Lab-grown dairy: The next food frontier – Phys.Org

Lab-grown dairy: The next food frontier
Could dairy products soon be produced in labs? Credit: Shutterstock

Lab-grown meat is getting a lot of attention along with plant-based meat substitutes. Technology is driving the industry toward providing alternatives to conventionally produced food products. Dairy proteins may be the next product produced in a lab, for use in fluid “milk” production and processed dairy products like yogurt and cheese, to name a few.

Winston Churchill predicted the rise of synthetic foods in 1931. “We shall escape the absurdity of growing a whole chicken in order to eat the breast or wing, by growing these parts separately under a suitable medium. Synthetic food will, of course, also be used in the future.”

While it took longer than 50 years, his prediction is coming true with meat proteins and now dairy proteins.

What is synthetic dairy?

Perfect Day Inc., a California-based start-up, has recreated the proteins found in conventional cow’s milk without the use of animals. The company developed a form of genetically modified microflora that produces both whey and casein through a fermentation process.

The approach can be loosely compared to the use of brewer’s yeast to produce alcohol. Yeast is used in controlled environments to create fermentation byproducts and the two processes simply employ different yeasts for a different purpose and output.

Perfect Day says their product is the exact same as the protein found in cow’s milk. Conventional milk is approximately 3.3 percent protein, of which 82 per is casein and 18 percent is whey. The other main elements are water, fat and carbohydrates.

Perfect Day has the technology to remake the small fraction of milk that is protein, arguably the most important component to produce other foods. The company suggests that its dairy protein is vegan and lactose-free, while providing the same high-quality nutrition as conventional dairy protein. This could have significant appeal for consumers.

Tough to mimic full-fat milks

Milk produced by dairy cattle is a versatile ingredient used in various products worldwide. More than 70 percent of milk sold from Canadian farms in 2019 is used for further processing, leaving the remainder to be consumed as fluid milk.

It may be difficult to produce full-fat milks that mimic the taste and texture of cow’s milk. Protein is just one component of fluid milk; milk fat is another, which would likely be the most difficult to mimic with plant-based alternatives. The structure of milk fat provides a specific taste and mouth feel when drinking milk, and this may be a tougher formulation challenge than creating proteins to be used in cheese or yogurt.

The early focus of Perfect Day’s communication was on fluid milk —the kind we drink —but the company has shifted its focus to processed products.

Perfect Day has partnered with food production powerhouse Archer Daniels Midland (ADM), among others, to move towards full-scale production. The company is one of the world’s largest agricultural processors and food ingredient providers with more than 330 manufacturing facilities in almost 200 countries. ADM supplies a vast list of ingredients for both human and animal consumption; synthetic dairy protein may be a perfect addition to their offerings.

Products such as yogurt and cheese are different than fluid milk, and may be more suitable for using lab-grown casein and whey. The synthetic proteins could be used to replace dairy milk ingredients or to complement them.

In yogurt production, for example, protein is often added to improve texture. There are differing proportions of milk components in various processed products. This means that fermented casein and whey proteins could augment or replace conventional protein ingredients. This is easier to do in products with high-protein ingredients.

That said, the potential use of animal-free dairy protein goes far beyond traditional dairy products such as cheese and yogurt. Hot dogs that contain milk powder and granola bars that contain modified milk ingredients are examples of the many foods that could use this alternative dairy protein.

Tackling malnutrition?

Perfect Day CEO Ryan Pandya said last year: “We began to look into how we can use our protein to prevent stunted growth and malnutrition in the developing world.” This suggests Perfect Day’s focus is on providing ingredients rather than producing milk.

Some products aren’t well-suited to this approach. Butter, for example, is made from milk fat and has almost no protein. We’ve long had a plant-based alternative to butter —margarine. But many consumers moved away from margarine and back to butter.

The Canadian per capita consumption of butter increased from 2.72 kilograms to 3.21 kilograms from 2007 to 2016. This increase in butter demand has led to an excess of milk protein in the marketplace in both Canada and the United States.

While it remains to be seen if these fermented proteins can be produced economically, their introduction into the marketplace could cause significant disruption to the dairy industry. The disruption would be due in part to switching some processed products away from conventional dairy proteins.

There would be additional disruption because of the change in relative demand for protein and other milk components. We would likely end up with more significant surpluses of proteins from both conventional dairy and synthetic production.

The future

Many issues need to be resolved before these products arrive in our supermarkets. The economics of production have to work. Products need to be reformulated to incorporate the fermented proteins with other ingredients to replace the milk components.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency currently describes milk as being produced by an animal. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not yet made a policy statement on classifying synthetic milk proteins.

Milk in Canada is also subject to a supply management system that includes quota for production.

Will synthetic casein and whey be subject to the same system? The regulatory environment will require significant clarification, and any changes will be vigorously debated by various interests.

Some consumers will highly value the fact that animals are not required to produce these proteins, creating a vegan, lactose-free product. There will also be a perception that synthetic dairy proteins will have a smaller environmental footprint.

Other consumers will likely have concerns that the proteins are produced using a genetically modified yeast.

Despite these uncertainties, we will likely see synthetic dairy products on grocery shelves within a few years.


Explore further

Confused about the term ‘soy milk’? FDA wants to know


Provided by
The Conversation

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.The Conversation

Citation:
Lab-grown dairy: The next food frontier (2019, June 12)
retrieved 12 June 2019
from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-lab-grown-dairy-food-frontier.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no
part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

This June Dairy Month, Learn To Separate Milk Myths From The Honest Truth – Yahoo Finance

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Raise a Toast to Milk This Summer &amp; Trust That You Can Always Count on Milk” data-reactid=”11″>Raise a Toast to Milk This Summer & Trust That You Can Always Count on Milk

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="SAN CLEMENTE, Calif., June 4, 2019 /PRNewswire/ –&nbsp;The California Milk Processor Board (CMPB), creators of the iconic got milk?&nbsp;campaign, is celebrating June Dairy Month by partnering with leading health expert and best-selling author Dr. Nina Shapiro&nbsp;in an effort to dispel milk myths in today’s "mis" information era and help California consumers better understand the benefits of one of the original, farm-to-table super foods – real, wholesome dairy milk.” data-reactid=”12″>SAN CLEMENTE, Calif., June 4, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — The California Milk Processor Board (CMPB), creators of the iconic got milk? campaign, is celebrating June Dairy Month by partnering with leading health expert and best-selling author Dr. Nina Shapiro in an effort to dispel milk myths in today’s “mis” information era and help California consumers better understand the benefits of one of the original, farm-to-table super foods – real, wholesome dairy milk.

California Milk Processor Board (PRNewsfoto/California Milk Processor Board)California Milk Processor Board (PRNewsfoto/California Milk Processor Board)
California Milk Processor Board (PRNewsfoto/California Milk Processor Board)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content=""This June, we want Californians to be armed with the right knowledge in order to make informed decisions about their health," said Steve James, executive director of the CMPB.&nbsp; "And that includes real wholesome dairy milk, the original farm-to-table food that comes from California cows."” data-reactid=”24″>”This June, we want Californians to be armed with the right knowledge in order to make informed decisions about their health,” said Steve James, executive director of the CMPB.  “And that includes real wholesome dairy milk, the original farm-to-table food that comes from California cows.”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The ongoing quest for a healthful lifestyle has many consumers chasing the latest trends found on social media, as well as overspending on costly processed beverages that simply didn't exist 10 years ago.&nbsp; Much of what's driving consumers choices today in the supermarket aisles is a growing fear factor driven by click-bait headlines instead of real nutritional facts. Take, for instance real wholesome dairy milk.&nbsp; All-natural dairy milk offers a range of healthful benefits&nbsp;including nine essential nutrients including high-quality protein to help build and maintain lean muscle, B vitamins for energy, vitamin A for a healthy immune system, potassium to regulate the balance of fluids in the body and bone building nutrients including calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D.&nbsp; Moreover, milk offers affordable great tasting natural hydration, never with any added sugar, hormones or antibiotics, and helps promotes a good night’s sleep.” data-reactid=”25″>The ongoing quest for a healthful lifestyle has many consumers chasing the latest trends found on social media, as well as overspending on costly processed beverages that simply didn’t exist 10 years ago.  Much of what’s driving consumers choices today in the supermarket aisles is a growing fear factor driven by click-bait headlines instead of real nutritional facts. Take, for instance real wholesome dairy milk.  All-natural dairy milk offers a range of healthful benefits including nine essential nutrients including high-quality protein to help build and maintain lean muscle, B vitamins for energy, vitamin A for a healthy immune system, potassium to regulate the balance of fluids in the body and bone building nutrients including calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D.  Moreover, milk offers affordable great tasting natural hydration, never with any added sugar, hormones or antibiotics, and helps promotes a good night’s sleep.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="That's the advice of Harvard and Cornell-educated physician, and mom, Nina Shapiro, M.D.&nbsp; Separating the truth from the many myths and trends in today’s "mis" information era is one of the concerns that Dr. Shapiro addresses in her practice, as well as from friends, acquaintances and parents.&nbsp; In her work as a surgeon and professor, Dr. Shapiro author of Hype, a Doctor’s Guide to Medical Myths, Exaggerated Claims and Bad Advice&nbsp;– How to Tell What’s Real and What’s Not, strives to guide her patients and their families to make informed decisions about their health.&nbsp;” data-reactid=”26″>That’s the advice of Harvard and Cornell-educated physician, and mom, Nina Shapiro, M.D.  Separating the truth from the many myths and trends in today’s “mis” information era is one of the concerns that Dr. Shapiro addresses in her practice, as well as from friends, acquaintances and parents.  In her work as a surgeon and professor, Dr. Shapiro author of Hype, a Doctor’s Guide to Medical Myths, Exaggerated Claims and Bad Advice – How to Tell What’s Real and What’s Not, strives to guide her patients and their families to make informed decisions about their health. 

According to Dr. Shapiro, the many myths today that are upheld by popular public wisdom and perpetuated by today’s culture of pseudo-news are doing more harm than good.  “It’s very important in today’s internet-driven, informational culture that consumers learn to separate fact from fiction when it comes to understanding the benefits that comes from dairy milk versus plant-based alternative, processed varieties,” said Dr. Shapiro.  “What’s needed is evidence-based common sense and a bit of expert guidance in order for consumers to become more empowered and more well-informed.”

Dr. Shapiro’s top six milk myths include:

  • Myth: Drinking milk leads to respiratory infections, including colds, coughs, and ear infections. Fact: No existing evidence supports this. The only time this may be even remotely related is if an infant or child were to drink a bottle of milk in the crib, in the middle of the night. But this would be the case for any food or drink being eaten, except for water.
  • Myth: Consuming milk or dairy products slows healing after tonsillectomy or during sore throats. Fact: This is absolutely not true. One of the fun side-benefits of kids getting their tonsils removed is that they get to eat ice cream, and drink milk smoothies during recovery. In fact, the more kids consume, especially liquids containing protein and vitamins, the faster they’ll heal.
  • Myth: Milk causes weight gain and can cause cancer. Fact: Not true. Much of the rise of obesity is partly due to increased processed foods/fast foods/fried foods/convenience foods, and decreased exercise and activity, even beginning in childhood. Drinking milk is filling and has no direct correlation with weight gain (1,3). As far as cancers go, no diet study can show direct cause, only correlation. There is no consistent data from any study showing that dairy increases risks of any type of cancer.
  • Myth: Dairy is bad for your heart. Fact: Actually, the complete opposite is true. The PURE (Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology) study, recently published in The Lancet, looked at nearly 150,000 adults from 21 countries and five continents with respect to dairy intake and heart disease over a nine-year period (2). They found that subjects who consumed greater than two servings per day of dairy products versus those who consumed no dairy products had lower risk of heart-related disease, as well as a lower risk of death overall. In particular, milk, of all dairy products resulted in the lowest risks in this study. Interestingly, subjects who consumed whole-fat milk were the healthiest.
  • Myth: Diabetics should avoid dairy products. Fact: A recent large meta-analysis study, looking at up to 500,000 adults ranging from ages 20 to 88 years, found that higher amounts of dairy consumption correlated to lower incidence of type 2 diabetes (4). This was most notable for total dairy product consumption, low-fat dairy consumption, and yogurt. Overall, the higher amount of dairy product consumed correlated to lower and lower risks of type 2 diabetes.
  • Myth: I have lactose intolerance, so it must be a milk allergy. Fact: Lactase is an enzyme that helps break down one of the sugars in milk (lactose) during digestion. Some people have lower amounts of this; often drinking a little less is the answer. There are also lactose-free milk products, or tablets to ingest which contain lactase, making milk digestion easier. But this is NOT an allergy. True milk allergies, with vomiting, rashes, and even anaphylaxis, affect less than one percent of the adult population (5).

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="About Dr. Nina Shapiro
Dr. Nina Shapiro is one of America’s leading physicians and has more than two decades of experience in clinical and academic medicine and her recent book, Hype: A Doctor’s Guide to Medical Myths, tackles the latest health fads and misconceptions.&nbsp; Dr. Shapiro is a graduate of Harvard Medical School and Cornell University, she completed her surgical residency at Harvard and finished additional subspecialty training in pediatric otolaryngology at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London and the Children’s Hospital of San Diego. She is the "go-to physician" in Los Angeles and around the world, as many international patients seek her out for treatment of challenging cases that can’t be resolved in their own countries.&nbsp; She works with patients and families to guide them in making decisions every day about their health. Dr. Shapiro has regularly provided professional insight and commentary for CBS’s "The Early Show," "Extra," and "The Doctors," when there’s a controversial health study or a medical story in the news.&nbsp; Her work has also been featured and published in the Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Prevention, and many other print and online publications. (http://drninashapiro.com/curriculum-vitae).” data-reactid=”36″>About Dr. Nina Shapiro
Dr. Nina Shapiro is one of America’s leading physicians and has more than two decades of experience in clinical and academic medicine and her recent book, Hype: A Doctor’s Guide to Medical Myths, tackles the latest health fads and misconceptions.  Dr. Shapiro is a graduate of Harvard Medical School and Cornell University, she completed her surgical residency at Harvard and finished additional subspecialty training in pediatric otolaryngology at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London and the Children’s Hospital of San Diego. She is the “go-to physician” in Los Angeles and around the world, as many international patients seek her out for treatment of challenging cases that can’t be resolved in their own countries.  She works with patients and families to guide them in making decisions every day about their health. Dr. Shapiro has regularly provided professional insight and commentary for CBS’s “The Early Show,” “Extra,” and “The Doctors,” when there’s a controversial health study or a medical story in the news.  Her work has also been featured and published in the Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Prevention, and many other print and online publications. (http://drninashapiro.com/curriculum-vitae).

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="About the CMPB
Since 1993, the California Milk Processor Board (CMPB), creator of the famous got milk? campaign, remains dedicated to increasing milk consumption throughout California. Its latest multi-platform multicultural campaign, You Can Always Count on Milk, captures today’s children facing daily challenges and powering through it all with milk as their trusted drink of choice before, during and after a long day. As of July 2018, the CMPB features a newly revamped website offering millennial families with the fun takes on how they can rely on milk, nutritional advice for a healthier lifestyle, and a variety of ways to incorporate milk into easy-to-make recipes they can try at home. The CMPB is funded by all&nbsp;California&nbsp;milk processors and administered by the California Department of Food and Agriculture.&nbsp;The got milk? trademark is a federally registered trademark and service mark. For more information, visit&nbsp;www.gotmilk.com.” data-reactid=”41″>About the CMPB
Since 1993, the California Milk Processor Board (CMPB), creator of the famous got milk? campaign, remains dedicated to increasing milk consumption throughout California. Its latest multi-platform multicultural campaign, You Can Always Count on Milk, captures today’s children facing daily challenges and powering through it all with milk as their trusted drink of choice before, during and after a long day. As of July 2018, the CMPB features a newly revamped website offering millennial families with the fun takes on how they can rely on milk, nutritional advice for a healthier lifestyle, and a variety of ways to incorporate milk into easy-to-make recipes they can try at home. The CMPB is funded by all California milk processors and administered by the California Department of Food and Agriculture. The got milk? trademark is a federally registered trademark and service mark. For more information, visit www.gotmilk.com.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Sources:” data-reactid=”42″>Sources:

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="1:&nbsp; Food Nutr Res.&nbsp;2016 Nov 22;60:32527. doi: 10.3402/fnrv60.32527. eCollection 2016, Milk and dairy products: good or bad for human health? An assessment of the totality of scientific evidence, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27882862″ data-reactid=”43″>1:  Food Nutr Res. 2016 Nov 22;60:32527. doi: 10.3402/fnrv60.32527. eCollection 2016, Milk and dairy products: good or bad for human health? An assessment of the totality of scientific evidence, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27882862

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="2. Lancet.&nbsp;2018 Nov 24;392(10161):2288-2297. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31812-9. Epub 2018 Sep 11. Association of dairy intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality in 21 countries from five continents (PURE): a prospective cohort study.&nbsp; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30217460″ data-reactid=”44″>2. Lancet. 2018 Nov 24;392(10161):2288-2297. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31812-9. Epub 2018 Sep 11. Association of dairy intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality in 21 countries from five continents (PURE): a prospective cohort study.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30217460

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="3. Adv Nutr.&nbsp;2019 May 1;10(suppl_2):S67-S73. doi: 10.1093/advances/nmz020. Introduction and Executive Summary of the Supplement, Role of Milk and Dairy Products in Health and Prevention of Noncommunicable Chronic Diseases: A Series of Systematic Reviews.&nbsp;https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31089742&nbsp;” data-reactid=”45″>3. Adv Nutr. 2019 May 1;10(suppl_2):S67-S73. doi: 10.1093/advances/nmz020. Introduction and Executive Summary of the Supplement, Role of Milk and Dairy Products in Health and Prevention of Noncommunicable Chronic Diseases: A Series of Systematic Reviews. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31089742 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="4. Adv Nutr.&nbsp;2019 May 1;10(suppl_2):S154-S163. doi: 10.1093/advances/nmy107, Effects of Milk and Dairy Product Consumption on Type 2 Diabetes: Overview of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31089734 &nbsp;&nbsp;” data-reactid=”46″>4. Adv Nutr. 2019 May 1;10(suppl_2):S154-S163. doi: 10.1093/advances/nmy107, Effects of Milk and Dairy Product Consumption on Type 2 Diabetes: Overview of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31089734   

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="5. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma &amp; Immunology. 2017. Prevalence of food allergies and intolerance documented in electronic health records. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28577971″ data-reactid=”47″>5. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. 2017. Prevalence of food allergies and intolerance documented in electronic health records. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28577971

 

Cision

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="View original content to download multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/this-june-dairy-month-learn-to-separate-milk-myths-from-the-honest-truth-300861475.html” data-reactid=”60″>View original content to download multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/this-june-dairy-month-learn-to-separate-milk-myths-from-the-honest-truth-300861475.html

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="span.prnews_spanfont-size:8pt !important;font-family:"Arial" !important;color:black !important; a.prnews_acolor:blue !important; li.prnews_lifont-size:8pt !important;font-family:"Arial" !important;color:black !important; p.prnews_pfont-size:0.62em !important;font-family:"Arial" !important;color:black !important;margin:0in !important; ;} ” data-reactid=”61″>span.prnews_spanfont-size:8pt !important;font-family:”Arial” !important;color:black !important; a.prnews_acolor:blue !important; li.prnews_lifont-size:8pt !important;font-family:”Arial” !important;color:black !important; p.prnews_pfont-size:0.62em !important;font-family:”Arial” !important;color:black !important;margin:0in !important; ;}

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Fairview’s Kennedy named Williamson County 4-H June Dairy Month chairman – The Tennessean

Leah Kennedy has been named the 2019 June Dairy Month Chairman for Williamson County.

Kennedy, a Fairview High School student, will be honored May 30 at the Tennessee June Dairy Month Kickoff Event at Battle Mountain Farm in College Grove. The event includes recognition from Celeste Blackburn, president of the American Dairy Association of Tennessee.

The official kickoff celebration recognizes Tennessee 4-H members’ efforts to promote June Dairy Month in Tennessee. The event is co-sponsored by The Dairy Alliance, 4-H and the Tennessee Farm Bureau.

June Dairy Month activities are designed to communicate the value of milk and other dairy products to Tennessee consumers. Chairpersons play a vital role in spreading dairy’s message in their communities.

“The dairy industry is important to me because sometimes the benefits of dairy are overlooked. It is vital for people to know how important dairy is to us. Farmers worker extremely hard to make sure we have fresh dairy and, many times, they do not receive the recognition they deserve,” Kennedy said. “June Dairy Month Chairman means promoting dairy in a positive manner and being a role model for the industry. It also means sharing the information I learn.”

Kennedy, a freshman at Fairview High, is the daughter of Les and Lisa Kennedy. Leah is the Williamson County Junior Fair Board Secretary and is active in public speaking and theater and voice activities. She is a member of Rotary Club, National Beta Club, Youth in Government and her school’s Dance Team and Tennis Team.

Leah is an active member of her 4-H chapter, participating in performing arts, communications and photography projects. She is a member of All Stars and the Honor Club. Kennedy has won demonstration awards at county and regional levels. She also competes in public speaking and portfolio contests.

“We wish Leah much success in her role of communicating the nutritional benefits of milk and dairy products to the people in Williamson County,” said American Dairy Association of Tennessee president Celeste Blackburn. “Leah will appreciate the cooperation of the people there. Her interest and enthusiasm will result in a better informed community from which all will benefit.”

Originally deemed “National Milk Month” by American grocers in 1937, National Dairy Month began to promote dairy consumption during peak milk production in the summer.

In 2016, there were an estimated 42,000 Tennessee dairy cows living on 300 dairy farms producing 81 million gallons, or approximately 696 million pounds, of milk. The top six milk producing Tennessee counties were: Loudon, Monroe, Bradley, Bedford, McMinn and Washington.

This year’s theme, “Dairy is in Our DNA,” encourages families to make milk their first beverage choice due to its unique package of vitamins, minerals and nutrients that are an essential part of a healthy diet. With local media and farm bureaus, dairy farmers will be working alongside The Dairy Alliance to engage consumers through social media, radio contests, T-shirt giveaways, events and more.

For more information on how you can celebrate June Dairy Month, visit online at www.thedairyalliance.com/june-dairy-month/.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Which Dairy Products are Impacted by Chinese Tariffs? – Dairy Herd Management

The trade war between the U.S. and China hit new highs recently when China announced additional tariffs on more than $60 billion of U.S. goods. U.S. dairy products were not immune to the tariffs imposed last summer, and it appears that they were not left out of the wide swath cut by this new round tariffs either. However, it appears that little has changed from previous tariff announcements. 

“Just lactose, infant formula, and casein are being hit with higher retaliatory tariffs,” says Nate Donnay, director of dairy market insight with INTL FCStone. “Retaliatory tariffs on the other major products are unchanged.”

Below is a list of products and expected tariffs, generated from information provided in a USDA GAIN Report:

Tariff Rate and Implementation Date
Product Description Jan 1, 2019 June 1, 2019 Total Applied Tariff, June 1, 2019        
Milk & Cream, Fat less than or equal to 1%, Not Concentrated or Sweetened 15% N/A 40%
Milk & Cream, 1% 15% N/A 40%
Milk & Cream, 6% 15% N/A 40%
Milk & Cream, Fat >10%, Not Concentrated or Sweetened 15% 25% 40%
Milk & Cream in Solid Forms, Fat less than or equal to 1.5% 10% 25%

35%

Milk & Cream In Solid Forms of >1.5% Fat, Concentrated 10% 25% 35%
Milk & Cream Not In Solid Form, Concentrated, Unsweetened 10% 25%

35%

Milk & Cream Not In Solid Form, Concentrated, Sweetened 10% 25%

35%

Yogurt 10% 25%

35%

Buttermilk, Curdled/Fermented/Acidified Milk & Cream 20% 25%

45%

Whey and Modified Whey 6% 25%

31%

Products Consisting of Natural Milk Constituents 20% 25% 45%
Butter 10% 25% 35%
Dairy Spreads 10% 25% 35%
Other Fats & Oils Derived From Milk 10% 25% 35%
Fresh Cheese, Including Whey Cheese, Curd 12% 25% 37%
Grated or Powdered Cheese 8% 25% 33%
Processed Cheese, Not Grated or Powdered 8% 25% 33%
Blue-Veined Cheese, Other-Veined Cheese Product 8% 25% 33%
Cheese, Nes 8% 25% 33%

While China has imported a significant amount of dairy products during the first quarter of 2019, the U.S. has been largely left out of the market. This is due to Chinese tariffs imposed on U.S. goods last summer. Since the tariffs went into effect in July 2018, the U.S. Dairy Export Council says dairy volume to China has fallen 43%. 

U.S. Dairy Exports to China Plummet 43% After New Tariffs
Product July 2017 March 2018 (Pre-Tariffs) July 2018-March 2019 (With Tariffs) %Change
Whey 204,374 99,767 -51%
Lactose 66,622 60,698 -9%
SMP 21,546 7,183 -67%
Cheese 13,752 7,042 -45%
Other 27,973 15,389 -45%
Total 334,267 190,079 -43%

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Big dairy out to milk alternative revenue | Business | Journal Gazette – Fort Wayne Journal Gazette

Dairy farmers are indignant about beverages calling themselves milks when they are actually made of oats or almonds or sunflower seeds. Even worse, these impostors have been draining away at the market share of what cows produce.

But if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em. While farmers loudly voice their complaints about alt-dairy products, conventional processors are starting to churn them out alongside traditional milk, aiming to cash in on their fast-growing popularity in the U.S.

One of the country’s oldest dairies, HP Hood, has released a product called Planet Oat. The giant dairy-cooperative Organic Valley is the distributor for a line of almond drinks made by New Barn Organics, and a dairy processor handles the packing.

“We wouldn’t exist without Organic Valley,” said Ted Robb, chief executive officer of New Barn, which makes the almond drinks and other nut-based products, including what it calls a buttery spread. “They have a very hard time calling it milk. That really, really bothers them. But they do understand we’re thinking the same way around organic and deeper values.”

For the dairy industry, though, the value that matters most comes from the cow-based products they sell. Americans are drinking 40% less milk than in 1975, and prices have suffered a rout. The downturn has been a near-deadly blow to stalwarts like Dean Foods Co., the top U.S. dairy company that has been forced to weigh a sale.

Meanwhile, the plant alternatives are hot. Sales of alt-milks were up 8% in the year through Jan. 26, hitting $1.7 billion, according to data from Nielsen. Plant-based cheeses and yogurts, while a smaller category, are seeing even bigger gains. Beyond Meat Inc., the maker of vegan burgers and sausages, surged 163% on its May 2 trading debut – the biggest U.S. listing since at least 2008 among initial public offerings that raised at least $200 million.

Outwardly, the dairy industry has harsh words for the plant-based competitors eating into their profits.

The National Milk Producers Federation is fired up about the Dairy Pride Act, legislation introduced in the Senate to force the Food and Drug Administration to police labels. In public comments to the FDA last September, yogurt-maker Chobani said using dairy terms on labels for plant-based alternatives was “improper,” “illegal” and “poses a public health risk.”

But dairy producers can’t help but get in on the zeitgeist. Chobani recently launched coconut-based non-dairy products. Notably, though, the products aren’t labeled as “yogurt.”

The new products aren’t “a replacement to dairy –dairy and yogurt aren’t ever going to be replaced,” the Chobani said in a statement.

Even dairy icon Dean is in the plant business and owns almost 70% of Good Karma Foods, a maker of flaxseed milk and yogurt.

“Plant-based becomes a cool opportunity to diversify our portfolio so we can be more relevant to consumers,” said Marissa Jarratt, senior vice president at Dean Foods.

“We want consumers to have options they can choose from,” she said.

For HP Hood, one of America’s oldest dairies at 170 years old, the “horse is out of the barn” when it comes to labeling, said Chris Ross, vice president of marketing.

“Consumers still have a relationship with dairy, but at same time, their relationship with plant-based like almond isn’t going to end anytime soon,” Ross said.

Michele Simon, executive director at the Plant Based Foods Association, said while it looks like there’s a fight on the surface, there’s an embracing of milk alternatives by traditional dairy companies because, particularly for processors, it’s “a huge economic opportunity.”

“From a processor perspective, they don’t care what goes into the cartons, they just want the cartons filled,” she said.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

UTIA Dairy Products Evaluation Team Ranked First in the Nation – Hoard's Dairyman

The information below has been supplied by dairy marketers and other industry organizations. It has not been edited, verified or endorsed by Hoard’s Dairyman.

A talented group of students from the University of Tennessee Herbert College of Agriculture returned from a dairy competition with high honors, celebrating an entire semester of preparation and hard work. The Dairy Products Evaluation Team recently won several categories at the 97th Annual Collegiate Dairy Products Evaluation Contest held in Madison, Wisconsin.

The annual competition is open to collegiate teams of students from across the nation, and students compete in six different dairy categories, butter, cheddar, cottage cheese, milk, yogurt and ice cream. This year’s competition included 15 teams from various colleges and universities.

In the team award judging, UT students placed first in cottage cheese, yogurt and milk; second place in butter, cheddar and ice cream; and first in the overall competition. Food science students Bailey Brown, Quint Gasque, Anita Best and Josh Brantley also participated in individual competitions. Brown placed first in cottage cheese, and second in both cheddar and ice cream, while Gasque placed second in yogurt. In the individual scores overall, Bailey Brown took first, Quint Gasque second, and Anita Best placed fifth in the nation.

“The students worked very hard this year, with sensory tests multiple times a week at 7 a.m.,” says Charles White, team coach and an adjunct professor in the Department of Food Science.

UT Dairy Products Evaluation Team

Team members include Anita Best (a senior from Cookeville, Tennessee), Joshua Brantley (a junior from Oak Ridge, Tennessee), Bailey Brown (a senior from Milan, Tennessee), Quint Gasque (a junior from Kingston, Tennessee), McKayla Henley (a senior from Decherd, Tennessee), Meryam Idrissi (a senior from Knoxville, Tennessee), and Grant Wallen (a senior from Seymour, Tennessee). Allison Shaunak, a senior from Memphis, Tennessee, served as assistant coach.

Through its mission of research, teaching and extension, the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture touches lives and provides Real. Life. Solutions. ag.tennessee.edu.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Battling tariffs, drought and milk substitutes, Arizona dairy farmers expand their global reach – Arizona Daily Star

[unable to retrieve full-text content]

Battling tariffs, drought and milk substitutes, Arizona dairy farmers expand their global reach  Arizona Daily Star

PHOENIX — Dairy farmers in Arizona are dealing with challenges brought by tariffs and competition from alternative milk products, such as almond and soy milk, …

Source link

USMCA Passage Critical to Preserve and Strengthen Dairy Export Markets – Hoard's Dairyman

The information below has been supplied by dairy marketers and other industry organizations. It has not been edited, verified or endorsed by Hoard’s Dairyman.

The U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) released an economic analysis of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) today and dairy industry officials eager to see USMCA’s passage welcomed this key step in the trade agreement approval process.

Tom Vilsack, president and CEO of the U.S. Dairy Export Council, said the ITC study is important because it moves the USMCA process closer to ratification, a step urgently needed to secure trading conditions with Mexico and usher in the improvements the agreement makes for U.S. exports.

“We shipped $1.4 billion in dairy products to Mexico last year, which accounts for more than one-fourth of U.S. dairy exports,” he said. “Without a trade treaty with Mexico in place, the dairy industry would be hard pressed to maintain and expand these sales, as our competitors in Europe are expected to implement a lucrative new trade arrangement with Mexico by next year. Moreover, without USMCA we lose out on the new rules this deal puts in place such as key reforms to Canada’s dairy system. Congress must pass USMCA to shore up our market in Mexico and harness the gains made in other areas through USMCA.”

In addition to increases in tariff-rate quota access for dairy products to the Canadian market, Canada will remove a controversial milk pricing scheme that disadvantaged American businesses, impose new disciplines on its dairy pricing programs and Mexico will update the way it treats imports of common-name food products like parmesan and swiss cheeses that could face trade roadblocks.

“When examining USMCA’s benefit to the economy, we believe it is important to keep the full picture in mind of what’s at stake here,” explained Jim Mulhern the president and CEO of the National Milk Producers Federation. “USDA recently reported that our country lost an average of seven dairy farms a day in 2018 due to the poor economic conditions in rural America. That’s a startling number, and reversing this alarming trend is what we should be discussing. USMCA helps put us on a path to doing that by safeguarding our largest export market and instituting valuable new improvements to dairy trade in North America.”

The benefits of USMCA expand far beyond just dairy; the Food & Agriculture Dialogue on Trade also summarized the value of the agreement and the proper lens through which to examine the ITC report’s results. That document lays out why American Agriculture needs passage of USMCA noting for instance that: “uncertainty about NAFTA’s future threatens the North American market integration that has created and supports jobs for many U.S. food and agriculture producers.”

The National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF), based in Arlington, Va., develops and carries out policies that advance the well-being of U.S. dairy producers and the cooperatives they collectively own. The members of NMPF’s cooperatives produce the majority of the U.S, milk supply, making NMPF the voice of nearly 32,000 dairy producers on Capitol Hill and with government agencies. For more on NMPF’s activities, visit www.nmpf.org.

The U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) is a non-profit, independent membership organization that represents the global trade interests of U.S. dairy producers, proprietary processors and cooperatives, ingredient suppliers and export traders. Its mission is to enhance U.S. global competitiveness and assist the U.S. industry to increase its global dairy ingredient sales and exports of U.S. dairy products. USDEC accomplishes this through programs in market development that build global demand for U.S. dairy products, resolve market access barriers and advance industry trade policy goals. USDEC is supported by staff across the United States and overseas in Mexico, South America, Asia, Middle East and Europe. The U.S. Dairy Export Council prohibits discrimination on the basis of age, disability, national origin, race, color, religion, creed, gender, sexual orientation, political beliefs, marital status, military status, and arrest or conviction record.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Haifa Company Allegedly Selling Tainted Dairy Products [VIDEO & PHOTOS] – Yeshiva World News

The Israel Police, in cooperation with the Tax Authority and the Ministry of Health, uncovered a company in the Haifa area that falsified and marketed expired dairy products. The owner of the company was arrested.

The company is accused of “recycling” expired milk products, forging expiration dates and then selling their goods to shopping centers in the northern district.

Police together with the enforcement authorities of the Ministry of Health and the Tax Authority, entered the dairy company and detained five suspects for questioning (dairy owners and workers). They seized relevant evidence, including the products marketed and a printing machine. They are suspected of printing ‘amended’ expiration dates. Law enforcement agents also seized a truck loaded with suspicious goods which was suspected of being distributed among the various food outlets.

Representatives of the various units operating on the scene seized and confiscated tens of thousands of products suspected of being unsuitable for consumption which will all be destroyed.

[embedded content]

(YWN Israel Desk – Jerusalem)

Previous articleWATCH: Terror-Supporting Neturei Karta Protest Kalman Yeger At City Hall On Tuesday
Next articleThe Freedom To Choose

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link