Lawsuit Says Oregon Group Falsely Advertises Dairy Products – Claims Journal

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SALEM, Ore. — A class-action lawsuit claims that an Oregon creamery association falsely advertises the source of its milk, a report said.

The lawsuit was filed by the Animal Legal Defense Fund against the Tillamook County Creamery Association in western Oregon, The Statesman Journal reported Monday.

The lawsuit by the California-based organization said most of the association’s milk comes from Threemile Canyon Farms in Boardman rather than from cows grazing on coastal family farms.

The lawsuit filed Monday in Multnomah County Circuit Court lists four Oregon consumers from various parts of the state as plaintiffs and seeks an injunction against misleading advertising, and monetary relief.

The association’s dairy products are “made from milk from the largest industrial dairy in the country that confines tens of thousands of cows on concrete in the desert of eastern Oregon,” the complaint said.

“The Tillamook County Creamery Association adamantly disagrees with the allegations made in the lawsuit and we will aggressively defend ourselves,” said Tori Harms, corporate communications director.

The association is owned by about 80 families, Harms said.

Much of the association’s milk has come from at least five dairies near Boardman, 163 miles (262 kilometers) east of Portland.

The three largest dairies are owned by Threemile, which has 70,000 animals. Also known as Columbia River Dairy, Threemile has a 145-square-mile (376-square-kilometer) farming operation where manure from the cows is used as fertilizer, the newspaper reported.

The plaintiffs purchased Tillamook products believing they were sourced from pasture-based farms in Tillamook County and were willing to pay more based on the company’s advertising, the lawsuit said.

Information from the Salem Statesman-Journal.

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Impact of US trade war on Idaho dairy farmers – 6 On Your Side

KUNA, Idaho — The dairy industry is struggling in the United States — especially since the beginning of the U.S. trade war. To help alleviate some of the struggle, the feds announced they would be giving

$24 million

to Idaho farmers, but those farmers say that money doesn’t even begin to cover what they’ve lost.

The U.S. trade war began after President Trump launched investigations into trading affairs with other countries. Trump said the investigations revealed that China was engaging in unfair trading practices, and because of that, he announced he would be putting tariffs on certain products imported to the U.S. from China.

China retaliated by placing tariffs on items imported to China from the U.S. — dairy products are one of those items.

Those taking the direct impact, are dairy farmers; including Ted Vander Schaaf, a Kuna dairy farmer who has been running his dairy for twenty years, today.

“The economy is running at a pretty high pace right now. Construction is flying, especially in Southern Idaho here, and you see a lot of guys moving and getting a lot of things done right now. Unfortunately agriculture, we’re like almost in a recession right now, its not been good for a while.”

Vander Schaaf referenced the Great Recession; from that point, the dairy industry, just like everyone else, tried to climb out of the financial mess they were left in.

“(20)14 we had a really good year,” said Vander Schaaf.

Then, Russia imposed an embargo on agricultural products from Europe, which pushed more agricultural products into the rest of the world, creating greater supply than demand.

“Into (20)15, milk prices dropped pretty hard. (20)15 was softening, (20)16 was soft, (20)17 was not real great, and so we’ve been on like a 4 year slide as it is,” said Vander Schaaf.

Then into 2018, the trade war begins, after President Trump launched those investigations into trading affairs with other countries and placed tariffs on Chinese imports, which was followed by the retaliatory tariffs China placed on U.S. imports, including dairy products.

That means the United States has to pay more to export dairy products to China, which means the products are more expensive when they hit the shelves. Because of that, Chinese people buy less of the product, which pushes dairy products back into the U.S., creating a greater supply here.

“We’re exporting 15 percent or so of our national dairy products overseas and so we are impacted by trade wars,” said Vander Schaaf.

And it’s not just China, but Mexico as well. The two countries are the largest exporters for dairy.

So from there, the decline in revenue for the dairy industry began. Then recently, to help alleviate those financial losses, the United States Department of Agriculture announced they would be paying

$24 million to Idaho farms and dairies

.

“It’s only going to make up maybe a half a percent of that shortfall or one percent. I’m still sitting here with 15 percent of a problem, you know, that I don’t know how to make up,” said Vander Schaaf.

Vander Schaaf said he is hopeful that the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, once finalized, will create more balanced trade, at least with those countries.

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Novozymes develops online calculator to help dairies develop products with less sugar – DairyReporter.com

Dr Craig Sherwin, technical service manager at Novozymes, said, “Dairies are under increased pressure to find innovative ways of reducing the sugar in their products. Of course, that’s a task easier said than done. That’s why we created a new online calculator to estimate the potential to reduce added sugar in dairy products when using lactase.”

With diseases like obesity and type 2 diabetes on the rise, healthier eating is a topic on the minds of consumers and public health authorities the world over. People want reduced calories in their dairy products, but they’re not eager to compromise on the tastes and texture.

Novozymes created Saphera, an enzyme solution that boosts sweetness and allows dairies to use less sugar in their formulations, as well as production of a wide range of lactose-free products, including milk and fermented dairy products such as yogurt.

Less sugar – but still sweet

For dairy producers, taking sweetness into account is especially important when reformulating products. Lactose, for instance, is not particularly sweet on its own. But, when broken down with the lactase Saphera into glucose and galactose, the resulting sugars become almost 50% sweeter. That means dairies can achieve the sweetness that consumers love – with less added sugar or sweetener.

“We know it can be a big step for dairies to change their formulations to use less sugar while keeping the same sweetness. But, with the right tools, it’s possible to meet this consumer demand. Using lactase as a foundation to a toolkit approach for reduced added sugar can strike the right balance,”​ Sherwin said.

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Ukraine gets permission to export dairy products to Japan – Kyiv Post


Farmers prepare cows for milking at farm on Oct. 13, 2015.

Photo by Volodymyr Petrov

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Ukraine has been included in the list of countries from which exports of milk and dairy products (including butter and cheese) to Japan are allowed.

The relevant information is posted on the website of the State Service of Ukraine on Food Safety and Consumers’ Rights Protection.

In addition, requirements for exports of milk and/or dairy products to Japan are available on the website of the agency.

As reported, at the end of June 2019, the State Service of Ukraine on Food Safety and Consumers’ Rights Protection and the competent authority of Saudi Arabia agreed on the form of an international veterinary certificate for exports of milk and dairy products to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

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This $20 ice cream is made with dairy grown in lab—and it sold out immediately – CNBC

Agri-tech start-up, Perfect Day, released a line of real ice cream made with lab-grown dairy that costs $20 a pint on Thursday — and it sold out in hours.

“We were completely blown away by the response,” co-founder Perumal Gandhi tells CNBC Make It.

Perfect Day’s cultured dairy is created by taking cow’s milk DNA and adding it to a micro-organism like yeast to create dairy proteins, whey and casein, via fermentation. Those dairy proteins are then combined with water and plant-based ingredients to create a dairy substitute that can be used to make ice cream, cheese, yogurt and a slew of other dairy products.

Gandhi, 28, says the dairy substitute is nutritionally identical to cow’s milk and tastes just like it. In fact, while Perfect Day Foods at least considers its product “vegan” and lactose-free (since lactose is a sugar found only in mammals’ milk), federal law actually requires them to put “contains milk” on any labeling because its protein is identical to cow’s milk on a molecular level and could cause allergies.

Co-founder Rayan Pandya, 27, says the process to make the dairy is similar to what plant-based “meat” start-up Impossible Foods is doing using heme, a molecule in soy plants that’s identical to the heme molecule found in meat. Using heme, Impossible Foods is able to make its vegetarian meat substitute taste and feel like beef without using animals.

The limited edition run of 1,000 three-packs of Perfect Day ice cream — a pint each of Milky Chocolate, Vanilla Salted Fudge and Vanilla Blackberry Toffee for $60, which costs closer to $100 with dry ice shipping — was the first and only product released by Perfect Day Foods (which has been working with the Food and Drug Administration since 2014) to drum up buzz. The pints, which were sold on the company’s website, will be delivered to customers in three to four weeks, according to the founders.

Perfect Day Foods

Perfect Day Foods

One writer who got an early taste of the product said she was surprised how creamy and smooth it was and claimed it tasted just like real ice cream. Another reviewer, who has been a vegan for years, said while the product is good (and creamy), it may not be for people who believe dairy is detrimental to your health.

Pandya says while the $20 a pint is high, they decided on the cost based on other premium direct-to-consumer ice creams being shipped on dry ice in the U.S. Most of the premium pints on the web today range from $12 to $17 a pint.

For any future ice cream made with Perfect Day’s dairy proteins, the company plans to work with ice cream manufacturers rather than produce and sell it themselves, according to the founder. And the company plans to forge partnerships with brands and food manufacturers to ultimately become a dairy supplier. Perfect Day says it already has several deals in the works but declined to disclose any names.

This story has been updated and revised to clarify the process by which the animal-free dairy is created. 

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Perfect Day Foods founders, Ryan Pandya and Perumal Gandhi

Perfect Day Foods

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Plant-based dairy has a new competitor in flora-based foods – Quartz

Soon, one of Silicon Valley’s most talked about food tech companies will wade into grocery store dairy sections with a bold line of new foods. Perfect Day—which in 2014 year found a way to use yeast to make milk protein without ever needing a cow—announced today (July 11) that it will be scaling up its microbial technology with the help of some of the food industry’s biggest companies.

In the process, the Bay Area startup is creating a whole new category of food. You’ve heard of plant-based foods; next, you’ll be able to eat “flora-based” food.

That’s the term co-founders Ryan Pandya and Perumal Gandhi settled on to describe products made using microorganisms—including the yeast they use to create casein, the main protein found in cow milk. Perfect Day claims its yeast-based milk proteins have all the functionality and taste of the milk proteins food companies have extracted from dairy for more than a century, but with none of the environmental downsides.

It takes a lot of energy to grow and transport the animal feed that dairy cows eat. And those cows produce a lot of methane that winds up in the Earth’s warming atmosphere. Perfect Day says its product will allow food manufacturers who sell ice cream, sour cream, cheeses, butter, milk, and other dairy products to use their protein instead of the kind they’ve traditionally gotten from milk.

To roll out the concept to the general public, the company is selling a limited-batch of 3,000 containers of flora-based ice cream on its website for $20 apiece (a cost that includes shipping in dry ice). By engaging and educating people about the new category of food, the company hopes to get ahead of any questions people might have about it.

One of those questions sticks out like a sore thumb, and that’s because it’s right on the label. The protein Perfect Day uses may not come from cow milk, but it’s still technically milk protein—and that’s what’s printed on the ingredients list, because that’s how the US Food and Drug Administration regulates product labeling. But for an everyday shopper that might be confusing.

“We need to start building value around this third category,” Gandhi says. To do that, he wants to tackle confusion head-on, explaining how their new flora-based milk protein is different from the kind that comes from cows. The company’s protein product is made by altering sections of the DNA sequence of food-grade yeast such that the microorganisms, once fed with certain nutrients, produce several key proteins found in milk, including casein and whey.

In the coming months, the startup says it will roll out announcements of partnerships with other food companies. Perfect Day isn’t looking to push food out under its own label so much as it wants to license its technology to other companies; those partners will incorporate it into their recipes and print the Perfect Day logo somewhere on their own product packaging. That will be more possible as the massive Archer Daniels Midland company works with Perfect Day to scale up the supply of yeast-based milk protein available to the market.

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Milk and dairy products, when consumed in moderation, may protect against chronic diseases, study… – Daily Sabah

An adequate consumption of milk and dairy products in different stages of life can help prevent various chronic diseases, including the risk of frailty and sarcopenia, cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome, colon or bladder cancer, and type 2 diabetes, a recent study has revealed, contradicting the dominant literature in the field.

A group of scholars from Spain’s University of Granada (UGR) and the Complutense University of Madrid evaluated and meta-analyzed 14 articles from around the world about the role of milk and dairy products in the prevention of chronic diseases. The findings were published in the medical “Advances in Nutrition,” suggesting different results when compared to the recent medical literature.

The study exerted that there was a positive link between moderate intake of milk during pregnancy and birth weight, length and bone mineral content during childhood. It also suggested that a daily intake of milk and dairy products among elderly people could reduce the risk of frailty and sarcopenia.

The research, which was led by Professor Angel Gil from the UGR and Professor Rosa M. Ortega of Complutense University, revealed that the consumption of such products, especially those of low-fat dairy and yogurt which contain multiple nutrients and contribute to meeting our daily nutritional needs for protein, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, selenium, vitamin A, riboflavin, vitamin B12, and pantothenic acid, may be associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

The moderate consumption of milk and dairy products is also associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer and bladder cancer, while no links were found for prostate cancer, the study said.

The study, however, found that such products may not provide protection against osteoporotic fractures and hip fractures, but may strengthen the vertebrae.

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Lab-grown dairy: The next food frontier – Phys.Org

Lab-grown dairy: The next food frontier
Could dairy products soon be produced in labs? Credit: Shutterstock

Lab-grown meat is getting a lot of attention along with plant-based meat substitutes. Technology is driving the industry toward providing alternatives to conventionally produced food products. Dairy proteins may be the next product produced in a lab, for use in fluid “milk” production and processed dairy products like yogurt and cheese, to name a few.

Winston Churchill predicted the rise of synthetic foods in 1931. “We shall escape the absurdity of growing a whole chicken in order to eat the breast or wing, by growing these parts separately under a suitable medium. Synthetic food will, of course, also be used in the future.”

While it took longer than 50 years, his prediction is coming true with meat proteins and now dairy proteins.

What is synthetic dairy?

Perfect Day Inc., a California-based start-up, has recreated the proteins found in conventional cow’s milk without the use of animals. The company developed a form of genetically modified microflora that produces both whey and casein through a fermentation process.

The approach can be loosely compared to the use of brewer’s yeast to produce alcohol. Yeast is used in controlled environments to create fermentation byproducts and the two processes simply employ different yeasts for a different purpose and output.

Perfect Day says their product is the exact same as the protein found in cow’s milk. Conventional milk is approximately 3.3 percent protein, of which 82 per is casein and 18 percent is whey. The other main elements are water, fat and carbohydrates.

Perfect Day has the technology to remake the small fraction of milk that is protein, arguably the most important component to produce other foods. The company suggests that its dairy protein is vegan and lactose-free, while providing the same high-quality nutrition as conventional dairy protein. This could have significant appeal for consumers.

Tough to mimic full-fat milks

Milk produced by dairy cattle is a versatile ingredient used in various products worldwide. More than 70 percent of milk sold from Canadian farms in 2019 is used for further processing, leaving the remainder to be consumed as fluid milk.

It may be difficult to produce full-fat milks that mimic the taste and texture of cow’s milk. Protein is just one component of fluid milk; milk fat is another, which would likely be the most difficult to mimic with plant-based alternatives. The structure of milk fat provides a specific taste and mouth feel when drinking milk, and this may be a tougher formulation challenge than creating proteins to be used in cheese or yogurt.

The early focus of Perfect Day’s communication was on fluid milk —the kind we drink —but the company has shifted its focus to processed products.

Perfect Day has partnered with food production powerhouse Archer Daniels Midland (ADM), among others, to move towards full-scale production. The company is one of the world’s largest agricultural processors and food ingredient providers with more than 330 manufacturing facilities in almost 200 countries. ADM supplies a vast list of ingredients for both human and animal consumption; synthetic dairy protein may be a perfect addition to their offerings.

Products such as yogurt and cheese are different than fluid milk, and may be more suitable for using lab-grown casein and whey. The synthetic proteins could be used to replace dairy milk ingredients or to complement them.

In yogurt production, for example, protein is often added to improve texture. There are differing proportions of milk components in various processed products. This means that fermented casein and whey proteins could augment or replace conventional protein ingredients. This is easier to do in products with high-protein ingredients.

That said, the potential use of animal-free dairy protein goes far beyond traditional dairy products such as cheese and yogurt. Hot dogs that contain milk powder and granola bars that contain modified milk ingredients are examples of the many foods that could use this alternative dairy protein.

Tackling malnutrition?

Perfect Day CEO Ryan Pandya said last year: “We began to look into how we can use our protein to prevent stunted growth and malnutrition in the developing world.” This suggests Perfect Day’s focus is on providing ingredients rather than producing milk.

Some products aren’t well-suited to this approach. Butter, for example, is made from milk fat and has almost no protein. We’ve long had a plant-based alternative to butter —margarine. But many consumers moved away from margarine and back to butter.

The Canadian per capita consumption of butter increased from 2.72 kilograms to 3.21 kilograms from 2007 to 2016. This increase in butter demand has led to an excess of milk protein in the marketplace in both Canada and the United States.

While it remains to be seen if these fermented proteins can be produced economically, their introduction into the marketplace could cause significant disruption to the dairy industry. The disruption would be due in part to switching some processed products away from conventional dairy proteins.

There would be additional disruption because of the change in relative demand for protein and other milk components. We would likely end up with more significant surpluses of proteins from both conventional dairy and synthetic production.

The future

Many issues need to be resolved before these products arrive in our supermarkets. The economics of production have to work. Products need to be reformulated to incorporate the fermented proteins with other ingredients to replace the milk components.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency currently describes milk as being produced by an animal. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not yet made a policy statement on classifying synthetic milk proteins.

Milk in Canada is also subject to a supply management system that includes quota for production.

Will synthetic casein and whey be subject to the same system? The regulatory environment will require significant clarification, and any changes will be vigorously debated by various interests.

Some consumers will highly value the fact that animals are not required to produce these proteins, creating a vegan, lactose-free product. There will also be a perception that synthetic dairy proteins will have a smaller environmental footprint.

Other consumers will likely have concerns that the proteins are produced using a genetically modified yeast.

Despite these uncertainties, we will likely see synthetic dairy products on grocery shelves within a few years.


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This June Dairy Month, Learn To Separate Milk Myths From The Honest Truth – Yahoo Finance

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Raise a Toast to Milk This Summer &amp; Trust That You Can Always Count on Milk” data-reactid=”11″>Raise a Toast to Milk This Summer & Trust That You Can Always Count on Milk

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="SAN CLEMENTE, Calif., June 4, 2019 /PRNewswire/ –&nbsp;The California Milk Processor Board (CMPB), creators of the iconic got milk?&nbsp;campaign, is celebrating June Dairy Month by partnering with leading health expert and best-selling author Dr. Nina Shapiro&nbsp;in an effort to dispel milk myths in today’s "mis" information era and help California consumers better understand the benefits of one of the original, farm-to-table super foods – real, wholesome dairy milk.” data-reactid=”12″>SAN CLEMENTE, Calif., June 4, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — The California Milk Processor Board (CMPB), creators of the iconic got milk? campaign, is celebrating June Dairy Month by partnering with leading health expert and best-selling author Dr. Nina Shapiro in an effort to dispel milk myths in today’s “mis” information era and help California consumers better understand the benefits of one of the original, farm-to-table super foods – real, wholesome dairy milk.

California Milk Processor Board (PRNewsfoto/California Milk Processor Board)California Milk Processor Board (PRNewsfoto/California Milk Processor Board)
California Milk Processor Board (PRNewsfoto/California Milk Processor Board)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content=""This June, we want Californians to be armed with the right knowledge in order to make informed decisions about their health," said Steve James, executive director of the CMPB.&nbsp; "And that includes real wholesome dairy milk, the original farm-to-table food that comes from California cows."” data-reactid=”24″>”This June, we want Californians to be armed with the right knowledge in order to make informed decisions about their health,” said Steve James, executive director of the CMPB.  “And that includes real wholesome dairy milk, the original farm-to-table food that comes from California cows.”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The ongoing quest for a healthful lifestyle has many consumers chasing the latest trends found on social media, as well as overspending on costly processed beverages that simply didn't exist 10 years ago.&nbsp; Much of what's driving consumers choices today in the supermarket aisles is a growing fear factor driven by click-bait headlines instead of real nutritional facts. Take, for instance real wholesome dairy milk.&nbsp; All-natural dairy milk offers a range of healthful benefits&nbsp;including nine essential nutrients including high-quality protein to help build and maintain lean muscle, B vitamins for energy, vitamin A for a healthy immune system, potassium to regulate the balance of fluids in the body and bone building nutrients including calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D.&nbsp; Moreover, milk offers affordable great tasting natural hydration, never with any added sugar, hormones or antibiotics, and helps promotes a good night’s sleep.” data-reactid=”25″>The ongoing quest for a healthful lifestyle has many consumers chasing the latest trends found on social media, as well as overspending on costly processed beverages that simply didn’t exist 10 years ago.  Much of what’s driving consumers choices today in the supermarket aisles is a growing fear factor driven by click-bait headlines instead of real nutritional facts. Take, for instance real wholesome dairy milk.  All-natural dairy milk offers a range of healthful benefits including nine essential nutrients including high-quality protein to help build and maintain lean muscle, B vitamins for energy, vitamin A for a healthy immune system, potassium to regulate the balance of fluids in the body and bone building nutrients including calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D.  Moreover, milk offers affordable great tasting natural hydration, never with any added sugar, hormones or antibiotics, and helps promotes a good night’s sleep.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="That's the advice of Harvard and Cornell-educated physician, and mom, Nina Shapiro, M.D.&nbsp; Separating the truth from the many myths and trends in today’s "mis" information era is one of the concerns that Dr. Shapiro addresses in her practice, as well as from friends, acquaintances and parents.&nbsp; In her work as a surgeon and professor, Dr. Shapiro author of Hype, a Doctor’s Guide to Medical Myths, Exaggerated Claims and Bad Advice&nbsp;– How to Tell What’s Real and What’s Not, strives to guide her patients and their families to make informed decisions about their health.&nbsp;” data-reactid=”26″>That’s the advice of Harvard and Cornell-educated physician, and mom, Nina Shapiro, M.D.  Separating the truth from the many myths and trends in today’s “mis” information era is one of the concerns that Dr. Shapiro addresses in her practice, as well as from friends, acquaintances and parents.  In her work as a surgeon and professor, Dr. Shapiro author of Hype, a Doctor’s Guide to Medical Myths, Exaggerated Claims and Bad Advice – How to Tell What’s Real and What’s Not, strives to guide her patients and their families to make informed decisions about their health. 

According to Dr. Shapiro, the many myths today that are upheld by popular public wisdom and perpetuated by today’s culture of pseudo-news are doing more harm than good.  “It’s very important in today’s internet-driven, informational culture that consumers learn to separate fact from fiction when it comes to understanding the benefits that comes from dairy milk versus plant-based alternative, processed varieties,” said Dr. Shapiro.  “What’s needed is evidence-based common sense and a bit of expert guidance in order for consumers to become more empowered and more well-informed.”

Dr. Shapiro’s top six milk myths include:

  • Myth: Drinking milk leads to respiratory infections, including colds, coughs, and ear infections. Fact: No existing evidence supports this. The only time this may be even remotely related is if an infant or child were to drink a bottle of milk in the crib, in the middle of the night. But this would be the case for any food or drink being eaten, except for water.
  • Myth: Consuming milk or dairy products slows healing after tonsillectomy or during sore throats. Fact: This is absolutely not true. One of the fun side-benefits of kids getting their tonsils removed is that they get to eat ice cream, and drink milk smoothies during recovery. In fact, the more kids consume, especially liquids containing protein and vitamins, the faster they’ll heal.
  • Myth: Milk causes weight gain and can cause cancer. Fact: Not true. Much of the rise of obesity is partly due to increased processed foods/fast foods/fried foods/convenience foods, and decreased exercise and activity, even beginning in childhood. Drinking milk is filling and has no direct correlation with weight gain (1,3). As far as cancers go, no diet study can show direct cause, only correlation. There is no consistent data from any study showing that dairy increases risks of any type of cancer.
  • Myth: Dairy is bad for your heart. Fact: Actually, the complete opposite is true. The PURE (Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology) study, recently published in The Lancet, looked at nearly 150,000 adults from 21 countries and five continents with respect to dairy intake and heart disease over a nine-year period (2). They found that subjects who consumed greater than two servings per day of dairy products versus those who consumed no dairy products had lower risk of heart-related disease, as well as a lower risk of death overall. In particular, milk, of all dairy products resulted in the lowest risks in this study. Interestingly, subjects who consumed whole-fat milk were the healthiest.
  • Myth: Diabetics should avoid dairy products. Fact: A recent large meta-analysis study, looking at up to 500,000 adults ranging from ages 20 to 88 years, found that higher amounts of dairy consumption correlated to lower incidence of type 2 diabetes (4). This was most notable for total dairy product consumption, low-fat dairy consumption, and yogurt. Overall, the higher amount of dairy product consumed correlated to lower and lower risks of type 2 diabetes.
  • Myth: I have lactose intolerance, so it must be a milk allergy. Fact: Lactase is an enzyme that helps break down one of the sugars in milk (lactose) during digestion. Some people have lower amounts of this; often drinking a little less is the answer. There are also lactose-free milk products, or tablets to ingest which contain lactase, making milk digestion easier. But this is NOT an allergy. True milk allergies, with vomiting, rashes, and even anaphylaxis, affect less than one percent of the adult population (5).

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="About Dr. Nina Shapiro
Dr. Nina Shapiro is one of America’s leading physicians and has more than two decades of experience in clinical and academic medicine and her recent book, Hype: A Doctor’s Guide to Medical Myths, tackles the latest health fads and misconceptions.&nbsp; Dr. Shapiro is a graduate of Harvard Medical School and Cornell University, she completed her surgical residency at Harvard and finished additional subspecialty training in pediatric otolaryngology at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London and the Children’s Hospital of San Diego. She is the "go-to physician" in Los Angeles and around the world, as many international patients seek her out for treatment of challenging cases that can’t be resolved in their own countries.&nbsp; She works with patients and families to guide them in making decisions every day about their health. Dr. Shapiro has regularly provided professional insight and commentary for CBS’s "The Early Show," "Extra," and "The Doctors," when there’s a controversial health study or a medical story in the news.&nbsp; Her work has also been featured and published in the Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Prevention, and many other print and online publications. (http://drninashapiro.com/curriculum-vitae).” data-reactid=”36″>About Dr. Nina Shapiro
Dr. Nina Shapiro is one of America’s leading physicians and has more than two decades of experience in clinical and academic medicine and her recent book, Hype: A Doctor’s Guide to Medical Myths, tackles the latest health fads and misconceptions.  Dr. Shapiro is a graduate of Harvard Medical School and Cornell University, she completed her surgical residency at Harvard and finished additional subspecialty training in pediatric otolaryngology at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London and the Children’s Hospital of San Diego. She is the “go-to physician” in Los Angeles and around the world, as many international patients seek her out for treatment of challenging cases that can’t be resolved in their own countries.  She works with patients and families to guide them in making decisions every day about their health. Dr. Shapiro has regularly provided professional insight and commentary for CBS’s “The Early Show,” “Extra,” and “The Doctors,” when there’s a controversial health study or a medical story in the news.  Her work has also been featured and published in the Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Prevention, and many other print and online publications. (http://drninashapiro.com/curriculum-vitae).

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="About the CMPB
Since 1993, the California Milk Processor Board (CMPB), creator of the famous got milk? campaign, remains dedicated to increasing milk consumption throughout California. Its latest multi-platform multicultural campaign, You Can Always Count on Milk, captures today’s children facing daily challenges and powering through it all with milk as their trusted drink of choice before, during and after a long day. As of July 2018, the CMPB features a newly revamped website offering millennial families with the fun takes on how they can rely on milk, nutritional advice for a healthier lifestyle, and a variety of ways to incorporate milk into easy-to-make recipes they can try at home. The CMPB is funded by all&nbsp;California&nbsp;milk processors and administered by the California Department of Food and Agriculture.&nbsp;The got milk? trademark is a federally registered trademark and service mark. For more information, visit&nbsp;www.gotmilk.com.” data-reactid=”41″>About the CMPB
Since 1993, the California Milk Processor Board (CMPB), creator of the famous got milk? campaign, remains dedicated to increasing milk consumption throughout California. Its latest multi-platform multicultural campaign, You Can Always Count on Milk, captures today’s children facing daily challenges and powering through it all with milk as their trusted drink of choice before, during and after a long day. As of July 2018, the CMPB features a newly revamped website offering millennial families with the fun takes on how they can rely on milk, nutritional advice for a healthier lifestyle, and a variety of ways to incorporate milk into easy-to-make recipes they can try at home. The CMPB is funded by all California milk processors and administered by the California Department of Food and Agriculture. The got milk? trademark is a federally registered trademark and service mark. For more information, visit www.gotmilk.com.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Sources:” data-reactid=”42″>Sources:

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="1:&nbsp; Food Nutr Res.&nbsp;2016 Nov 22;60:32527. doi: 10.3402/fnrv60.32527. eCollection 2016, Milk and dairy products: good or bad for human health? An assessment of the totality of scientific evidence, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27882862″ data-reactid=”43″>1:  Food Nutr Res. 2016 Nov 22;60:32527. doi: 10.3402/fnrv60.32527. eCollection 2016, Milk and dairy products: good or bad for human health? An assessment of the totality of scientific evidence, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27882862

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="2. Lancet.&nbsp;2018 Nov 24;392(10161):2288-2297. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31812-9. Epub 2018 Sep 11. Association of dairy intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality in 21 countries from five continents (PURE): a prospective cohort study.&nbsp; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30217460″ data-reactid=”44″>2. Lancet. 2018 Nov 24;392(10161):2288-2297. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31812-9. Epub 2018 Sep 11. Association of dairy intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality in 21 countries from five continents (PURE): a prospective cohort study.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30217460

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="3. Adv Nutr.&nbsp;2019 May 1;10(suppl_2):S67-S73. doi: 10.1093/advances/nmz020. Introduction and Executive Summary of the Supplement, Role of Milk and Dairy Products in Health and Prevention of Noncommunicable Chronic Diseases: A Series of Systematic Reviews.&nbsp;https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31089742&nbsp;” data-reactid=”45″>3. Adv Nutr. 2019 May 1;10(suppl_2):S67-S73. doi: 10.1093/advances/nmz020. Introduction and Executive Summary of the Supplement, Role of Milk and Dairy Products in Health and Prevention of Noncommunicable Chronic Diseases: A Series of Systematic Reviews. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31089742 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="4. Adv Nutr.&nbsp;2019 May 1;10(suppl_2):S154-S163. doi: 10.1093/advances/nmy107, Effects of Milk and Dairy Product Consumption on Type 2 Diabetes: Overview of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31089734 &nbsp;&nbsp;” data-reactid=”46″>4. Adv Nutr. 2019 May 1;10(suppl_2):S154-S163. doi: 10.1093/advances/nmy107, Effects of Milk and Dairy Product Consumption on Type 2 Diabetes: Overview of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31089734   

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="5. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma &amp; Immunology. 2017. Prevalence of food allergies and intolerance documented in electronic health records. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28577971″ data-reactid=”47″>5. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. 2017. Prevalence of food allergies and intolerance documented in electronic health records. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28577971

 

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