Indigenous arts at the forefront at CASA May weekend in Lethbridge – Prairie Post

Indigenous arts are a powerful bridge for reconnecting with culture, learning traditions and bringing together diverse groups to celebrate Indigenous cultures, said Natalie Pepin from Reskilled Life.

Don’t miss the ultimate Lethbridge Indigenous Arts Immersion Weekend at CASA (located at 230 8 Street South) in May. Three popular Indigenous arts workshops will be featured including Metis beading, moccasin making and brain tanning.

“With people from all backgrounds welcome, these workshops are a welcoming place where urban Indigenous populations can experience their traditions and others from all backgrounds can expand their skills,” Pepin explained.

A traditional Metis beading workshop will be held May 29 from 6-9 p.m. “Join us for a cultural immersion through art and stories. Connect with the Metis culture through one of our most celebrated and cherished skills, flower bead work,” Pepin said.

This course, Pepin noted, will teach those in attendance how to design and bead traditional designs using glass beads for moccasins, mittens and more. “We will provide all materials for you to create your first beaded artwork on melton.” Tickets for this workshop are $40.

A moccasin making workshop will be held May 30 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

“Whether you are eager to explore leather working techniques or are wanting to create a perfect personalized gift for a special person, this workshop will walk you step-by-step through the process of making your first pair of moccasins,” Pepin said.

In this workshop, those in attendance will learn:

•How to select materials for making footwear

•How to create a footwear pattern that will fit you just right

•How to cut and work with leather

•Lacing techniques

•Cutting and sewing furs

•Embellishment options and basic beading

Tickets for this workshop are $175.

A brain tanning hides workshop will be held May 31 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. (with an option tanning tool building day on May 30 from 5-9 p.m. – where participants will build their own tanning tools).

Are you intrigued by the idea of making your own suede, buckskin or tanned hides for moccasins, crafts, clothing or to be more connected to the sources of your clothing? Does the idea of participating in the full-life cycle of your garments excite you? Do you want to preserve the memories of the hunt without the cost of a tannery? Or maybe you’d like to commemorate the life of an animal you raised?

“It could also be traditional skills are just a part of who you are and you have a burning desire to reconnect with our collective roots,” added Pepin. “Regardless of your motivation, this workshop is offered up as a guide as you set out on this journey.”

According to Pepin, this full-day workshop will introduce you to the concepts and sills involved in turning an animal hide into buckskin (a hair off, soft fabric like “leather”) and hair on hide (think, cow hide rug).

You will learn about:

•How to properly remove a hide in order to preserve it

•How to preserve a hide until tanning

•Natural and easy to access materials for tanning tides

•How tanning works

•The physiology of skin

•How to process both hair on and hair off skins

•Scrapping hides

•Pickling hides

•Wringing methods

•Acidifying buckskin for a soft and supple fabric like hide

•Brain tanning solutions

•Stretching methods and tools

•Smoking hides to keep them water resistant

“This is a hands-on workshop where you will have the opportunity to work on hides at each stage of the tanning process,” said Pepin. This workshop is $115.

Photos submitted

Natalie Pepin from Reskilled Life

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🔥Best floor rugs for your living room, kitchen or dining room🔥 – Moose Gazette – Moose Gazette

A well-chosen rug is the perfect way to breathe new life into your home.

Whether you’re a renter or homeowner, rugs can effortlessly transform the look and feel of a room. They add colour, texture and personality to your space, offering the same transformative effect as a framed print or paint on the wall.

Even if you’ve already got carpet covering your floors, there’s something undeniably chic about layering a rug on top. Choose wisely, and it can even make your space appear bigger.

As well as switching up your aesthetics, a rug can protect flooring from furniture and add a sense of cosiness that’s particularly welcome on a cold morning.

If you’ve never shopped for a rug before, the choice can be staggering. Here’s a quick run through on some of the most popular styles on offer.

Looking for a bargain? Check out the Graham & Green winter rug sale on now

Popular rug styles

Shaggy rugs

Get your mind out of the gutter, it’s not what you think. In the rug world, a shag refers to a covering with a thick plush pile. Soft and snuggly, they look luxe but they can be a nightmare to clean depending on the length of the pile. Typically made from wool, leather or acrylic fibres, they’re ideal for bedrooms and living rooms.​

Looking for a shag (rug)? Check out the Rug Seller or Next for the best January deals. 

Synthetic and patterned rugs

If you’re a homewares hound, you’ve probably got a Pinterest board full of this style of rug. They’re cheap, easy to clean and come in more patterns and styles than you could possibly imagine.

Synthetic rugs are also made to last and perfect for high footfall areas like corridors and landings – they’ll withstand fading and look great for ages. Perfect for indoors as well as the garden or patio, they’re also a lot less expensive than other types of rug, making them a great option for anyone on a budget.

Homebase has a huge selection at prices to suit most wallets, such as this Maestro Chevron Teal Rug, £24.

Wool rugs

Durable, naturally stain-resistant and sustainable, wool rugs have always been popular. The textile collects dirt and debris in small pockets within the weave, making it easier to clean than their synthetic counterparts and the oils and moisture locked into the fibres give them a natural flame-resistance. They also feel lovely underfoot. One of our favourite versions at the moment is the Scandi-looking Fes Tufted 100% Wool Rug, £399 from MADE.

Shop the MADE rug sale on now

View more wool rugs from MADE

Sheepskin and cowhide skin rugs

As well as leather, this category includes sheepskin and cowhide. They offer a distinctive look but in the current climate they’re not for everyone. If you’ve got your heart set on one, look out for ethically made styles, or better yet fake it with a synthetic or faux fur version​.

Looking for a sheepskin rug? Graham and Green have a gorgeous range of sheepskin rugs with pops of colour or in a wide range of natural tones.

View sheepskin rugs from Graham and Green
View sheepskin rugs from Very
View sheepskin rugs from Cox&Cox

Antique and traditional rugs

The diamond standard, this style covers Turkish, Indian and Persian rugs. Prices can soar into the millions; in fact, the most expensive rug ever sold is the Sotheby’s ’17th Century Antique Persian Carpet’ which went for a cool $33m. Genuine rugs tend to be heirloom treasures, passed down through the generations. If you like the lavish patterns and an antique look, there are some incredible imitations out there for a snip of the price.​ Prime example? The Havana Rug, £139 from iRugs.co.uk

If you’re a fan of The Big Lebowski​, you’ll no doubt remember the famous rug that “really tied the room together”. While the source of the original Lebowski rug remains a mystery, Wayfair’s bohemian rug collection is a fitting substitute. 

Over dyed rugs and faded rugs

A new trend has emerged in interiors recently; the over dyed and faded rug. It’s a way of upcycling an old rug (typically a traditional style rug) by cleaning it and applying a strong dye over the top so that it’s heavily saturated with colour. The final result is a like a block colour filter over a patterned rug.

View over dyed rugs from Etsy

View faded rugs from MADE or Wayfair

Different rug making techniques

Aside from style, there’s the construction of a rug to consider. How it’s made will determine how it looks, feels and lasts.

Hand-tufted: made without knots, loops of yarn are instead pulled through the rug’s backing by hand or with a special tool.

Hooked rugs: a close cousin of tufting but this time the loops remain intact. They don’t get sheared off and are left as they are to create a homely embroidered effect.

Flat-weaves: woven together on a loom, these come without a pile. There’s no backing, which means they are reversible.

Hand-knotted: crafted by skilled artisans, hand-knotted rugs take the longest to make. Each yarn gets tied individually and the knots make up the surface of the rug. They’re expensive and best suited for low-traffic formal spaces.

Aside from style and method, the other things you should bear in mind when rug-shopping is where it will go and your budget. Thanks to the wealth of rugs available, there are designs to suit all rooms, tastes and budgets.

The best part is, you don’t even have to leave the comfort of home to find your perfect rug. There are dozens of rug sellers and big retailers who all sell the floor coverings online, and many of them deliver for free too.

See our favourites below

Best Rugs to buy in 2020

Floor Story

Price level: £££

Think of Floor Story as Dover Street Market for rugs. There are dozens of high end designers to peruse – with high end prices to match. If you’re looking for something unique and you’re prepared to invest, you’ll find a rug you’ll love on this website.

Our favourite? Named Giovanni by John Booth, this handsome fella is hand-knotted in Nepal and takes 12 weeks for delivery. Guaranteed to command the attention of any room.

Want something truly unique? Check out Floor Story’s Custom service, the place to bring your wildest rug ideas to life.

Shop Floor Story rugs now

The Rug Seller

Price level: ££

Based in Manchester, the Rug Seller not only offers free delivery on its massive stock of rugs, but they have a price guarantee on the cheapest online rugs across the UK. There’s play rugs for kids’ bedrooms, floral print mats, thick pile coverings, rugs that look like watercolour paintings and others that resemble flags. The choice is stupendous, but thankfully you can narrow down the search with category or colours sections. 

Shop The Rug Seller rugs now

Graham & Green

Price level: ££

Offering a more boutique-approach to the world of rugs, Graham & Green’s small-ish collection spans hides as well as runners, bath and door mats alongside traditional rugs. Prices range from the top-end £1,495 to an extremely reasonable £21. If it’s a laid back boho aesthetic you’re chasing, check for your dream rug here first.

Shop Graham & Green rugs now

Dunelm

Price level: ££

Ranging from just £8 up to £1,349, Dunelm stocks a huge range of mainly synthetic and wool rugs to suit the home. There are rugs of every description, including a special collection with patterns from the V&A (pictured).

Shop Dunelm rugs now

Wayfair

Price level: ££

Wayfair stocks an impressively huge array of rugs at prices that are impossible to be refuse, such is the case with this vintage cotton rug (from £77).

Another innovative example is the Gel-Back Washable Orange/Beige Rug (£5.47) which bears more than a passing resemblance to the paper version of a London Underground travel card.

On the other end of the scale, arty types will adore the Esme Hand Tufted Wool Blue Rug (£859.99); the washed blue tones have echoes of a Mark Rothko painting.

If you’re looking for inspiration on your rug-buying journey, Wayfair’s offering is a superb place to start.

Shop Wayfair rugs now

Heal’s

Price level: ££

Whether you’re after a runner for your hallway, a plush pile by your bed, or even something to warm to protect you from the cold kitchen tiles, you’ll find something that fits at Heal’s.

While there’s a great selection of plain, neutral-hued rugs to slide seamlessly into your décor, we’re suckers for a splash of pattern. Check out the thick and soft Berber rugs which offer elegant patterns on monochromatic colourways.

Shop Heal’s rugs now

MADE

Price level: ££

You’ll find statement rugs big and small at MADE, the online homewares store on a mission to help you put a stamp on your home. The offerings, like this geometric rug, err more to the colourful side, making them ideal for brightening up those all-magnolia spaces that landlords seem to love so much – renters take note. ​

Shop MADE rugs now

Habitat

Price level: ££

Offering the final piece of the jigsaw to your home decor, Habitat has a wide range of rugs, and at the moment many of them are in the January sale, making it prime time to scoop up a bargain. From wool rugs to cotton runners, minimal carpets and statement coverings, Habitat has you – and your floors – covered. Our pick of the bunch is this flatweave wool rug with an Aztec pattern and in a ‘fits-anywhere’ monochrome palette, £85, down from £170. ​

Shop Habitat rugs now

Woven

Price level: £££

Did you know that Calvin Klein did rugs? Us neither. You can find CK and other design labels – think Designers Guild, Orla Kiely, Wedgewood and Ted Baker – at Woven, an online rug specialist. 

There are some quirky finds to stumble upon, like this red Japan rug by GAN (£2,080), handmade in India. So, make a fresh cuppa, settle down and get ready for deep dive browsing. 

Shop Woven rugs now

Hide Rugs

Price level: £££

Hankering for a rugged cowboy look? Dress the floors of your ranch with an animal hide from Hide Rugs – there’s everything from cow to sheepskin and reindeer to choose from. The company is keen to stress that every rug they sell is made as a bi-product of the meat industry – no animal was killed purely for their skin. ​Products are high quality and made to last.

Shop Hide Rugs now 

London House Rugs

Price level: £££

Purveyors of classic, vintage and contemporary rugs, London House has a massive selection with rugs handwoven in far-flung destination such as Afghanistan, Iran and India; all countries with rug-making traditions that stretch back centuries.

The overdyed rugs are worth a look, if only for window shopping purposes alone.

Shop London House Rugs now

Studio Knot

Price level: £££

With a commitment to making ethical rugs with sustainable materials and practices, Studio Knot is ​the place to visit for a design upgrade that will spark conversation. Their artist collabs are distinctive and quirky – you certainly won’t find anything else like this on the high street.

We’ve fallen hopelessly in love with illustrator Lesley Barnes’ pink leopard. At £600 in the sale, it’s not exactly a wallet-friendly buy, but it may be worth saving a few pay days for.

Shop Studio Knot rugs now

Cold Picnic

Price level: £££

Diorama by Cold Picnic

Creatures of the Sea rug by Cold Picnic

Based in New York, USA, this rug specialist has cut itself a corner of the rug market and specialises in wool rugs, cotton quilts and blankets and bathmats with clean abstract designs.​ T

Rugs come in three sizes and international shipping is offered to customers across the pond and elsewhere. 

Shop Cold Picnic rugs now

IKEA

Price level: ££

Anyone who’s taken a walk through IKEA’s in-store marketplace will surely have bypassed the rug section. True to its core belief that homewares should be affordable for all, there’s a huge range of relatively inexpensive designs on sale, including a real sheepskin one for less than £30. They aren’t as luxe as the £60 sheepskin from Graham and Green — but still decent.  

Shop IKEA rugs now

Rug Artisan

Price level: £££

If you’ve always wanted to design your own rug, make a digital beeline for Rug Artisan. The company offers a vast selection of colours, designs, yarns and shapes to help you come up with your ideal rug – and best of all, no one else will have it. Now that’s truly unique.

Shop Rug Artisan rugs now

Weaver Green

Price level: ££

On a mission to transform trash to treasure, Weaver Green takes recycled plastic bottles and turns them into beautiful floor coverings for your home or office.

There are accessories too; think rugs and cushions but don’t try to match it all – an eclectic boho look is king at Weaver Green.

Shop Weaver Green rugs now

ESBest product reviews are unbiased, independent advice you can trust. On some occasions, we earn revenue if you click the links and buy the products, but we never allow this to bias our coverage. The reviews are compiled through a mix of expert opinion and real-world testing.

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The Best Movies New to Every Major Streaming Platform in March 2020 – IndieWire

Netflix gets most of the attention, but it’s hardly a one-stop shop for cinephiles who are looking to stream essential classic and contemporary films. Each of the prominent streaming platforms caters to its own niche of film obsessives.

From mainstream fare on Amazon Prime and Hulu to the boundless wonders of the Criterion Channel, and esoteric (but unmissable) festival hits on Film Movement Plus and OVID.tv, IndieWire’s monthly guide highlights the best of what’s coming to every major streaming site, with an eye toward exclusive titles that may help readers decide which service is right for them.

Here’s the best of the best for March 2020.

Popular on IndieWire

Sign Up: Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

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Stop big game trophy hunting – Newton Daily News

“International trophy hunting is a multinational, multimillion-dollar industry practiced throughout the world. Trophy hunting is broadly defined as the killing of animals for recreation with the purpose of collecting trophies such as horns, antlers, skulls, skins, tusks, or teeth for display. The United States imports the most trophies of any country in the world.” Read the 26-page report by the Congressional Research Service (March 20, 2019). crsreports.congress.gov.

American trophy hunters pay big money to kill animals overseas and import 126,000 wildlife trophies per year. They also do their sport-killing domestically: Bears, bobcats, mountain lions, wolves and other domestic wildlife fall victim to trophy hunting, damaging natural ecosystems. humanesociety.org.

The United States, international trophy hunting is addressed by several laws, including the Endangered Species Act. ESA does not regulate trophy-hunting activities within range countries directly; rather, the law governs what can be imported into the United States. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) regulates trophy hunting, in part, by issuing permits to import trophies of species that are listed as threatened or endangered under ESA. crsreports.congress.gov.

Excuses. Excuses. Excuses. Trophy hunters rationalize reasons out the wazoo to justify killing of animals in the wild. Hunters pump money into the economy. Hunters help with conservationism. Really? Hunters kill for the thrill. And hang their prize on walls to brag. Decorate your walls with something else. Is destroying wildlife for pleasure unethical? Yes. 

“Trophy hunting — the killing of big game for a set of horns or tusks, a skin, or a taxidermied body—has burgeoned into a billion-dollar, profit-driven industry, overseen in some cases by corrupt governments. Many countries in sub-Saharan Africa allow trophy hunting, with varying degrees of transparency and control, establishing yearly quotas meant to reflect the status of species and creating exclusions for highly vulnerable populations. South Africa, for instance, no longer allows hunting of leopards. Kenya has banned trophy hunting outright since 1977, and in Botswana, a comparatively wildlife-rich country, a temporary ban in government-controlled hunting areas went into effect in 2014,” according to an article in National Geographic.

Cecil, a famed black-maned lion in Zimbabwe, was lured with bait, shot with an arrow and suffered for more than 10 hours before his hunters tracked and finished killing him in 2015. Cecil’s death sparked international outrage in 2015; his son, Xanda, met a similar fate two years later. humanesociety.org.

Cecil, the lion, was stalked and killed by a Minnesota dentist under the guise of conservation. How much did that cost him for bragging and boasting rights? 

Trophy hunting in places where animals are bred and held captive for the purpose of being killed (canned hunting) results in cutting off the head of a creature to decorate a wall. Ah, have a beer and boast. Oh, have a bratwurst and brag. 

Why do people thrill kill animals? “Why we may never understand the reasons people hunt animals as ‘trophies’” is an explanation by criminologist Dr. Xanthe Mallett. “Perhaps hunting large animals is an example of some people’s need to show dominance over others. Research shows increased levels of hostility and a need for power and control are associated with poor attitudes towards animals, among men in particular.” theconversation.com.

“Of all the animals, man is the only one that is cruel. He is the only one that inflicts pain for the pleasure of doing it. — Mark Twain

Writing this column, I searched around my house to make sure I was not being a hypocrite. Any items made of ivory? No. Any bearskin rugs on my floor? No. Any boots or bags made of crocodile skin? No. Any coats made of animal fur? No. Any pillows made of duck feathers? No. I do own a purse and a pair of boots that are partly made of cow hide (leather). I’m assuming the leather is a byproduct of the meat from the cow which feeds humans. While growing up, I ate venison. Chicken, turkey, and seafood have a place on my table. And on occasion, I eat bacon. But I’ve never committed an animal thrill kill.

Melissa Martin, Ph.D., is an author, columnist, educator and therapist. Contact her at melissamcolumnist@gmail.com.

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Op-ed: Stop Big Game Trophy Hunting – Jamaica Plain Gazette

By Melissa Martin, Ph.D.

“International trophy hunting is a
multinational, multimillion-dollar industry practiced throughout the world.
Trophy hunting is broadly defined as the killing of animals for recreation with
the purpose of collecting trophies such as horns, antlers, skulls, skins,
tusks, or teeth for display. The United States imports the most trophies of any
country in the world.” Read the 26-page report by the Congressional Research
Service (March 20, 2019). www.crsreports.congress.gov.

 American trophy hunters pay big money to kill
animals overseas and import 126,000 wildlife trophies per year. They also do
their sport-killing domestically: Bears, bobcats, mountain lions, wolves and
other domestic wildlife fall victim to trophy hunting, damaging natural
ecosystems. www.humanesociety.org.

 The United States, international trophy
hunting is addressed by several laws, including the Endangered Species Act. ESA
does not regulate trophy-hunting activities within range countries directly;
rather, the law governs what can be imported into the United States. The U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) regulates trophy hunting, in part, by issuing
permits to import trophies of species that are listed as threatened or
endangered under ESA. www.crsreports.congress.gov.

 Excuses. Excuses. Excuses. Trophy hunters
rationalize reasons out the wazoo to justify killing of animals in the wild.
Hunters pump money into the economy. Hunters help with conservationism. Really?
Hunters kill for the thrill. And hang their prize on walls to brag. Decorate
your walls with something else. Is destroying wildlife for pleasure unethical?
Yes.

 “Trophy hunting—the killing of big game for a
set of horns or tusks, a skin, or a taxidermied body—has burgeoned into a
billion-dollar, profit-driven industry, overseen in some cases by corrupt
governments. Many countries in sub-Saharan Africa allow trophy hunting, with
varying degrees of transparency and control, establishing yearly quotas meant
to reflect the status of species and creating exclusions for highly vulnerable
populations. South Africa, for instance, no longer allows hunting of leopards.
Kenya has banned trophy hunting outright since 1977, and in Botswana, a
comparatively wildlife-rich country, a temporary ban in government-controlled
hunting areas went into effect in 2014,” according to an article in National
Geographic.

 Cecil, a famed black-maned lion in Zimbabwe,
was lured with bait, shot with an arrow and suffered for more than 10 hours
before his hunters tracked and finished killing him in 2015. Cecil’s death
sparked international outrage in 2015; his son, Xanda, met a similar fate two years
later. www.humanesociety.org.

 Cecil, the lion, was stalked and killed by a
Minnesota dentist under the guise of conservation. How much did that cost him
for bragging and boasting rights?

 Trophy hunting in places where animals are
bred and held captive for the purpose of being killed (canned hunting) results
in cutting off the head of a creature to decorate a wall. Ah, have a beer and
boast. Oh, have a bratwurst and brag.

 Why do people thrill kill animals? “Why we may
never understand the reasons people hunt animals as ‘trophies’” is an
explanation by criminologist Dr. Xanthe Mallett. “Perhaps hunting large animals
is an example of some people’s need to show dominance over others. Research
shows increased levels of hostility and a need for power and control are
associated with poor attitudes towards animals, among men in particular.”
www.theconversation.com.

 “Of all the animals, man is the only one that
is cruel. He is the only one that inflicts pain for the pleasure of doing
it.—Mark Twain

Writing
this column, I searched around my house to make sure I was not being a
hypocrite. Any items made of ivory? No. Any bearskin rugs on my floor? No. Any
boots or bags made of crocodile skin? No. Any coats made of animal fur? No. Any
pillows made of duck feathers? No. I do own a purse and a pair of boots that
are partly made of cow hide (leather). I’m assuming the leather is a byproduct
of the meat from the cow which feeds humans. While growing up, I ate venison.
Chicken, turkey, and seafood have a place on my table. And on occasion, I eat
bacon. But I’ve never committed an animal thrill kill.

 Melissa Martin, Ph.D., is an author,
columnist, educator, and therapist. She lives in Ohio. Contact her at
[email protected]

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Guest Op-ed: Stop Big Game Trophy Hunting – Lynn Journal

<!–/*
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By Melissa Martin, Ph.D.

“International trophy hunting is a
multinational, multimillion-dollar industry practiced throughout the world.
Trophy hunting is broadly defined as the killing of animals for recreation with
the purpose of collecting trophies such as horns, antlers, skulls, skins,
tusks, or teeth for display. The United States imports the most trophies of any
country in the world.” Read the 26-page report by the Congressional Research
Service (March 20, 2019). www.crsreports.congress.gov.

 American trophy hunters pay big money to kill
animals overseas and import 126,000 wildlife trophies per year. They also do
their sport-killing domestically: Bears, bobcats, mountain lions, wolves and
other domestic wildlife fall victim to trophy hunting, damaging natural
ecosystems. www.humanesociety.org.

<!–/*
* The backup image section of this tag has been generated for use on a
* non-SSL page. If this tag is to be placed on an SSL page, change the
* 'http://sparkwiresolutions.com/revive/www/delivery/…'
* to
* 'https://sparkwiresolutions.com/revive/www/delivery/…'
*
* This noscript section of this tag only shows image banners. There
* is no width or height in these banners, so if you want these tags to
* allocate space for the ad before it shows, you will need to add this
* information to the tag.
*
* If you do not want to deal with the intricities of the noscript
* section, delete the tag (from … to ). On
* average, the noscript tag is called from less than 1% of internet
* users.
*/–>

 The
United States, international trophy hunting is addressed by several laws,
including the Endangered Species Act. ESA does not regulate trophy-hunting
activities within range countries directly; rather, the law governs what can be
imported into the United States. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS)
regulates trophy hunting, in part, by issuing permits to import trophies of
species that are listed as threatened or endangered under ESA.
www.crsreports.congress.gov.

 Excuses. Excuses. Excuses. Trophy hunters
rationalize reasons out the wazoo to justify killing of animals in the wild.
Hunters pump money into the economy. Hunters help with conservationism. Really?
Hunters kill for the thrill. And hang their prize on walls to brag. Decorate
your walls with something else. Is destroying wildlife for pleasure unethical?
Yes.

 “Trophy hunting—the killing of big game for a
set of horns or tusks, a skin, or a taxidermied body—has burgeoned into a
billion-dollar, profit-driven industry, overseen in some cases by corrupt
governments. Many countries in sub-Saharan Africa allow trophy hunting, with
varying degrees of transparency and control, establishing yearly quotas meant
to reflect the status of species and creating exclusions for highly vulnerable
populations. South Africa, for instance, no longer allows hunting of leopards.
Kenya has banned trophy hunting outright since 1977, and in Botswana, a
comparatively wildlife-rich country, a temporary ban in government-controlled
hunting areas went into effect in 2014,” according to an article in National
Geographic.

 Cecil,
a famed black-maned lion in Zimbabwe, was lured with bait, shot with an arrow
and suffered for more than 10 hours before his hunters tracked and finished
killing him in 2015. Cecil’s death sparked international outrage in 2015; his
son, Xanda, met a similar fate two years later. www.humanesociety.org.

 Cecil,
the lion, was stalked and killed by a Minnesota dentist under the guise of
conservation. How much did that cost him for bragging and boasting rights?

 Trophy
hunting in places where animals are bred and held captive for the purpose of
being killed (canned hunting) results in cutting off the head of a creature to
decorate a wall. Ah, have a beer and boast. Oh, have a bratwurst and brag.

 Why do
people thrill kill animals? “Why we may never understand the reasons people
hunt animals as ‘trophies’” is an explanation by criminologist Dr. Xanthe
Mallett. “Perhaps hunting large animals is an example of some people’s need to
show dominance over others. Research shows increased levels of hostility and a
need for power and control are associated with poor attitudes towards animals,
among men in particular.” www.theconversation.com.

 “Of
all the animals, man is the only one that is cruel. He is the only one that
inflicts pain for the pleasure of doing it.”—Mark Twain

Writing this column, I searched around my
house to make sure I was not being a hypocrite. Any items made of ivory? No.
Any bearskin rugs on my floor? No. Any boots or bags made of crocodile skin?
No. Any coats made of animal fur? No. Any pillows made of duck feathers? No. I
do own a purse and a pair of boots that are partly made of cow hide (leather).
I’m assuming the leather is a byproduct of the meat from the cow, which feeds
humans. While growing up, I ate venison. Chicken, turkey, and seafood have a
place on my table. And on occasion, I eat bacon. But I’ve never committed an
animal thrill-kill. Melissa
Martin, Ph.D., is an author, columnist, educator, and therapist. She lives in
Ohio. Contact her at [email protected]

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36 Hours in Buenos Aires – The New York Times

The only thing that’s consistent in Argentina is change: Political about-faces happen regularly, and the economy is often in flux. In October, Argentines voted out the right-wing party that had been in power for four years, replacing it with the leftist Frente de Todos, in an election that reflected dissatisfaction with inflation and other economic problems. The residents of Buenos Aires are so used to these kinds of ups and downs, though, that the city continues on, regardless, producing amazing new restaurants; inventing fresh ways to showcase the country’s always-thrilling wine offerings; developing an exceptionally stimulating arts scene; and coming up with creative twists on tradition in everything from aperitifs to bookstores. Visiting Buenos Aires is always filled with new discoveries and beloved stalwarts.

(Note: Because of inflation, prices are subject to frequent change.)

36 Hours in Buenos Aires

Just two blocks from Falena is a laid-back corner bar with an impeccable pedigree: It’s owned by four of the country’s leading names in bars, restaurants and wine. They banded together to create La Fuerza, a brand of vermouth inspired by the country’s long tradition of aperitivos, and serve it up at this lively spot with the same name that opened in 2018. The red and white vermouths on tap are made with local botanicals and mixed with soda or tonic — the perfect pre-dinner drink. The bar is usually full at happy hour (6 to 7:30 p.m.), when a vermouth and soda costs about 100 pesos, or less than $2, instead of the usual 155, but there’s another midday happy hour between noon and 1 p.m.

Once a train station where deliveries of milk arrived from the countryside, the Patio de los Lecheros is an open-air food hall centered around long communal tables filled with young couples in love, parents with children (occasionally, a magician wanders through the crowd performing tricks) and entire multigenerational families, from grandparents to babies. When the weather is good, lines for the barbecue, fish, pizza and taco places can get long, but settle in with a craft beer, a glass of organic wine, or a Fernet and Coke (an Argentine classic) and wait for the crowds to thin. A D.J. spins, rows of rainbow umbrellas suspended over the courtyard add a festive air, and the whole atmosphere is laid-back and fun. Lunch for two, around 800 pesos. If you’re traveling with children and want to run off some energy before lunch, one of the city’s many good parks, the Plaza Ángel Gris, is just one block north.

Backpacks made from parachutes, scrapbook workshops, block-printed makeup bags, linen jumpsuits, tarot readings: You’ll find all this under the roof of the Galería Patio del Liceo, a fabulously fun place on bustling Avenida Santa Fe. There’s a courtyard with tables and a coffee bar, and, one floor up, Bebé Vino, a small wine shop and bar stocked with adventurous bottles from offbeat producers, all picked by the co-owners, Martín Bruno, winner of too many prestigious sommelier awards to count, and his partner, Victoria García, an artist. They’ll open bottles for impromptu tastings or give you a glass of cordisco to drink as you wander around the shops, returning to pick up a few choice bottles to bring home.

Argentines love their soccer teams more than they love steak and complaining about the economy. Passions run so high that no alcohol is allowed at matches, and opposing team fans are banned from all regular league games in the city. But pounding drums, ribald chants, heartfelt songs and waving banners are part and parcel of every face-off between local teams like River Plate and Boca Juniors, and the games are always exciting. The Estadio Monumental Antonio Vespucio Liberti, a.k.a. El Monumental, is home to River, usually at the top of the league, but there are many local teams and games every week (days and times vary, check superliga.futbol for schedules). For the most important matches, tickets can only be bought by club members, so it’s often easiest to go with a group. Landing Pad BA organizes excursions with transport to and from meeting points, and pre-game drinks at a traditional spot. The local guides are die-hard football fans and are skilled at creating atmosphere. Packages start from around $100, including ticket.

The splashy dinner-and-a-show tango performances aimed at tourists are dramatic and, perhaps, over the top, but tango remains an important part of the city’s culture scene in less obvious ways. For a dose of authenticity, head to the Belgrano neighborhood to find the outdoor La Glorieta (no website, free admission), where couples of varying ages dance beneath the lights of an octagonal bandstand in the shadow of a high-rise apartment building. Women sit on the steps to change into their dedicated tango shoes before hitting the dance floor, while traditional tango songs fill the air. No one’s taking selfies; instead everyone just enjoys the air of romance and the long-established practice of exchanging coded looks that are part of finding a partner for the next dance.

Rather than “brunchear” in the North American style — so popular in Buenos Aires these days — take yourself instead to a “bar notable,” one of the city’s all-day cafes that have been around for a century or so. Bar de Cao is one of the most evocative, with scuffed tile floors, rickety wooden tables and chairs, and high windows and ceilings letting in light to illuminate the collection of art and memorabilia that has accumulated on the walls over the years. Clusters of salamis and ham hang from racks, and the bar is backed by rows and rows of wood-and-glass cabinets that are filled with dusty bottles. The menu of sandwiches, hot meals and snacks is gigantic. Now, perhaps in deference to changing times or tourists, they offer a small list of breakfast combos that include coffee, fresh orange juice, toast and even eggs — good if you want more than the typical Argentine breakfast of a coffee and a couple of medialunas (croissants). Breakfast for two, around 350 pesos.

The contemporary art scene in Buenos Aires is booming, with the arteBA art fair getting better every year, and plenty of galleries to check out (Ruth Benzecar and Nora Fisch, in particular, have interesting shows), but the grande dame of the art scene is still the MALBA (admission, 280 pesos) with its focus on Latin American art. This permanent collection is diverse and comprehensive, new exhibits are thought-provoking and there’s plenty of anticipation for what’s to come from the newly appointed artistic director, Gabriela Rangel. The shop sells great art books, a fun selection of ceramic housewares and beautiful leather bags by homegrown companies like Le Bas.

Sundays in Buenos Aires are quiet, with most shops and galleries closed, and locals usually spend their time enjoying a big lunch with friends or family. Create your own version of this at El Preferido de Palermo, an elegant high-ceilinged restaurant with old-fashioned accents that the owner, Pablo Rivera (also the owner of nearby Don Julio, the famous steakhouse that you have to book months in advance, or queue for hours), has chosen to retain, like the drafty wood-outlined windows and the tile floor. The emphasis here is on traditional Argentine dishes. Start with a plate of housemade charcuterie (seen hanging in the glass-walled “cava” at the back of the restaurant), follow it with a roasted fish with capers, or an umami bomb of a lentil stew, add a glass or two of an orange wine, finish with an espresso and a plate of light crepes with dulce de leche. Really, you could be in Buenos Aires in 1950 and not much would have been different, which is exactly the point — and the charm. Lunch for two, around 3,000 pesos.


Palermo is your best bet for accommodations — not only are there plenty of stylish restaurants and shops, but the neighborhood’s central location makes it easy to get to both the north and south of the city. Airbnb has plenty of apartments here; one-bedrooms start around $40 a night.

The one-time home of Francis Ford Coppola, Be Jardín Escondido (doubles from $180, including breakfast) is an elegant seven-room home turned charming small hotel. Gaucho-inspired touches like cowskin rugs and old-fashioned wooden wardrobes are complemented by a small pool and chic public spaces.

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Dezeen's top 10 innovative materials of 2019 – Dezeen

From lab-grown spider silk to cellulose, design and technology reporter Natashah Hitti continues our review of the year with 10 of the most interesting materials developed or used throughout 2019, with a particular focus on reuse.


Seaweed

As the climate crisis puts pressure on people to think twice about what they produce, many designers looked to algal forms like seaweed as a sustainable alternative to plastic and other materials.

Luisa Kahlfeldt and Jasmine Linington both used a fabric called SeaCell, composed of seaweed and eucalyptus, to create sustainable alternatives to disposable diapers and the materials used in couture fashion respectively.

Copenhagen School of Business and Design student Kathryn Larsen developed a way for seaweed to be used as prefab panelling or thatching, while this year’s London Marathon runners were offered edible seaweed drinks capsules in place of plastic bottles.


Spider silk

On the same eco-friendly streak, garments from vegan spider silk came to the fore this year. For example, biotech startup Spiber created the first commercially available jacket made from synthetic spider silk for The North Face.

Adidas and Stella McCartney also worked with Californian biotech startup Bolt Threads to recreate a version of the proteins found in spider silk in a laboratory, to form the “fully biodegradable” Biofabric Tennis Dress.


Responsive materials

Smart, adaptive materials have also been popular among designers. Fashion designer Ying Gao created a pair of autonomous, robotic dresses that respond to particular colours in their immediate surroundings by moving as if alive.

Similarly, Layer developed a smart material for aircraft seating that detects passengers’ needs, and researchers at the University of Maryland invented a responsive textile made from polymer fibres coated with carbon nanotubes that warms up the wearer when they’re cold and cools them down when they’re hot.


Animal byproducts

Despite vegan design being on the rise this year, some designers took a different stance by putting animal byproducts that would otherwise go to waste to use in their creations.

Danish designer Kathrine Barbro Bendixen used discarded cow intestines to make a series of sculptural lights, comprised of translucent tubes that twist around an LED fixture.

Shahar Livne also designed a pair of trainers with alternative leather inserts made of animal fat, bones and blood taken from waste streams of slaughterhouses, while Reykjavík studio At10 made a bioplastic meat packaging from the skin of the animal itself.


Cellulose

Another organic material that designers looked to this year was cellulose – an organic compound that gives plants their structure.

Meydan Levy developed a series of edible artificial fruits made up of 3D-printed cellulose skins that are filled with various vitamins and minerals, while Elena Amato used the compound to create sustainable cosmetics packaging.

Elissa Brunato developed a way of making iridescent sequins from cellulose extracted from trees. According to the designer, the cellulose’s crystalline form refracts light and makes the sequins naturally shimmery.


Cork

Cork was also a material on the rise this year, favoured by many designers and architects for its compostable and recyclable properties.

Matthew Barnett Howland, Dido Milne and Oliver Wilton built a house from cork blocks supported by timber components, designed in a way that it can be easily dismantled, reused or recycled, while Nimtim Architects used the material for the walls of a London house extension.

Portuguese studio Digitalab used an innovative cork thread to create a collection of lighting and accessories, and Jasper Morrison made a series of furniture items from cork block left over from wine-bottle cork-stopper production.


Tents and parachutes

An unusual but popular choice of items to save from landfill this year were tents and parachutes, typically made from nylon, which designers reused to make fashion and furniture pieces.

Graduate designers Chloe Baines and Tuo Lei both made fashion garments from tents left behind at music festivals, while design studio Layer created a series of chairs and screens from recycled, surplus ex-military parachutes and aircraft brake parachutes.


Coffee

Designers also came up with different ways to reuse waste coffee grounds, including Jamie Pybus, who developed a household system that uses leftover coffee grounds as a fertile medium for growing edible mushrooms.

Italian design studio High Society used discarded coffee bean peels to make a series of lamps, while Zhekai Zhang used the caffeinated material to create marble effects on porcelain lights.

Industrial design studio PriestmanGoode also replaced single-use plastic with coffee grounds and husks to make meal trays for long-haul flights.


Dezeen's top 10 emerging materials of 2019Dezeen's top 10 emerging materials of 2019

Bioplastic

The development of bioplastic alternatives to petroleum-based plastics continued to be at the forefront of designers’ minds this year.

British designer Lucy Hughes used fish waste to create a compostable bioplastic as an alternative to single-use packaging like bags and sandwich wrappers, and scooped the overall James Dyson Award for her efforts.

Designers have also utilised food waste to create bioplastics, such as Carlo Ratti’s juice cups made from orange peel, and Shellworks’ paper-like material made from discarded lobster shells.


Used clothing

With over 100 billion items of clothing produced each year, creatives have resorted to using old garments in product design as a way of keeping the surplus textiles from being thrown away.

Examples include Sophie Rowley, who took discarded denim jean offcuts and made them into a series of tables featuring mottled patterns similar to marble, and Harry Nuriev who filled a transparent vinyl sofa with worn and discarded Balenciaga clothing.

Dutch designer Simone Post also made a series of patterned rugs for sportswear giant Adidas by shredding the brand’s old sports trainers into granules.

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