot sector is still small relative to the size of their cattle sectors, commercial feedlot capacity. The same applies to Russia and Kazakhstan. New Zealand has a few feedlots (the largest with a capacity of about 20,000 head), usually with Japanese affiliations. Other countries in Europe and elsewhere (e.g., Japan) feed cattle but mostly on a small scale, which is primarily individual farm-based. Let’s take a brief look at the recent numbers for the U.S., Canada, and Australia.

In the U.S., the number of cattle on feed has been on the rise for several years due to cyclical herd expansion. The November 1, 2018, monthly survey of feedlots with 1,000 head or more capacity by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), showed 11.7 million animals on-feed, up 3.2% year-over-year. That was the biggest November 1 count since 2011. As of January 1, 2018, NASS put the number of cattle in all U.S. feedlots at 14.0 million.

CanFax reports monthly the number of animals in Alberta and Saskatchewan feedlots, where most Canadian commercial lots are located. As of November 1, 2018, those two Provinces had 925,900 cattle in feedlots, which was the largest for that date since 2008. Nationally, Statistics Canada reported 1.4 million head in all feedlots as of January 1, 2018. In contrast to the U.S., to provide animals for feedlots, the Canadian beef cowherd has not grown much in recent years. According to Statistics Canada, the beef cowherd has been virtually unchanged since January 1, 2015. This year, drought has been a factor pushing cattle into Canadian feedlots.

Australia has the third largest number of cattle on-feed. According to the quarterly report from Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA), at the end of September this year, there were 1.1 million cattle in feedlots. Year-over-year the increase was 9.9%. The Australian feedlot inventory has been on a steady uptrend since the MLA survey began in 1991. Ten years ago, the inventory was about 733,000 animals. Note that the first time the number exceeded 1 million head was 2017. Currently, more cattle are in feedlots in part because of drought-induced herd reductions. Also, Australia’s grain-fed export markets in Asia, including China, have been expanding. MLA has reported that relatively high feedstuff costs have been a limitation to even more cattle on-feed in Australia.

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Vegan Linoleum 'Lino' Leather Soft and Durable Enough to Replace 'Rumen' Cow Hide – LIVEKINDLY

Designer Don Kwaning has created a material that mimics leather but is entirely vegan, architecture and design magazine Dezeen reports.

Called Lino Leather, as the name suggests, the material is made from linoleum, commonly used as flooring. Kwaning, who specializes in finding creative ways to use natural materials, teamed up with flooring manufacturer Forbo to generate new methods to treat linoleum to make it more versatile.

The Lino Leather comes in two forms. The first type, which is thicker than the other, is similar to rumen leather, usually made from a cow’s stomach. Kwaning has used this material, which has folds and a honeycomb structure, for wall panelling that has acoustic dampening properties, Dezeen reports.

The second Lino Leather kind is softer, closely replicating saddle leather, and could be used widely in commercial settings.

The materials are double-sided, unlike linoleum flooring. To do this, Kwaning placed the textile backing that is usually needed to stabilize linoleum in between two layers of his vegan leather. He believes it could be used in furniture design and upholstery.

According to Kwaning, linoleum, which has existed for more than 100 years, is an “overlooked material” with “great future potential.” 

“Many people don’t even know it’s made from only natural materials,” he added.

Linoleum is made from plant-based oils and resins combined with minerals or fine powders, like ground cork. It is then placed onto a textile backing, like canvas, and tinted various colours.

“I took out all the pigments to give the material more depth, which also gives the Linoleum Leather a more natural look since the materials that it is made from show in the colour,” Kwaning told Dezeen. “The colours that you see are the colours of the wood-flour which is one of the Linoleum Leather components.”

“I like projects that aim to change the industry by introducing new ecological substitutes for existing materials that are toxic or harm animals,” Kwaning said. He has also used wetland weed to make furniture and packing.

Kwaning joins other innovators using vegan materials to craft cruelty-free leather. Hugo Boss uses pineapple to make leather men’s shoes, coconut water has been used to make leather-style handbags, and rugs made from palm leaves could replace cow-hide leather carpeting. German sneaker brand nat-2 uses coffee grounds to make leather shoes – they even smell like coffee.

The vegan leather industry is only becoming more popular, with the market set to be worth $85 billion by 2025.


Image Credit: Don Kwaning | Dezeen

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Vegan Linoleum ‘Lino’ Leather Soft and Durable Enough to Replace 'Rumen' Cow Hide

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Vegan Linoleum ‘Lino’ Leather Soft and Durable Enough to Replace 'Rumen' Cow Hide

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Designer Don Kwaning created Lino Leather, made from linoleum, as a cruelty-free, vegan alternative to rumen leather, made from the stomach of a cow.

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Jemima Webber

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Rug Report: Creature(-free) comforts are popular – Home Accents Today

Creature DomadaDomada’s cowhide rug

Without sacrificing good taste, area rugs are joining the list of vegan goods.

No animal products or byproducts used here.

“We’re capitalizing on cow-friendly hides,” said Blake Dennard, senior vice president of Kaleen Rugs. “Our new Chaps Collection answers to the growing population on the vegan side.”

Chaps, which Kaleen launched at the October High Point Market, is a collection of replica cowhides handmade in India of viscose and wool.

“No cowhides were used in the making of this product,” the company emphasized.

The same is true for Kas Rugs’ new indoor-outdoor selection of animal-inspired rugs. The Provo

Creature Capel SafariCapel Rugs Safari Leopard

Collection encompasses textured machine-woven rugs made of UV-treated polypropylene in a variety of spotted skin patterns.

“Our new Provo Collection has some animal inspiration behind it,” said Brianne Coradini, Kas Rugs’ marketing associate. “Faux animal designs are still a hot trend that is not going away. We [weren’t] offering any animal patterned outdoor rugs, so Provo [now] rounds out our assortment perfectly.”

Capel Rugs’ Luxe Shag collection of animal looks presents “a new take on shags” with its longer acrylic/polyester fibers. Plus, they “can even be cut into a pelt shape,” according to Cameron Capel, president of sales and marketing.

The company has several other species of animal-friendly rugs, like the machine-made Leopard that is based on a textile design by Kevin O’Brien, a licensee of Capel Rugs for the past eight years.

Animal prints, O’Brien said, “connect with us on several levels. Even though they have a practical purpose for the animal, they are naturally elegant and by definition perfect.”

He continued: “In our DNA, there is a connection to the wild origins of our own species and the wildness still very much present in these animals. We revere the primal nature of these beautiful animals and know that we are not really that far removed from them.”

For her latest introduction with Loloi Rugs, designer Justina Blakeney of “Jungalow” fame dreamed up a contemporary faux-tiger series in both native and exotic colorways. Ironically named Feroz, which means fierce in Spanish, this tame version of animal skin is hand-loomed by artisans in India and then feline formed.

Creature loloi verticalFeroz by Justina Blakeney x Loloi

Blakeney said the idea for Feroz came from an antique Tibetan prayer rug found at a flea market.

“I researched the history of these prayer rugs and learned that they tell a rich story of Tibetan culture and are full of Buddhist symbolism. They are traditionally on the smaller side and can be prohibitively expensive,” she said. “I wanted to put my own spin on them while paying homage to their Tibetan roots. My reinterpretation is a larger scale rug made of 100% wool and is a fanciful depiction of a tiger — an animal I love.”

Domada is a newcomer to the upscale rug industry, paving its path with a niche business: cowhide-shaped vintage rugs.

Launched earlier this year as an e-commerce business and now expanding into wholesale, Domada sources its products from Morocco, India and Turkey, with more countries currently being explored. Most of its rugs average about 70 years old and feature a range of classic and traditional Oriental designs, and many are one-of-a-kind.

“I want my pieces to be unusual. I look through thousands and thousands of rugs looking for special pieces,” founder Katherine Stevens said. “Hides bring an organic sense to spaces, but many responsive to this aesthetic shy away from them out of respect for the natural world,” Stevens said. “Conscious consumers are driving design away from doing harm, and our fusion of traditional, ethnic rugs with hide and skin shapes speaks perfectly to this market. Domada is proud to offer its cruelty-free collection. I love that we can make something special that feels organic but doesn’t harm any animals.”

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Is This the World's Smallest Cow? – Geek


Lil’ Bill was born weighing a little over one-tenth of what newborn calves typically weigh. (Photo Credit:
Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine/Facebook)

The internet went crazy for Knickers, the ginormous steer from Australia, and then Canada’s Dozer tried to enter the size war. But we think Lil’ Bill outshines them all.

The tiny calf was born weighing a little over one-tenth of what newborn calves typically weigh, and was just under 10 pounds when he was brought to the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Now, Lil’ Bill could possibly enter the record books as the world’s smallest cow.

Photo Credit: Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine/Facebook

“Occasionally, we get a case that has us scratching our heads a bit,” the college posted on their Facebook page. “Lil’ Bill is one of those cases!”

And because thousands of readers expressed delight in seeing the teeny-tiny bovine, Lil’ Bill now has his own Facebook hashtag #LilBill and the college has promised to post more updates on him.

News of the cutest new viral star from the animal world come on the heels of enormous steer Knickers, who was crowned world’s biggest “cow,” making a splash on social media. Knickers, who lives in Western Australia, is 300 times bigger than Lil’ Bill, weighing about 3,000 pounds.

Knickers’ owner tried to sell him last year, according to the BBC, but “meat processors said they simply couldn’t handle him.”

More on Geek.com:

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Dairy Outlook: Milk Price Recovery Will Be Here, Eventually – Dairy Herd Management

Farming requires a certain amount of optimism. No matter how bad it gets, things will turn around in six months. As the picture gets painted for the 2019 dairy forecast, that appears to be the case as the second half of the year will likely be when producers start to see price recovery.

Actually, looking back six months, prices were destined for recovery before tariffs on dairy products put in place by three of our top four largest customers—Mexico, Canada and China—derailed progress. As production continued to sail along, that drop in sales to those three countries plus the negative demand ripples in the market from that decision caused prices to lag throughout the remainder of the year. 

But it looks like prices are starting to rebuild. “Futures prices indicate that price relief is indeed about six months away,” says Mike North, president of Commodity Risk Management Group. 

The factors determining if and when that price recovery happens is simple supply-demand economics. 

Supply continues to be an issue with production still improving at just over 1% growth on a year-over-year basis. That continual growth still acts as a governor on any sort of price improvement. 

“We thought supply would back down given the tough financial times,” says Scott Brown, an economist at the University of Missouri. “Yet the data we have today in front of us suggests that’s very slow to do. In fact we have some states that are actually growing in terms of capital inventories.”

Supply will continue to hold down price improvement until something dramatic happens in the marketplace. That could come in the form of a smaller cow herd, North says. The latest USDA reports show that dairy producers have sent about 100,000 more cows to slaughter in 2018 than last year. According to North, historically when that many head have been culled we see the impact on prices in about 6 to 12 months.

“Demand aside, a lot of the movement toward really high prices that we have seen historically have come at the back end of extreme culling during very hard financial times,” North says. “We may already be there. Let’s face it, it’s been rough. With some of the adjustments by USDA to cow numbers, we may be already testing some of that philosophy.”

The rather static state of the milk supply means more pressure will be put on the demand side of the equation, and any forecasting of changes to global demand for U.S. products centers on tariffs. The tariffs haven’t helped demand, in fact our tariffs on China are having a negative impact on that country’s ability to purchase product on the global market, which puts a significant wet blanket on global demand.

“If we could remove the steel tariffs from Mexico so they would start buying our cheese without tariffs, that would be great,” North says. “And then if China came back to the table with any kind of zeal that would be a really big opportunity.”

The relative strength of the U.S. economy should support continued growth in domestic demand, as lower unemployment and higher wages puts more money in consumer products to spend more time in restaurants and buy higher value dairy products. 

“Frankly that domestic demand side has really pulled us,” Brown says. “Having the lowest unemployment rate in decades has just been the fuel that we needed to help us in a large supply situation.”

In the short term, economists are predicting a situation with 2019 milk prices similar to where prices were at in 2018, with improvement happening later in the year. “We’re forecasting maybe $1 higher than 2018,” says Brian Rice, founder and co-owner of Rice Dairy, a dairy brokerage firm. “We don’t see anything dramatically changing the supply-demand balance sheet. Things could change, but we don’t have the data that shows us that yet.”

Looking farther into the future, even with the stubborn supply situation and demand uncertainties, it’s likely producers will see $20 per cwt milk prices within the next five years. “I’d bet the over on an 85% certainty that prices will hit $20 within the next five years,” Rice says. “When is the big question, but there is a high probability that we’ll hit that in the next five years.”

To learn more about the dairy economy going into 2019, watch the U.S. Farm Report segment where Rice, Brown and North share their perspectives:

 

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Style Cowhide Rugs In 5 Different Ways – See It Now – Lonny Magazine

Photographed by Maria del Rio.

Whether you think of a rug as a starting point or a finishing touch, there’s no denying its power to transform a room. One of our favorite styles that can work in a variety of spaces? Cowhide rugs. It truly is a jack-of-all-trades. Layer a faux cowhide rug over a classic woven sisal, for instance, and a traditional space feels infinitely chicer. On its own, a cowhide rug could be the subtle dose of pattern you need to round out otherwise busy or eclectic decor.

In other words, every well-dressed room needs a rug. It serves a grounding stylish addition, while also providing texture and warmth to your floors. Not only are they a trendy and easy stand-in for a full-out reno, but a faux cowhide may be an easier way to incorporate one than you think.

A hot home-decor ticket in Argentina and originally fashioned out of cured cow skin (hence the name), modern and more humane versions of the cowhide rug are typically made of polyester with a suede backing underneath, and patterns that are either acid washed, natural, or stenciled. The big draw of the cowhide has been how durable it is (spotted versions are fantastic at camouflaging stains), but its low profile and wide-ranging colors and patterns mean it also blends seamlessly with any decor style. Yes, that even means the most minimalist spaces.

To prove it, we’ve rounded up five rooms that fit a variety of decor aesthetics that use a cowhide rug as its centerpiece. From a Hollywood Regency-style living room that is grounded with a neutral hue to a colorful entry stairway lined with a funky cowhide runner, this design proves its flexibility and durability.

The look may be distinct, but few rugs prove to be as versatile. Behold, the case for the cowhide:

Style Cowhide Rugs In 5 Different Ways

Photographed by Becky Kimball.

Eclectic

A zebra-print cowhide runner lines the stairway in the entryway of BURU founder Morgan Hutchinson’s Salt Lake City abode. Hutchinson, who runs the e-commerce site with her husband, Brett, mused on her home’s perfect pattern clash in a chat with Lonny. “Color makes me happy,” she says. “I would like to think it also makes my family and guests happy when they are in the space. My dream word for others to describe our house would be just that — HAPPY.”

Hutchinson describes it as a box of Skittles; we like call it eclecticism 101.

Back in the entryway, an equally graphic ikat rug is a surprising complement to the cowhide runner, while a balloon display ups the liveliness even further.

Style Cowhide Rugs In 5 Different Ways

Photographed by Ball & Albanese.

Beach House

Pop art and a sofa upholstered in a classic ticking stripe already feel like an unexpected combination, but fashion photographer Ben Watts threw a steamer trunk and a cowhide rug into the mix of his living room decor. Throughout the beach house in Montauk, New York, industrial flourishes serve as a counterpoint (and, no doubt, a topic of conversation) to the home’s more New England-style elements.

According to Hamptons Magazine, Watt’s collaborated with interior designer Staci Dover to furnish the house with classic pieces that would stand the test of time (oh hey, cowhide), later punching it up with his own collection of art and accents. Among them: A hot pink boom box, Day of the Dead-inspired works, and his own photographs, of course.

Style Cowhide Rugs In 5 Different Ways

Photographed by Jenna Peffley.

Traditional

How do you pull together splashy pieces like a Vladimir Kagan floating sofa, vintage chairs from Arredamenti Corallo, and a painting by Danvy Pham? Gather them around a black and white cowhide rug as Bare Collection’s Jeet Sohal did inside her Hancock Park home.

The rug’s colorway feels just as classic as the home’s formal features — think: wood panelling, gold-painted molding, and leaded glass windows — while giving the living room a little edge. While pops of mint, purple, and red bring the space into an eclectic palette, the natural rug ties it all together.

In fact, Sohal, who decorated the home herself, managed to strike the perfect balance between stately design and modern approachability, and she says she kept it all cohesive by using a bold color palette throughout the house.

Style Cowhide Rugs In 5 Different Ways

Photographed by Genevieve Garruppo.

Minimalist Meets Scandinavian

For some it’s considered minimalist, for others it’s bohemian Scandinavian. What’s indisputable is how this bedroom’s bone cowhide rug anchors this space.

“We wanted it to feel like the best parts of Venice — easy, livable, and casual,” designer Leanne Ford says of the California home she outfitted for fashion designer Amber Farr, founder of Ruby Skye.

All-white walls created a dreamy backdrop for Ford to layer on all the texture. Ford says this is the secret to a minimalist home with personality. “You don’t have to have much in your home for it to feel warm,” she shares. “The key is woods, stones, cozy textures, and shades of white for all of that to shine off of.” The result is a dreamy space perfect for cozying up at the end of the day.

Style Cowhide Rugs In 5 Different Ways

Photographed by Winnie Au.

Modern

It’s hard to imagine anything but the black-and-white zebra rug Victoria De La Fuente chose as the centerpiece of her West Village living room. But in actuality, any variation of a cowhide rug would work alongside the clean-lined furniture and millennial  pink walls throughout the cozy apartment.

Blending contemporary artwork with a few mid-century modern flourishes and loads of girly accents, De La Fuente says her home is an extension of her personality.

One other influence that helps tie the look together? Travel. “Having lived in over seven different cities [over the years], I try to get something local at every place I live at or visit,” she says. Thankfully, cowhides are also easy to tuck away into a spare suitcase.

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World's smallest cow discovered – Warwick Daily News

A tiny calf is a real-life mini moo after being born one-tenth the average size – and is now tipped for a place in the record books.

Lil' Bill shocked his owners at birth, weighing in at a mere 4.5kg but looking just like every other cow, except smaller.

Lil’ Bill weighed just 4.5kg at birth, one-tenth the average size of a calf. Picture: MSU

Lil’ Bill weighed just 4.5kg at birth, one-tenth the average size of a calf. Picture: MSU

Concerned for his health, Lil' Bill's owners took the tiny calf to the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine.

The university posted on its Facebook page that the case of Lil' Bill left veterinarians scratching their heads.

"He was born weighing a little over one-tenth of what newborn calves typically weigh," the post said.

Lil’ Bill is about to break the records as the smallest cow in the world. Picture: MSU

Lil’ Bill is about to break the records as the smallest cow in the world. Picture: MSU

"Occasionally, we get a case that has us scratching our heads a bit. Lil' Bill is one of those cases."

The miniature cow now has his own Facebook tag #LilBill, and the college has promised to post regular updates on his progress.

 

Knickers the cow is nearly 2m tall and weighs 1.4 tonnes. Picture: Sharon Smith

Knickers the cow is nearly 2m tall and weighs 1.4 tonnes. Picture: Sharon Smith

News of the tiny star's arrival last week comes just days after the world was introduced to a mammoth steer in Western Australia which has since been crowned the world's biggest cow.

Knickers, who weighs 1.4 tonnes – 300 times more than Lil' Bill – was saved from the slaughterhouse because he was deemed just too big to kill.

Standing 1.95m tall, the seven-year-old Holstein Friesian's startling size meant he was too heavy to go to the abattoir.

Cattle farmer Geoff Pearson said: "I wouldn't be able to put it through a processing facility," he said. "So I think it will just live happily ever after."

Revelations of the giant's escape from the chop soon sparked tales of more amazing bovine behemoths scattered around the globe.

And according to Guinness World Records, the tallest steer on the planet can be found in Italy – a 201cm Chianina ox named Bellino.

This article originally appeared on The Sun and was reproduced with permission

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Lil' Bill could be the world's tiniest cow – NEWS.com.au

A tiny calf is a real-life mini moo after being born one-tenth the average size — and is now tipped for a place in the record books.

Lil’ Bill shocked his owners at birth, weighing in at a mere 4.5kg but looking just like every other cow, except smaller.

Concerned for his health, Lil’ Bill’s owners took the tiny calf to the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine.

The university posted on its Facebook page that the case of Lil’ Bill left veterinarians scratching their heads.

“He was born weighing a little over one-tenth of what newborn calves typically weigh,” the post said.

“Occasionally, we get a case that has us scratching our heads a bit. Lil’ Bill is one of those cases.”

The miniature cow now has his own Facebook tag #LilBill, and the college has promised to post regular updates on his progress.

News of the tiny star’s arrival last week comes just days after the world was introduced to a mammoth steer in Western Australia which has since been crowned the world’s biggest cow.

Knickers, who weighs 1.4 tonnes — 300 times more than Lil’ Bill — was saved from the slaughterhouse because he was deemed just too big to kill.

Standing 1.95m tall, the seven-year-old Holstein Friesian’s startling size meant he was too heavy to go to the abattoir.

Cattle farmer Geoff Pearson said: “I wouldn’t be able to put it through a processing facility,” he said. “So I think it will just live happily ever after.”

Revelations of the giant’s escape from the chop soon sparked tales of more amazing bovine behemoths scattered around the globe.

And according to Guinness World Records, the tallest steer on the planet can be found in Italy — a 201cm Chianina ox named Bellino.

This article originally appeared on The Sun and was reproduced with permission

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Three arrested in connection with police killing during 'cow vigilante' clashes in India – CNN

The shootings are the latest in a wave of mob violence branded as “cow vigilantism” that critics say is growing on Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s watch.
Clashes between villagers and police broke out in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh after cow carcasses were allegedly discovered in a village near the city of Bulandshahr, about 46 miles from the capital, New Delhi.
India’s majority Hindu population consider cows to be sacred animals and most states, including Uttar Pradesh, have banned their slaughter.
Hundreds of protesters gathered on a highway and began pelting officers with stones, demanding police take action over the alleged cattle deaths, Inspector Rajeev Kumar Gupta, of Meerut police, told CNN.
“The police had to resort to firing their guns in the air,” said Gupta.
In the ensuing violence, a police officer, Subodh Kumar Singh, and a local man were shot and killed. Singh was shot in the head, according to the autopsy report.
Police said they have arrested three people and are looking for another 24 thought to be involved in the violent clashes. A special investigation team has also been formed to find out who started the violence.
The Uttar Pradesh government said it would compensate the family of the slain officer with 5 million rupees (around $71,000) as well as a government job and pension.
An Indian policeman looks on after receiving treatment for a head injury following reports of mob violence at Chingravati village in Bulandshahr, on December 3, 2018. An Indian policeman looks on after receiving treatment for a head injury following reports of mob violence at Chingravati village in Bulandshahr, on December 3, 2018.

Cow vigilante killings

Mob attacks involving so-called cow vigilantes have increased in India over the past few years, with groups brutally beating or lynching those — particularly Muslims and other minorities — suspected of killing or transporting cows for slaughter, or for eating beef.
One of the highest profile cases happened in 2015, when Mohammed Akhlaq, a Muslim blacksmith and resident of Uttar Pradesh, was beaten to death by an angry mob. His son was also critically injured in the violence, after rumors spread through their village that the family had slaughtered a cow. Fifteen people were charged for his murder in a case that prompted national outrage.
A string of similar attacks in the years since has sharpened fears about the spread of Hindu nationalism in a country that is home to more than 170 million Muslims.
India: Slow police response to latest mob attack sparks outrageIndia: Slow police response to latest mob attack sparks outrage
Modi’s government has come under intense criticism for not keeping the vigilante groups in check and for what critics say is a lackluster response to the attacks.
In a tweet posted last year, Modi condemned cow vigilantism. “No person in this nation has the right to take the law in his or her own hands in this country,” hesaid. “Killing people in the name of Gau Bhakti (cow devotion) is not acceptable. This is not something Mahatma Gandhi would approve.”
Still, the rise in mob violence has coincided with the electoral success of Modi’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), which critics say has helped foster a culture of religious intolerance since coming to power in 2014.
Modi’s BJP is strongly aligned with the country’s conservative Hindu nationalists, the more extreme elements of which believe India should be governed in accordance with strict Hindu beliefs.
Leading up to the 2014 national elections, Modi campaigned on the promise of ending a “pink revolution” — a phrase describing the slaughter of cattle across the country.
“When animals are slaughtered, the color of their flesh is pink, and that is why it is called the ‘Pink Revolution,'” he said at a rally in the eastern state of Bihar.
#NotInMyName: Indians protest against rise in mob violence #NotInMyName: Indians protest against rise in mob violence
The issue has become a tinder box for the historically fraught relationship between Hindus and Muslims in the country, where communal violence between the two communities is common.
In 2017, at least 111 people died in more than 800 communal attacks in India, according to government statistics.
The state where the most recent attack occurred, Uttar Pradesh, saw the biggest nationwide increase in communal violence that year, with 44 deaths in 195 reported incidents.

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